Performance

Boom: The Art of Resistance at Random Parts

Amara T. Smith, Ellen Sebastian Chang & collaborators. House/Full of Black Women
2016-ongoing
Multiple sites, Oakland, CA
“Now You See Me” video documentation by Ginika Oruche
Original lantern used in performance with replica veil material

Impeccably curated by artist–organizer Leslie Dreyer at Random Parts gallery, Boom: The Art of Resistance is an exhibition that does not advertise its impact, and it could be mistaken for “scrappy” if one ignored the precision of the show and the assumptions jammed into that word. Installed in the small storefront/apartment space in Oakland, a few of the show’s works are in the well-used kitchen,[…..]

Joan Jonas: From Away at DHC ART

Installation view, Joan Jonas: From Away, 2016, DHC/ART. Joan Jonas, They Come to us Without a Word (Wind), 2015. Multimedia Installation (site-specific adaptation). Originally commissioned for the U.S. Pavilion of the 56th Venice Biennale by the MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Courtesy of The Kramlich Collection, San Francisco. © DHC/ART Foundation for Contemporary Art. Photo: Richard-Max Tremblay.

As psycho-historian, I try to diagnose the schizophrenia of Western civilization from its images, in an autobiographical reflex. (Joan Jonas, The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things) Joan Jonas’ retrospective exhibition From Away occupies two buildings at DHC/ART in Montreal. Arriving at the basement’s miniature cinema felt like entering a cauldron of the Jonasian universe, and moving up and down in the tightly vertical first building[…..]

Summer Session – Do You Believe in Television? Chris Burden and TV

Chris Burden, still from TV Hijack, 1972. Photo: G. Beydler. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery, © Chris Burden.

This Summer Session we’re thinking about celebrity, which necessarily includes the ways in which celebrity is most easily produced and consumed—that is, we’re also thinking about television. Today we bring you an excerpt from an article published on East of Borneo by Nick Stillman, regarding Chris Burden’s television performances of the 1970s, which used the medium of television to challenge the consumerist ethos it perpetuated, unlike its complicit[…..]

Be the Kill-Joy: Interview with DarkMatter

dark-matter-5-top

Today, from our friends at Guernica, we bring you an interview with queer South Asian performance-art duo DarkMatter. Author Kevin St. John says of their performance at Mercury Lounge, “The evening’s performance at times resembled a political rally, a downtown drag act, an agit-prop polemic, a stand-up routine, and a traditional poetry reading. The duo performed much of the text together, talking over one another, jumping[…..]

A Feast of Astonishments: Charlotte Moorman and the Avant-Garde, 1960s–1980s at the Block Museum of Art

The Pablo Casals mask used by Charlotte Moorman in the performance of Jim McWilliams’s C. Moorman in Drag, 1973. Courtesy of Charlotte Moorman Archive, Northwestern University Library.

The Juilliard-trained musician and performance artist Charlotte Moorman, the so-called topless cellist, never shied away from the spotlight. In addition, as a monographic exhibition at Northwestern University’s Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art demonstrates, Moorman’s work as a cunning and forceful impresario contributed significantly to the international visibility of New York’s burgeoning avant-garde music scene beginning in the ’60s. A Feast of Astonishments: Charlotte[…..]

Interview with Sarah Rara

Sarah Rara is a Los Angeles–based artist who works with video, film, photography, and performance. She is also a contributing member of the band Lucky Dragons. Rara was most recently an artist in residence at Headlands Center for the Arts, where she worked on a new video, Broken Solar, and a libretto for a new opera, Neglected Treaty, that considers the sonic impacts of climate change[…..]

Freestyle: Interview with Rashaad Newsome

Rashaad Newsome. King of Arms, 2013 (performance still); live procession in City Park, New Orleans. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Jena Cumbo.

Today, from our friends at Guernica, we bring you curator Laura Blereau in conversation with artist Rashaad Newsome. Newsome says, “I’m playing with gender and roles that are shifting as this elaborate allegory for transformation. The body can change. That’s ultimate emancipation, to just completely change your body, to change your physicality.” This article was originally published on March 17, 2014. Guernica: The kind of art that you create[…..]