Installation

Ranjani Shettar: Night Skies and Daydreams at Talwar Gallery

Ranjani Shettar. Tuntoroo, 2014; Hand‐molded wax beads, cotton thread, wooden beads and pigments; 131 x 188 x 135 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Talwar Gallery, New York and New Delhi.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Ranjani Shettar: Night Skies and Daydreams at Talwar Gallery in New York City.   Indian sculptor Ranjani Shettar’s seventh solo exhibition Night Skies and Daydreams[…..]

Home and Away: Chien-chi Chang and Chen Chieh-jen at the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation

Chen Chieh-jen Realm of Reverberations, installation view at Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation image courtesy SCAF

The word “home” has elusive, slippery connotations. In Chinese, the character “jia” (家) also means “family.” It suggests notions of sanctuary, shelter, belonging. But for some the meanings are more complicated. For the marginalized, the outsiders, the lost ones in our midst, it reminds them of all that is missing. For others, in a world crisscrossed by a diaspora of dislocated people seeking safety and[…..]

Rirkrit Tiravanija: Time Travelers Chronicle (Doubt): 2014 – 802,701 A.D at Singapore Tyler Print Institute

Rirkrit Tiravanija. Sixth chapter: take the spin off, unwind, reverse directions, and shatter the bonsai, on the way back don't forget to smile, 2013; screen print, metal foil, cast paper, STPI handmade cotton paper, stainless steel pedestal, 3D printed object; 259.5 x 259.5 cm; 4 sheets. Image courtesy of Singapore Tyler Print Institute.

“There is no difference between Time and any of the three dimensions of Space except that our consciousness moves along it.”—H.G. Wells, The Time Machine (1895) In 1992, Rirkrit Tiravanija converted the spaces of 303 Gallery in New York into a kitchen where he served rice and Thai curry to a crowd that became unwitting participants in a hybrid installation titled Untitled (Free). Seven years[…..]

Isa Genzken: Retrospective at MCA Chicago

Installation view, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, MCA Chicago. April 12-August 3, 2014. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.

Perhaps the most striking aspect of Isa Genzken: Retrospective—an expansive four-decade survey of the German artist’s work at MCA Chicago featuring sculpture, film, installation, painting, and photography—is the fact that it was all made by the same person. Over the course of her career, Genzken has successfully assimilated a wide array of styles without losing sight of a handful of core concerns: architectural structure, the[…..]

From the Archives – Abolishing War: A Conversation with Krzysztof Wodiczko

Krzysztof Wodiczko, War Veteran Vehicle, Liverpool, 2009. Photography courtesy Robert Ochshorn.

Today is Memorial Day in the United States, a day to remember the men and women who died while serving in our armed forces. In honor of this day, we bring you author Michelle Schultz’s interview with artist Krzysztof Wodiczko, who contends, “There is an extremely thick wall that separates those who know what war is and those who don’t.” This interview was originally published on January 2, 2012. Krzysztof[…..]

Mike Nelson: Amnesiac Hide at The Power Plant

Mike Nelson. Quiver of Arrows, 2010; mixed media. Courtesy of The Power Plant

Recently, it seems that when Toronto’s mayor isn’t making headlines, the city’s overheated condo market is. Getting to Amnesiac Hide, Mike Nelson’s exhibition at The Power Plant, is an exercise in navigating the realities of this fervor. Queen’s Quay, the city’s so-called “revived waterfront,” is undergoing a makeover in the midst of rising condo towers, which makes for a messy route to the gallery. But[…..]

Interview with Josh Short

Josh Short. Going to Church, 2014; installation view, The Warehouse, Salina Art Center. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: April Engstrom.

I’ve recently been introduced to the term prairie madness. It’s fictional—not founded in medicine—but it captured my imagination all the same. Artist Josh Short laughed as he explained it to me: The gist is that one can be driven to psychosis by the far-flung expansiveness of the Midwest. Characters in novels have been driven to tears by the isolation, the seemingly never-ending wind, and their[…..]