Performance

Anarchy, Tea, and After-Dinner Calligraphy: Interview with the Yangjiang Group

Yangjiang Group. Final Days, 2015; installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, wax and modified clothing installation,
dimensions variable. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists and Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou. Photo: Zan Wimberley

For contemporary Chinese artists Zheng Guogu, Chen Zaiyan, and Sun Qinglin—known as the Yangjiang Group—art is about social action and everyday life, including the practice of calligraphy, shopping, football, gambling, drinking and  eating. They believe art and life are entirely connected, resisting the commercialism of the art market and the over-intellectualization of art. Their latest project, Actions for Tomorrow, includes a live event, Tea Office, as a[…..]

The New Endurance of Linda Mary Montano, Part 1

Linda Mary Montano with Tehching Hsieh. Art/Life: One Year Performance 1983–1984 (Rope Piece), 1983-1984 (still); performance documentation. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our partner site Art Practical, we bring you an excerpt of Patricia Maloney‘s conversation with artist Linda Montano, who says, “I am most authentic when I am performing. I am really one hundred percent there. I can’t say that about any other aspect of my life.” This interview was originally published on January 19, 2015. Linda Mary Montano, born in 1942, is a[…..]

Loris Gréaud: The Unplayed Notes Museum at Dallas Contemporary

Loris.

From our friends at Glasstire, today we bring you Christina Rees’ review of Loris Gréaud’s current solo exhibition at Dallas Contemporary. Rees describes the choreographed destruction of the work and characterizes the show as “a partial and contrived ruin,” noting that neither the artist nor the visitors seem invested. This article was originally published on January 19, 2015.  I suppose in the event of a chemical attack[…..]

Pierre Huyghe at LACMA

Pierre Huyghe. Untitled (Human Mask), 2014. Film. Courtesy of the artist; Hauser and Wirth, London; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York; Esther Schipper, Berlin; Anna Lena, Paris. © Pierre Huyghe

There is a scene in Pierre Huyghe’s shadowy, dreamlike film The Host and the Cloud (2010) in which a woman produces a black rabbit from an unmarked box. No magician, she handles the unexpected animal with a mixture of bewilderment and acute apprehension. Later in the film, she confronts the event during hypnotherapy; then, in a key conversion, she watches her own analysis session performed[…..]

From Beijing: Beijing Voice and Zhang Xiaotao at Pékin Fine Arts

Beijing Voice 'Unlived By What is Seen' installation view courtesy Pace Beijing

There has been noise of late about the supposedly derivative nature of contemporary art, about questionable curatorial practices, and about the piratical behavior of the art market. “Zombie Formalism” and “Crapstraction” are glib, voguish—although, it must be said, amusing—terms that have been thrown around. Whatever you may think about this critique of current tendencies in abstract painting, it seems that all is not well in the world[…..]

But What You Want Is Far Away at the Oakland Museum of California

Phoebe Osborne. God Sees Everything, November 7, 2014 (performance still); Courtesy of the Artist and the Oakland Museum of California. Photo: Charlie Villyard.

In God Sees Everything, directed and choreographed by Phoebe Osborne, a complex weave of everything Californian coalesces.

#Hashtags – Locating Techonology: Therapeutic Bodies

Shana Moulton and Nick Hallett, featuring Daisy Press. Whispering Pines 10, 2012; performance at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Courtesy of the Artist and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Genevieve Quick’s consideration of performances by Mika Rottenberg and Shana Moulton. The author notes: “As early media artists and feminists have done, Rottenberg and Moulton construct imaginative narratives that probe the unsettling relationship between the body, screens, technology, and contemporary life.” This article was originally published on October 15, 2014. Mika Rottenberg’s and Shana Moulton’s absurdist[…..]