New Media

Oscar Muñoz: Sedimentaciones at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

Oscar Muñoz. Sedimentaciones, 2015; installation view. Courtesy of the Artist, the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa, and the Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection, Miami.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Danny Olda reviews Oscar Muñoz: Sedimentaciones at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum in Tampa.  The gallery is dark save for the surface of three[…..]

Living with Endangered Languages in the Technological Age at Root Division Gallery

Tessie Barrera Scharaga. Nahua-Pipil, the Forbidden Language of El Salvador, 2014; Mixed media installation, 
10 x 7 x 11 ft.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Nancy Garcia reviews Living with Endangered Languages in the Technological Age at Root Division in San Francisco. In Living with Endangered Languages in the Technological[…..]

From Beijing: Beijing Voice and Zhang Xiaotao at Pékin Fine Arts

Beijing Voice 'Unlived By What is Seen' installation view courtesy Pace Beijing

There has been noise of late about the supposedly derivative nature of contemporary art, about questionable curatorial practices, and about the piratical behavior of the art market. “Zombie Formalism” and “Crapstraction” are glib, voguish—although, it must be said, amusing—terms that have been thrown around. Whatever you may think about this critique of current tendencies in abstract painting, it seems that all is not well in the world[…..]

Pipilotti Rist: Worry Will Vanish and Stay Stamina Stay at Hauser & Wirth

Pipilotti Rist. Sleeping Pollen, 2014; audio-video installation (video projection, 11 mirror spheres, sound); dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Hauser & Wirth Somerset.

Worry Will Vanish and Stay Stamina Stay, parallel exhibitions by Pipilotti Rist at Hauser & Wirth in London and Somerset, respectively, feature footage generated during Rist’s recent residency at the gallery’s newest location in Somerset between summer 2012 and summer 2013. For material, Rist milks images from the plant life surrounding Durslade Farm, the historic Somerset compound that Hauser & Wirth has converted into gallery[…..]

Mean Time to Upgrade at InterAccess

Hannah Epstein. Cock Fight, 2010; mixed media. Courtesy of the Artist and InterAccess. Photo: Robin Hamill Photography 2014.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Shauna Jean Doherty reviews Mean Time to Upgrade at InterAccess in Toronto. The exhibition Mean Time to Upgrade at Toronto’s premiere new-media art gallery, InterAccess, responds to the[…..]

Antoine Catala: New Feelings at 47 Canal

The 2004 hit show Battlestar Galactica chronicles a future in which artificially intelligent robots called Cylons seek to destroy the human race as they advance and meld with technology in an almost mystical way. Constructed out of biological material, a bisected Cylon fighter plane actually bleeds—sinews, guts, and all. Other Cylons evolve to look exactly like human copies, and are so intelligent that they experience the complexities[…..]

#Hashtags: Black Futurism: The Creative Destruction and Reconstruction of Race in Contemporary Art

nuri Kahiu. Pumzi, film still, 2009. Courtesy Focus Features Africa First Short Film Program.

#blackness #afrofuturism #identity #agency #mobility Today we’re partnering with our friends at ART21 Magazine to bring you Nettrice Gaskins‘ excellent consideration of “Black futurism as a form of creative expression [that] pushes against the conventional limits of black subjectivity.” This article was originally published on June 24, 2014, in the “Future” issue of ART21 Magazine. For the online research project Liquid Blackness, Alessandra Raengo reflects on[…..]