Matt Siegle: Eddie’s Gulch at Park View

Matt Siegle. I wear denim and soiled ripstop. In the canyon I sport white athletic socks, hiking boots bought used from REI parking lot sale—no cheap Reeboks actually. My t-shirt shaded gray with lightly brassy pit stains. The sweat collects at my hairline at the top of my head. Drips the SPF 30 off the tip of my nose. Chem-UVA-UVB droplets collecting on my chest hair, slithering down my core and abdomen and each notch of my spine. With every passing sun-minute my cotton shirt clings to my torso, closely now. The shirt darkening with perspiration, through the weave of the belt and soaking the 501s, dampens my athletic compression shirts, quads, junk, grime, 2015. Acrylic on FSC-certified plasticized bags mounted to acrylic on linen; 43 x 43 in. Image courtesy of Park View and the Artist.

From our friends at Contemporary Art Review Los Angeles, today we bring you a review of Matt Siegle’s solo show at Park View. Author Lindsay Preston Zappas notes, “Maybe this show would’ve been more successful as a book.” This article was originally published on May 26, 2015. The wall pieces presented in Eddie’s Gulch, a new solo show by Matt Siegle at Park View, are very[…..]

Molly Dilworth: 2421 Miles at ALL RISE

Molly Dilworth. 2421 Miles, 2015; Courtesy of ALL RISE. Photo: Max Cleary

“When I worked for the Seattle Times fifteen years ago, our building overlooked this lot,” remarked Molly Dilworth during a recent artist talk. Her project, 2421 Miles, is a 52,000-square-foot earthwork (organized in collaboration with ALL RISE) located on a vacant city block in the heart of downtown. Returning to the site this spring was a homecoming of sorts for the Brooklyn-based artist. The ALL[…..]

Jacob Lawrence: Promised Land at the Cantor Arts Center

Jacob Lawrence. Ordeal of Alice, 1963; egg tempera on hardboard; 24 x 20 in. Gift of Dr. Herbert J. Kayden and Family in memory of Dr. Gabrielle H. Reem, 2013.98. © 2015 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy of the Cantor Arts Center, Palo Alto.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Lea Feinstein’s review of Jacob Lawrence: Promised Land at the Cantor Arts Center of Stanford University. Feinstein notes: “In drawing inspiration from iconic works of art history, Lawrence indicated that the stories he painted were part of the larger human context, not just specific to the African American experience.” This article was originally published on May 26, 2015.[…..]

Entang Wiharso: Never Say No at Singapore Tyler Print Institute

Entang Wiharso. Shelter: Forest of Eyes, 2015; Aluminium sheet, laser cut, C-type print; 127 × 184 × 3 cm. Courtesy of STPI.

Set in profile, a man casts a doleful eye on a smaller figure that perches on his forehead and pulls insistently at his tongue, while a miniature chainsaw balances threateningly on his head. The palm of his hand is pierced with a plant-like dagger, and little bodies tumble out feet-first from the bottom of his torso, already bearing knives and swords in preparation for a skirmish.[…..]

Verónica Bapé and José Porras: Filtros at Diagrama


Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. For the next four Sundays, our Shotgun Reviews will come from the finalists for the Daily Serving/Kadist Art Foundation Writing Fellowship in Mexico City. In today’s edition, author Marisol Rodríguez reviews the work of Verónica Bapé and José Porras at Diagrama in Mexico City. In[…..]

Tutti Frutti at Turps Gallery

Carla Busuttil. It Ended in Houghton, 2015; oil on canvas; 40 x 30 cm (15.75 x 11.81 in). Courtesy of the Artist and Turps Gallery, London. Photo: Adam Rompel

Painting is to art as royalty is to democracy; it defensively justifies its own significance while continuing to hold court. There are many reasons why painting continues in this coveted pretense, but perhaps it can be mainly attributed to the limitations of its purpose. Any painter knows that the enchantment of painting lies in its classification. No matter how far the medium is pushed, as[…..]

Amer Kobaslija at Arthur Roger Gallery

Amer Kobaslija. Studio with Chair and Ladder (J. Pollock, E. Hamptons), 2015; Oil on Plexiglas; 12 x 14 ¼ in.

In his 1971 essay “The Function of the Studio,” conceptual artist Daniel Buren defined the artist’s studio as a metadiscourse of “frames, envelopes, and limits” imposed upon the working artist in the age of advanced capitalism.[1] Claiming that this privileged space had become nothing more than an “ossified custom”—a “commercial depot” for curators and dealers to ship works out into the world (and thus detach[…..]