Painting

Tomokazu Matsuyama: Come With Me at Gallery Wendi Norris

Tomokazu Matsuyama. Warm Water, 2015; acrylic and mixed media on canvas; 67 x 104 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Forrest McGarvey reviews Tomokazu Matsuyama’s Come with Me at Gallery Wendi Norris in San Francisco. In Come With Me, Japanese American artist Tomokazu[…..]

Hayv Kahraman: How Iraqi Are You? at Jack Shainman

Hayv Kahraman. Barboog, 2014; oil on linen; 108 x 72 in.©Hayv Kahraman. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Hayv Kahraman’s current solo exhibition at Jack Shainman, How Iraqi Are You?, is captivating. A suite of large paintings, produced in 2014 and 2015, show pairs and groups of women in patterned garments interacting with each other in minimal settings. Context is provided by simple architectural forms, and by Arabic script that appears under or alongside the figures. Text from the gallery explains that the works[…..]

Linear Abstraction at the SCAD Museum of Art

Phillip Stearns. Linear Abstraction, 2015; installation view. Gutstein Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia. Courtesy of the Savannah College of Art and Design. Photo: Marc Newton.

Abstraction is dead! Long live abstraction! In Linear Abstraction, the SCAD Museum of Art negotiates the status of nonrepresentational work as it exists in the 21st century and includes work in various media, including painting, sculpture, photography, and digital formats. While the exhibition seeks to trace commonalities between contemporary practices by engaging somewhat diverse uses or ideas of lines, the resulting effect points succinctly to[…..]

Jake Longstreth: Free Range at Gregory Lind Gallery

Jake Longstreth. Free Range, 2014; Oil on canvas in artist frame, 60 x 40 in.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Miguel Arzabe reviews Jake Longstreth: Free Range at Gregory Lind Gallery in San Francisco. For urban dwellers with the means and motivation to leave the city in[…..]

Shaping Abstraction at the de Young Museum in San Francisco

Oskar Fischinger. Rhythmic Tapestry, 1952; oil on canvas; 17 1/4 x 22 1/8 in. Courtesy of the Harriet and Maurice Gregg Collection of American Abstract Art and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Emily Swaim reviews Shaping Abstraction at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, California. Full disclosure—I have embarrassingly little education in abstract art. In fact, I chose[…..]

Ding Yi: Ivory Black at ShanghArt

Ding Yi. Appearance of Crosses-13, 2013; acrylic on canvas; 140 cm x 200 cm. Photo: Courtesy of the Artist and ShanghArt gallery Singapore.

“Grids punctured with crosses in varying patterns” is perhaps the best—and admittedly, the most simplistic—way of summing up Ding Yi’s oeuvre. Ivory Black at the ShanghArt gallery is his latest iteration of these basic, severely geometric forms, in varying shades of blue, black, and white hues, distinguished only by date and serial number. Like an astronomer’s chart of the night sky, Ding’s gridded, ordered forms[…..]

Clayton Colvin: New Way to Forget at beta pictoris

Clayton Colvin. Frontiersman, 2014; Acrylic, charcoal, pigment, and india ink
on linen on panel; 46 by 56 in.

Today, from our friends at BURNAWAY, we bring you a review of Clayton Colvin’s solo exhibition at beta pictoris gallery in Birmingham. Author Brett Levine notes, “[The exhibition] represents a strong commitment to the practice of painting as much as to its meaning.” This article was originally published on February 4, 2015. In “new way to forget,” Clayton Colvin’s third solo exhibition at beta pictoris gallery, we see the[…..]