Painting

Trevor Shimizu: Again at 47 Canal and Rachel Mason: Starseeds at envoy enterprises

Rachel Mason. Yayoi Kusama, 2014; mixed media, dimensions varied. Courtesy of the artist and envoy enterprises.

Again, now at 47 Canal, presents a new set of paintings by Trevor Shimizu featuring more of the artist’s characteristically banal domestic caricatures. Of these, Shimizu’s sex paintings are his best. Featuring sketches of video monitors displaying stick figures engaged in BDSM porn, a vaginal close-up nestled next to a box of tissues, or a pop-up ad for penis enhancement, the paintings read as swiftly[.....]

Subverting the Sublime: Wondermountain at Penrith Regional Gallery

Hua Tunan, Fluorescent impression shanshui, 2013, spray paint, 300 x 500, image courtesy the artist

It seemed entirely appropriate that my journey to see Wondermountain at the Penrith Regional Gallery and Lewers Bequest was through rain, a concrete landscape of freeways and overpasses obscured by my windscreen wipers. I arrived beside the swollen Nepean River, the Blue Mountains shrouded in mist, reflecting on the continuing importance of shanshui (mountain/water) painting. A poetic approach to representing landscape evolving from the Tang Dynasty, the[.....]

Multiple Perspectives: New Works by Xie Xiaoze at Chambers Fine Art

Xie Xiaoze. October 19, 2007; Oil and Acrylic on Canvas, 60 x 72 in; March 16-17, 2013, I.H.T., 2013; Oil and Acrylic on Canvas; 80 x 93 in. Photo: Adam Monohon.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Adam Monohon reviews Multiple Perspectives: New Works by Xie Xiaoze at Chambers Fine Art in New York City. Mass media plays an inescapable role in everyday life. The[.....]

30 Americans at the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans

In a nod to Linda Nochlin’s famous query, Michele Wallace asked, “Why are there no great black artists?”[1] 30 Americans is the response to this question, a beautiful, rambunctious show that gathers the work of 31 African American artists. Unfortunately, 30 Americans, similar to Thelma Golden’s Freestyle in 2001, is not about a specific curatorial theory or thought, but rather a placing of African American[.....]

Sylvia Fein: Surreal Nature at Krowswork

Sylvia Fein. Crucial Eye, 2011; egg tempera on board, 20 x 24 inches. Courtesy the artist and Krowswork Gallery, Oakland.

Today from our partners at Art Practical we bring you Mary Anne Kluth‘s review of Sylvia Fein: Surreal Nature at Krowswork Gallery in Oakland, California. Kluth notes, “A true pleasure of the exhibition, and a mark of its success as a retrospective, is the opportunity to trace developing threads, such as a particular symbol, subject matter, or technique, through various works over long periods of time…the[.....]

Radcliffe Bailey: Maroons at Jack Shainman Gallery

The preserved crocodile carcass, pinned against a ratty tarp to form the centerpiece of a work called On Your Way Up, is as good a place as any to begin a review of Radcliffe Bailey’s exhibition Maroons at Jack Shainman gallery. Though purportedly on the ascent, this climber has clearly seen better days; its exposed finger bones, protruding between disintegrated flesh, seem unlikely to carry[.....]

Ramiro Gomez: Domestic Scenes at Charlie James Gallery

Ramiro Gomez. Woman Cleaning Shower
in Beverly Hills
(after David Hockney’s
Man Taking Shower in
Beverly Hills, 1964), 2013. 
Acrylic on canvas. 36 x
36 inches. Courtesy the artist and Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Osceola Refetoff.

Ramiro Gomez’s show at Charlie James Gallery has been gaining a lot of attention for his topical use of visual politics to introduce labor and immigration issues into the art discourse. Most notably, Gomez appropriates the image of David Hockney’s iconic painting A Bigger Splash (1967) and a group of smaller Hockneys from the same period in his own paintings. The jubilant splash of Hockney’s[.....]