Performance

Freestyle: Interview with Rashaad Newsome

Rashaad Newsome. King of Arms, 2013 (performance still); live procession in City Park, New Orleans. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Jena Cumbo.

Today, from our friends at Guernica, we bring you curator Laura Blereau in conversation with artist Rashaad Newsome. Newsome says, “I’m playing with gender and roles that are shifting as this elaborate allegory for transformation. The body can change. That’s ultimate emancipation, to just completely change your body, to change your physicality.” This article was originally published on March 17, 2014. Guernica: The kind of art that you create[…..]

Father Figures Are Hard to Find at nGbK

Rotimi Fani-Kayode. Nothing to Lose IX (Bodies of Experience), 1987; C-prints, 49 x 41 cm Courtesy of the artist, Autograph ABP, and nGbK, Berlin.

Surrounded by the works in Father Figures Are Hard to Find, fifty or so attendees sat on the concrete floor of neue Gesellschaft für bildende Kunst (nGbK), awaiting the lecture–performance Da Da Daddy Hasselhof by Mysti, who appeared in drag, wearing a cascading blonde wig and bright halter and miniskirt combo. Her academic talk began with a slow-building critique of object-making and market-driven aesthetics, and[…..]

Whose Culture Is Not Your Friend?

Photo: Kristen McWharter

Today from our friends at BmoreArt, we bring you Angela N. Carroll’s reflections on FlucT’s performance Culture Is Not Your Friend at Platform Gallery in Baltimore, MD. Carroll says of the performance, “Much of what I experienced was performative in the most mundane and expected ways: a critique of sexuality by embodying overtly sexed archetypes. But maybe that’s the point.” This article was originally published on February 12,[…..]

Connecting Intentionally: The Beginning of Blights Out

Blights out began in 2014 during Prospect.3: Notes for Now with Artist Lisa Sigal’s nstallations on houses in New Oreleans’ mid-city neighborhood. Courtesy of the Artist and Blights Out, New Orleans.

From our friends at Pelican Bomb, today we bring you an interview with Blights Out, a New Orleans project that “prioritizes transparency, interdisciplinary collaboration, community involvement, and creativity.” Blights Out is New York–based artist Lisa Sigal, New Orleans artist Carl Joe Williams, and arts activist Imani Jacqueline Brown. Author Rosemary Reyes says, “Blights Out looks to ignite conversations around the rapid economic development in New Orleans by ‘performing[…..]

He Yunchang: Water Forming Stone at Ink Studio

He Yunchang. Inner Sanctuary, 2015. Courtesy of INK Studio.

A clear and joyful light floods the inner gallery of Ink Studio in Beijing, where He Yunchang performed a series of three grueling new works in his exhibition Water Forming Stone. Light dances through candy-colored drinking glasses that are suspended in midair over a pedestal of simulated crystals and jade. It radiates off of the warm white walls cleverly composed of cardboard shipping boxes and[…..]

From the Archives – Women’s Work at Smith College Museum of Art

Carolee Schneeman. Eye Body #1, 1963–79; gelatin-silver print with hand coloring and scratching; 14 in x 11 1/2 in. Courtesy of Smith College Art Museum, purchased with the Judith Plesser Targan, class of 1953, Fund.

We were delighted to see art-world activists the Guerrilla Girls on the Late Show with Stephen Colbert to promote their exhibition at the Walker, which opened last week (on view until December 31, 2016). To round out the historical context of second-wave feminism from which the Guerrilla Girls emerged, today we bring you Lia Wilson’s review of Women’s Work: Feminist Art From the Collection at[…..]

Marilyn Arsem: 100 Ways to Consider Time at MFA Boston

Marilyn Arsem: 100 Ways to Consider Time at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, performance still. Image Courtesy the artist and the Museum of Fine Arts Boston.

I visited the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston on the 68th day of Marilyn Arsem’s 100-day-long performance exhibition, 100 Ways to Consider Time. The premise behind Arsem’s exhibition (which exists, it seems, as one piece or work) is that the artist will be on-site, situated in a gallery inside the museum, for each of the 100 days of the show. As the museum is[…..]