Reformation: Public Art and the Philadelphia School Closures

Pepón Osorio. reForm, 2015; installation view, Temple University's Tyler School of Art. Photo: Constance Mensh.

Today from our friends at Pelican Bomb, we bring you Meredith Sellers’ article examining reForm, Pepón Osorio’s installation project at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. Sellers discusses reForm critically in the larger political context of Philadelphia school closures. She states, “The reForm project […] aims to create much-needed public discussion around the fate of the Philadelphia school system and to be a potential catalyst for change. But a classroom,[…..]

Tomás Saraceno: Arachnid Orchestra. Jam Sessions at NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore

Tomás Saraceno, Omega Centauri 1 Nephila Kenianensis 4 Cyrtophora citricola, 2014; Spidersilk, carbon fibre, light, Tripod. Courtesy of the artist and Esther Schipper Gallery, Berlin.

The gallery hums with screechy sounds resembling acoustic feedback, punctuated by random bursts of bass and cartoonish sound effects. The soundscape is queasily amorphous and disorienting, built on dissonance and the chaotic rhythms resonating from a handful of arachnids that have woven fine, thick webs around delicate wire frames. Featuring a plethora of spiderweb sound installations, Tomás Saraceno’s latest show Arachnid Orchestra. Jam Sessions is[…..]

Ken Price: Death Shrine I at the Harwood Museum of Art

Ken Price. Death Shrine I, 1972-76; dimensions variable. Courtesy of Ken Price Studio.

Ken Price is best known for his psychedelic ceramic sculptures: abstractions layered in paint and sanded to pristine finishes. His piece Death Shrine I (1972–1976), permanently installed at the Harwood Museum of Art in Taos, New Mexico, is an unexpected departure from this canon. The shrine is a facet of Price’s Happy’s Curios project, and is one of three such installations inspired by the iconography[…..]

Impossible Objects at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow

Impossible Objects, 2014; installation view, Impossible Objects, 2015. Courtesy of Instytut Architektury, Krakow. Photo: Jakub Woynarowski

Cultural reproduction is at the center of Impossible Objects, an exhibition that returns to Poland after much lauded recognition at the Venice Biennale. On central display is a 1:1 replica of the baldachin designed by Adolf Szyszko-Bohusz at the beginning of the 20th century to honor the revolutionary Polish leader Marshal Józef Piłsudski. The reproduction is accompanied by artist and artistic director Jakub Woynarowski’s large-scale[…..]

Interview with Robin Rhode

Robin Rhode. Chalk Bicycle (detail), 2011-2015; chalk and steel bicycle. Courtesy of the Artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York. Photo: Max Yawney.

Today from our friends at BOMB, we bring you an interview with artist Robin Rhode. Author Lee Ann Norman talks with Rhode about his upcoming performance Erwartung: A Street Opera for Performa 15, growing up in South Africa, and “what it means to make art in an increasingly globalized world.” This article was originally published on August 13, 2015. Cape Town-born and Berlin-based multidisciplinary artist[…..]

Natasha Nicholson: The Artist in Her Museum at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Natasha Nicholson, Studiolo, installation view, Nicholson studio, 2015. Courtesy of the Artist and Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Photo: Mike Rebholz.

If the test for the quality of an exhibition is the richness of associations it generates in a viewer, then Natasha Nicholson: The Artist in Her Museum at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art is a goldmine. The show is installed in the museum as a series of rooms, facsimiles of the artist’s studio: the Thinking Room, Strata (the studio and gallery), the Studiolo (library[…..]

Fan Mail: Victor Solomon

Victor Solomon. You Know I Gotta Show Out, 2015; glass, mirror, lead, 24K gold-plated high polish steel, wood, Swarovski crystal; 44 in x 40 in x 20 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

For a year, Victor Solomon apprenticed with stained-glass masters who taught him everything he needed to know about this oft-forgotten craft. Solomon is not a stained-glass artist, and though he doesn’t particularly aspire to be one, an idea took a hold of him and compelled him to take up this traditional medium. Literally Balling is an ongoing project in which the San Francisco-based artist explores[…..]