Installation

From the Archives – Sarah Lucas: SITUATION Absolute Beach Man Rubble at Whitechapel Gallery

Sarah Lucas. Installation view, 2013 Courtesy Whitechapel Gallery, London, Photo: Stephen White

Here at Daily Serving, we’re excited that Sarah Lucas will represent the UK at the 2015 Venice Biennale. Gregor Muir, a member of the selection panel, was quoted in a recent article, saying, “Having consistently pushed the limits of her practice, there’s a sense that Lucas—seemingly more active than ever—is coming into her own.” We couldn’t agree more, and so today from our archives we’re sharing[…..]

Anarchy, Tea, and After-Dinner Calligraphy: Interview with the Yangjiang Group

Yangjiang Group. Final Days, 2015; installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, wax and modified clothing installation,
dimensions variable. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists and Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou. Photo: Zan Wimberley

For contemporary Chinese artists Zheng Guogu, Chen Zaiyan, and Sun Qinglin—known as the Yangjiang Group—art is about social action and everyday life, including the practice of calligraphy, shopping, football, gambling, drinking, and eating. They believe art and life are entirely connected, resisting the commercialism of the art market and the over-intellectualization of art. Their latest project, Actions for Tomorrow, includes a live event, Tea Office, as a[…..]

Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions at El Museo del Barrio

Adal Maldonado (ADAL). El Spanglish Sandwich, 2000; printed ceramic plate and stand; 8-inch diam. Courtesy of El Museo del Barrio.

Declarations of dissent can manifest in many ways. Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions, currently on view at El Museo del Barrio, surveys a range of Latin American and Caribbean artists who through their art practices have voiced their dissent from oppressive cultural forces. The curator, Nicolás Dumit Estévez, frames these artistic impulses as foundational to the history and spirit of[…..]

Loris Gréaud: The Unplayed Notes Museum at Dallas Contemporary

Loris.

From our friends at Glasstire, today we bring you Christina Rees’ review of Loris Gréaud’s current solo exhibition at Dallas Contemporary. Rees describes the choreographed destruction of the work and characterizes the show as “a partial and contrived ruin,” noting that neither the artist nor the visitors seem invested. This article was originally published on January 19, 2015.  I suppose in the event of a chemical attack[…..]

Walead Beshty: A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future at Barbican Center

2.	Walead Beshty. Installation Shot of A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future: Helter-Skelter and Random Notes in Which the Pulleys and Cogwheels Are Lying Around at Random All Over the Workbench. 2013-2014. Wall Installation Made of Cyanotypes. Photo: Getty Images/Chris Jackson.

In 1979 at the Whitney Museum of American Art, American avant-garde filmmaker Hollis Frampton gave a lecture devoted to the origins of film and the utility of defunct technologies. Toward the end, Frampton paused to vaguely describe a work of art composed of the accumulating detritus, by-products, and disparate actions piling up in his studio, which he called A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without[…..]

Living with Endangered Languages in the Technological Age at Root Division Gallery

Tessie Barrera Scharaga. Nahua-Pipil, the Forbidden Language of El Salvador, 2014; Mixed media installation, 
10 x 7 x 11 ft.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Nancy Garcia reviews Living with Endangered Languages in the Technological Age at Root Division in San Francisco. In Living with Endangered Languages in the Technological[…..]

Pierre Huyghe at LACMA

Pierre Huyghe. Untitled (Human Mask), 2014. Film. Courtesy of the artist; Hauser and Wirth, London; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York; Esther Schipper, Berlin; Anna Lena, Paris. © Pierre Huyghe

There is a scene in Pierre Huyghe’s shadowy, dreamlike film The Host and the Cloud (2010) in which a woman produces a black rabbit from an unmarked box. No magician, she handles the unexpected animal with a mixture of bewilderment and acute apprehension. Later in the film, she confronts the event during hypnotherapy; then, in a key conversion, she watches her own analysis session performed[…..]