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“Rocks & Clocks” at Ambach & Rice

Since sitting down six minutes ago, my iPhone has buzzed no less than eight times. E-mail. E-mail. Text message. E-mail. Breaking news notification. Follow up text message. Reminder alarm. E-mail. Approve the attached contract to begin production. Bombing suspect hospitalized. What’s the address for tomorrow? Please send details for exhibition. Go to bank. John Doe wants to be your friend! Despite this electronic outburst, I[.....]

Blanking Out: Will Rogan at Altman Siegal Gallery

Jazz great Miles Davis once said, “Music exists in the spaces between the notes.” Language provokes us to name and describe empty spaces—like those that exist at the intersection of thought and memory. In Blanking Out, Will Rogan’s exhibition at Altman Siegel Gallery, a combination of sculptures and two-dimensional works reveals that the negative spaces are as important as the objects that create them. In[.....]

(Made by) PICASSO AND (owned in) CHICAGO

Trying to critique a blockbuster museum show like “Picasso and Chicago” at the Art Institute of Chicago is kind of like trying to offer thoughtful criticism of Coca-Cola; at this point, there’s not much that can be said that would enhance or diminish the iconic status of either of these monolithic cultural forces. So why bother? Here are a few personal thoughts and observations about[.....]

Things Happened on the Island: Lam Tung-pang’s Floating World

Lam Tung-pang / Things Happened on the Island / Acrylics, charcoal, pencil, scale model and wooden toys on plywood / H 244 x 700 x W 60cm / Acrylics, charcoal, pencil, scale model and wooden toys on plywood / 2013 image courtesy the artist

In early 2011, when I visited a number of young Hong Kong artists’ in their studios, they spoke of their frustration at the focus of curators on art from mainland China, and of their sense of being a ‘poor relation’. Add to that the tensions simmering just below the surface as cashed–up mainlanders poured into Hong Kong, and it seemed a recipe for resentment. In[.....]

Geng Jianyi: The Artist Researcher

Born in 1962 of parents who were attached to the Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Geng Jianyi grew up in a country shaped by rigid, state-mandated structures that had, by the late 1960s to the early ‘70s, fallen a long way short of the idealistic socialist Chinese state that Mao Zedong had envisioned. Where solidary socialism was intended to create commitment to the system by way[.....]

The XEROX BOOK

In December of 1968, Seth Siegelaub and Jack Wendler published The XEROX BOOK, an exhibition produced entirely in book form. The project included seven contributing conceptual artists: Carl Andre, Robert Barry, Joseph Kosuth, Sol LeWitt, Douglas Huebler, Robert Morris and Lawrence Weiner. The Kadist Art Foundation in San Francisco recently spoke to Jack Wendler about The XEROX BOOK offering a unique glimpse into the history[.....]

Ronald Ventura: Recyclables

Ronald Ventura’s latest suite of works, produced at the Singapore Tyler Print Institute, examines how humanity relates to the environment, and how we often leave in our wake, a trail of destruction. Recyclables is Ventura’s show of lithographs, cast paper sculptures and paper relief on canvas produced from the discarded waste of urbanity, which he has recycled into a visual mélange of apocalyptic tales drawn[.....]