Reviews

Hao Ni: Ghost Hit Wall at Yellow Peril Gallery

Hao Ni. window IV, 2015 (detail); windows, stickers, tape, paper, spray paint on glass, acrylic paint on plastic; 48 x 60 x10 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

To enter Hao Ni’s exhibition Ghost Hit Wall, currently on view at Yellow Peril Gallery in Providence, Rhode Island, is to step into a space where the familiar becomes strange and the strange becomes eerily, disconcertingly familiar. Bracingly present yet vaguely surreal, the works—ranging from painting and sculpture to video and mixed-media installation—are installed as a cohesive whole. Yet, as this incisive exhibition makes clear, cohesion[…..]

Portraits and Other Likenesses from SFMOMA at the Museum of the African Diaspora

Mickalene Thomas. Sista Sista Lady Blue, 2007; chromogenic print; 40 3/8 x 48 1/2 in. Collection of SFMOMA; gift of Campari USA. © Mickalene Thomas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Katherine Du Tiel.

“…In reimagining traditions of portraiture, the artists featured not only reinsert black subjects into the pictorial frame, they also redefine these creative traditions as inherently mutable and, as such, capable of representing complex subjectivities that exist beyond the boundaries of race, gender, sexuality, and class.” From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Anton Stuebner’s review of Portraits and Other Likenesses from SFMOMA. This article was[…..]

Leo Saul Berk: Structure and Ornament at Frye Art Museum

Leo Saul Berk. Structure and Ornament, 2014; plywood, acrylic; 120 x 213 x 59 in. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Mark Woods.

Can architecture transform lives? Can it transform us? These questions lay the foundation for Structure and Ornament, a solo exhibition of work by Seattle-based artist Leo Saul Berk, on view at Frye Art Museum. Presented in a meandering array of multimedia sculpture, site-specific installation, and video with sound, Berk’s ongoing series is a reflection on his childhood home in Aurora, Illinois—a site formative to his personal and artistic growth. In the[…..]

Tseng Kwong Chi at Grey Art Gallery

Tseng Kwong Chi. New York, New York (World Trade Center), 1979, from the East Meets West series; Gelatin silver print, printed 2014; 36 x 36 in. Courtesy of Muna Tseng Dance Projects, Inc., New York

Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera is the first major retrospective on the artist, co-organized by the Chrysler Gallery and NYU’s Grey Art Gallery. Bringing Tseng’s body of work to the fore is an important and overdue project; his career was regularly eclipsed by his friends, whose trajectories characterized the 1980s New York City art market boom, most notably Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring.[…..]

28 Chinese at the Asian Art Museum

Zhang Huan. To Raise the Water Level in a Fishpond, 1997; chromogenic print on Fuji archival paper; 40 ¾ in x 60 ½ in. Courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection, Miami. © Zhang Huan.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of 28 Chinese at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Author Jing Cao notes: “The best works in 28 Chinese take as their subject [a] tension between material conditions and ideological constructs—between things and meanings—to offer new ways of observing the contemporary condition.” This article was originally published on June 25, 2015. 28 Chinese at the Asian[…..]

Simon Denny: The Innovator’s Dilemma at MoMA PS1

Simon Denny. New Management, 2014; installation view, Portikus, Frankfurt. Photo: Helena Schlichting. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Startup culture is ripe for satire. The tech industry’s social and economic dominance makes it a necessary target, and its penchant for jargon-heavy, wildly inflated rhetoric makes it an easy one. Mike Judge’s HBO sitcom, Silicon Valley, deftly picks the low-hanging fruit, but it hardly needs to. The elevator pitches of most weak-to-average startups on the venture-capital trail, quixotically ascribing revolutionary potential to the most[…..]

Hidden Histories in Latin American Art at the Phoenix Art Museum

Lopez.

In a small, dark gallery at the back of the Phoenix Art Museum is a thoughtful exhibition of artworks with a global interest in subjects often left unspoken. A mysterious low rumbling of vibrating glass sets the stage for Hidden Histories in Latin American Art: Teresa Margolles’ La Búsqueda (The Search) (2014) is an installation consisting of glass panels plastered with missing-persons posters transported from[…..]