Barbara Kasten: Stages at ICA Philadelphia

(from left to right) Barbara Kasten. Studio Construct 125, 2011; archival pigment print; 53 3/4 x 43 3/4 in.; Studio Construct 32, 1986; Silver dye bleach print; 37 x 29 1/2 in. Courtesy of the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania.

At the entrance to Barbara Kasten: Stages at the Philadelphia Institute of Contemporary Art, there is a corner-placed grouping of five photographs. Four early Polaroids made in 1982 and 1983 are on the right; with their geometric shapes and pastel colors, they would fit easily into the reigning design aesthetic of the 1980s. On the left is the 2007 silver-dye bleach print Studio Construct 17,[…..]

After Utopia at the Singapore Art Museum

Shen Shaomin. Summit (detail) silica gel simulation, acrylic and fabric, dimensions variable, Singapore Art Museum collection, image courtesy Singapore Art Museum

After Utopia: Revisiting the Ideal in Asian Contemporary Art at the Singapore Art Museum (SAM) explores the dissonance between our innermost longings and the contemporary world we have created. Gunter Grass said, rather gloomily, that melancholy and utopia are heads and tails of the same coin. Imagining perfection, we confront the contradiction between the Arcadia of our imagination and the imperfect realities of our everyday. Featuring eighteen[…..]

Fan Mail: John Tierney

John Tierney. Elvis is on the Building, Palm Springs, 2013; oil on canvas; 20 x 16 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

John Tierney’s paintings have a distinct relationship to cinema. Hollywood, California, and the greater Los Angeles area are awash in a rich and intense light that seems to linger over everything with an endless glow, a light as potent as the dreams and realities of fame and stardom promised by the movie companies that populate the city. For a representational painter such as Tierney, the[…..]

Ten Years Gone at the New Orleans Museum of Art

Willie Birch. Crawfish Dwelling. 2009. Bronze. 6 x 5.5 x 4 inches. Image courtesy of Willie Birch and the Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans, LA.

In the aftermath of a catastrophe, memorialization and remembrance are inevitably tied to forms of forgetting. These often take the shape of reactionary modes that proclaim an urgent desire to smooth over the eruptive, unresolved conflicts that shape our collective past and place them into digestible modes of representation.[1] However, for the communities that bear witness to the impact of a disastrous event, forgetting is[…..]

Environmental Impact at the Hilliard University Art Museum

Edward Burtynsky. Oxford Tire Pile #2, Westley, California. 1999. Chromogenic color print. 40 x 50 inches. Image courtesy of Tom Thomsen Art Gallery, Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada.

The majesty of our planet—its sublime beauty, biological diversity, and ability to instigate powerful modes of metaphysical reflection within its human inhabitants—remains a constant motif in the history of Western art. The paintings of Claude Lorrain, Rembrandt, Caspar David Friedrich, and George Inness are enduring reminders of the aesthetic richness of the genre. The sensual pleasures that the natural world incites and the darker forces[…..]

Night Begins the Day: Rethinking Space, Time, and Beauty at the Contemporary Jewish Musuem

Laurent Grasso. Soleil Noir, 2014; 16mm film, looped; 11:40. Courtesy of the Artist, Galerie Perrotin, and the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Mary Coyne reviews Night Begins the Day: Rethinking Space, Time, and Beauty at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco.  Night Begins the Day is a meditative,[…..]

Portraits and Other Likenesses from SFMOMA at the Museum of the African Diaspora

Mickalene Thomas. Sista Sista Lady Blue, 2007; chromogenic print; 40 3/8 x 48 1/2 in. Collection of SFMOMA; gift of Campari USA. © Mickalene Thomas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Katherine Du Tiel.

“…In reimagining traditions of portraiture, the artists featured not only reinsert black subjects into the pictorial frame, they also redefine these creative traditions as inherently mutable and, as such, capable of representing complex subjectivities that exist beyond the boundaries of race, gender, sexuality, and class.” From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Anton Stuebner’s review of Portraits and Other Likenesses from SFMOMA. This article was[…..]