Mixed Media

Andrew Birk: Callejero at Anonymous Gallery

Andrew Birk. Callejero, 2016; installation view, Anonymous Gallery, Mexico City. Courtesy the artist and Anonymous Gallery, Mexico City.

Andrew Birk is a gringo. I don’t mention this as an insult—I’m one too, after all—but to give some context to his work. The Portland, Oregon, native has lived in Mexico City since 2011 and has a clear affinity for the cacophony and vibrancy of this dense, sprawling metropolis. It is with the fresh eyes of an outsider that Birk is able to translate the[…..]

Mónica Mayer: Si Tiene Dudas… Pregunte at Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo

Mónica Mayer. Lo normal, 1978 (detail); print intervened with stamps, 10 cards. Courtesy of the artist and Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo.

Si Tiene Dudas… Pregunte [When in Doubt… Ask] at the Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo (MUAC) is a retrocollective of works by feminist art pioneer Mónica Mayer (b. Mexico City, 1954). “Retrocollective” isn’t a very well-known term[1] and certainly not one that many artists would choose to designate their career retrospective, but Mónica Mayer isn’t like other artists. Since the late ’70s, Mayer has been[…..]

Noam Rappaport: Dogleg at Ratio 3

Noam Rappaport. Dogleg, 2015; oil, acrylic, high-density foam, paper, canvas; 90 x 55 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Ratio 3, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Justin Mata reviews Noam Rappaport: Dogleg at Ratio 3 in San Francisco. Noam Rappaport’s artwork exists in a continuum of modernist object-making, a growing history of formal exploration.[…..]

John Outterbridge: Rag Man at Art + Practice

John Outterbridge. Case in Point, c. 1970 (from the Rag Man Series); mixed media; 12 x 12 x 24 inches. Collection of the Hammer Museum. Photo: Andrew Zermeño.

In the South Central Los Angeles neighborhood of Leimert Park, an art and social movement is gaining steam. Art + Practice is a community outreach and education center as well as a gallery in partnership with UCLA’s Hammer Museum. Founded by artist Mark Bradford, philanthropist Eileen Harris Norton, and social activist Allan Di Castro, Art + Practice aims to educate and prepare disadvantaged foster youth[…..]

Terra Incognita at Art@Archer

Brian Lucas. Seventh Sense, 2015; mixed media on canvas; 36 x24 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Art@Archer, Oakland. Photo: Garrett Caples.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Garrett Caples reviews Terra Incognita at Art@Archer in Oakland. In Terra Incognita at Art@Archer, Derek Fenner, Ava Koohbor, and Brian Lucas—who exhibited together last year at now-defunct Emerald[…..]

Know Yourself at the Luminary

Conrad Bakker. The Crystal Land, 2014 (detail); Oil on carved wood panels; 24 ft. x 20 in. Courtesy of The Luminary.

Currently at the Luminary, Know Yourself is a group exhibition that features the artists Conrad Bakker, Chris Bradley, Marianne Laury, Eva and Franco Mattes, Edra Soto, and Julia Weist. The exhibition shares its title with a Drake song in which the rapper looks back on his life, claiming his authenticity and lineage among other artists. He expounds, “I’ve always been me, I guess I know[…..]

Kota Ezawa: Gardner Museum Revisited at Christopher Grimes Gallery

Kota Ezawa. Gardner Museum Revisited, installation view, 2016. Courtesy of the artist and Christopher Grimes Gallery.

In 2013, Kota Ezawa once gave a presentation at the California College of the Arts about a man in Japan. As he explained it, Ezawa saw a man talking on CNN, with the name of “Kota Ezawa” printed in the bumper graphic at the bottom of the screen. This onscreen Ezawa was a scientist, and as Ezawa watched the interview, he became intrigued. The name[…..]