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Valentina Vannicola: Dante’s Inferno

Inferno. Tolfa, Rome, Italy, April 2010 February 2011. ### Infer

In Dante’s Inferno Italian artist Valentina Vannicola merges staged photography with socially engaged practice, resulting in a rich body of work reminiscent of the postdramatic theater of Romeo Castellucci and the Societas Rafaello Sanzio. Using non-professional performers from her hometown of Tolfa, north of Rome, Vannicola has constructed absurdist scenes recreating Dante’s journey through the strata of hell. While the outcome could easily have been[…..]

If the World Changed: Singapore Biennale 2013

Teamlab. Peace Can Be Realized Even Without Order, 2012; interactive digital installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Singapore Art Museum.

Premised on the obliquely hypothetical question “What if the world changed?”, the Singapore Biennale 2013 (SB2013) is presented as a deconstructed entity centered on allusive keywords—or “tags” in internetspeak—such as “histories,” “intervention,” and “materiality” in order to highlight the transmutative and the transformative qualities of the art produced in the region. With a collaborative team of 27 curators instead of an artistic director helming the show,[…..]

Séripop: Looming at YYZ

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I first came across Montréal artist duo Séripop (Chloe Lum and Yannick Desranleau) a number of years ago when I was more embedded in the indie music scene here in Canada. In this sphere, the pair are known for their layered, DIY gig posters and refreshingly offbeat graphic design work. Despite their disregard for the formal rules of graphic design, Lum and Desranleau possess an intuitive[…..]

The Fun of the Fair: Sydney Contemporary

Kim Joon, Bird Land - Chrysler, 2008, digital print, 47 x 83 inches, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Hong Kong, New York, Singapore

Depending on who you ask, anywhere between eight thousand and thirteen thousand people attended the vernissage of the world’s newest art fair, Sydney Contemporary. By the end of three and a half days, the fair had attracted almost twenty-nine thousand visitors eager to see the offerings from eighty-three Australian and international galleries, presenting the work of more than three hundred artists. The physical scale was[…..]

Fan Mail: PUTPUT

Objective Ambition #1, 2012; sculpture; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

PUTPUT is the Swiss and Danish artist duo of Stefan Friedli and Ulrik Martin Larsen. Though they primarily work in photography, their medium seems secondary—it’s merely the most effective form for documenting their work. The duo re-imagines objects and captures eccentric still-life setups, photographs, and object re-imaginings that open up an entire world of potential visual and sculptural combinations. The objects they create range from[…..]

Homecoming! Committee’s Post Communiqué at the Dallas Museum of Art

Homecoming! Committee. ARTFORUM, 1963 (2013); Modified magazine pages and paper; 10.5 x 10.5 x .5 inches. Courtesy of Homecoming! Committee "archives."

The contrast between established arts institutions and alternative spaces is often stark—different areas of town, different audiences in attendance, different coverage (if any) from very different publications. Artforum has a ten-page spread on the latest from Martin Kippenberger, while the arts and culture section of a local blog has two hundred words on an emerging artist. But the rare moments when the two worlds collide[…..]

AFRICOBRA: Philosophy at the Logan Center

Barbara Jones-Hogu, "Unite," 1968-71; screenprint; 25.5 x 35 in. Courtesy of the artist and Logan Center for the Arts.

The assembly of works by AFRICOBRA (African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists), a collective of African American Chicago-based artists active during the 1960s and 1970s, now on display at the Logan Center for the Arts could fairly be described as a time capsule; it is more important for the moment it captures than for its contents. In addition to this exhibition, titled AFRICOBRA: Philosophy, the collective currently has two other[…..]