Painting

Synecdoche at Jessica Silverman Gallery

Tony Lewis. Automatic, 2015; Pencil, graphite powder and tape on paper; 83 3/4 x 71 1/2 in. Courtesy of the Artist; Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago; Massimo De Carlo, London/Milan, and Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Hana Metzger reviews Synecdoche at Jessica Silverman Gallery in San Francisco.  Synecdoche, an exhibition at Jessica Silverman Gallery featuring twelve works by five artists, borrows its[…..]

Paw at Arcade Fine Arts

Pat O'Connor. Savant, 2015; gouache, acrylic and pen on paper, framed; 23 x 21cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Arcade Fine Arts, London.

The very idea that the plastic arts could provide a surface for human expression stands on the belief that an artist’s physical actions include elements both conscious and unconscious, and therefore expressive. On a paper or canvas, or in any matter able to preserve a human trace, the psychic interior of a person could be made visible through marks animated by thought and spirit and[…..]

Environmental Impact at the Hilliard University Art Museum

Edward Burtynsky. Oxford Tire Pile #2, Westley, California. 1999. Chromogenic color print. 40 x 50 inches. Image courtesy of Tom Thomsen Art Gallery, Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada.

The majesty of our planet—its sublime beauty, biological diversity, and ability to instigate powerful modes of metaphysical reflection within its human inhabitants—remains a constant motif in the history of Western art. The paintings of Claude Lorrain, Rembrandt, Caspar David Friedrich, and George Inness are enduring reminders of the aesthetic richness of the genre. The sensual pleasures that the natural world incites and the darker forces[…..]

Science in Surrealism at Gallery Wendi Norris

Kurt Seligmann. Moonscape, 1959; oil on canvas; 48 x 36 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Sienna Freeman reviews Science in Surrealism at Gallery Wendi Norris in San Francisco.  Gallery Wendi Norris’ current exhibition, Science in Surrealism, showcases 20 historic works from[…..]

Fan Mail: Zahra Nazari

Zahra Nazari. Inside Out Installation, 2014; acrylic on wood panel; 100 x 110 and 48 x 30 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Follow the white line back into the middle ground; it outlines a blue-gray pathway that comes to the front of the picture plane. The pathway entreats viewers to step into the architecture of Zahra Nazari’s surreal composition Landscape #14 (2013). Along the way, columns and a house abut the path, and as the line winds backward and diminishes, the horizontal pathway merges with a wall. Beyond[…..]

Ryan Wallace: LD50 at Romer Young Gallery

Ryan Wallace. LD50, 2015; installation view. Courtesy of the Artist and Romer Young Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Forrest McGarvey reviews Ryan Wallace: LD50 at Romer Young Gallery in San Francisco.  In his first solo show at Romer Young Gallery, New York[…..]

Peter Saul: Some Crazy Pictures at David Kordansky Gallery

Peter Saul. Singing Sandwich, 2014; acrylic on canvas; 60 x 72 inches. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

In an interview earlier this year, Peter Saul confessed, “I have to admit I’ve been enjoying myself. But through a large part of my life I’ve been desperately trying to think of some good reason for all this, and I haven’t really thought of a good reason. So that’s that.” Saul’s work is the kind that begs critics to ask, “But why?” while simultaneously and[…..]