Reviews

Best of 2014 – #Hashtags: Sweet and Low

Kara Walker. A Subtlety, 2014. Site-specific installation at Domino Sugar Factory, Brooklyn, NY. Commissioned by Creative Time. Photo by Rajath Vikram.

Here at Daily Serving we count down the days to the New Year by presenting you with our best writing from the outgoing year. Our first selection, from our 2014 #Hashtags column, comes from Lia Wilson: “Anuradha Vikram’s investigation of Kara Walker’s The Marvelous Sugar Baby is an incredibly deft navigation of the entanglement of race, gender, class, labor, capitol, and representation operating within the work[…..]

Moving Walls 22 / Watching You, Watching Me at Open Society Foundations-New York

Mishka Henner. Dutch Landscapes, 2011;
Archival pigment print.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Mary Coyne reviews Watching You, Watching Me at Open Society Foundations in New York City. Edward Snowden’s revelatory findings of pervasive surveillance by the NSA fundamentally changed[…..]

Howard Fried: The Decomposition of My Mother’s Wardrobe at The Box

Howard Fried. The Decomposition of My Mother's Wardrobe, 2014-2015. Courtesy of the Artist and The Box Gallery. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio.

Carefully orchestrated yet unpredictable, the project has no predetermined solution, only possible actions.

From the Archives – Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties at the Brooklyn Museum

David Hammons. The Door, 1969; wood, acrylic sheet, and pigment construction, 79 x 48 x 15 in. Courtesy of Collection of Friends, the Foundation of the California African American Museum, Los Angeles.

Today from our archives, we bring you Lia Wilson’s review of a recent exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. Wilson explains the importance of this exhibition: “Witness does the essential and painful work of revealing how an inadequate visual cultural record can come to mirror inadequate social reform. There can be no greater demonstration of the need for a more diverse and inclusive art-historical canon and[…..]

Disobedient Objects at the Victoria & Albert Museum

Herman Wallace. Fuck the LAW. 2008. Chrome-plated steel pendant. Dimensions Unknown. Private Collection. Photo: Jordan Amirkhani.

Sitting just inside the Great Hall and squeezed between two major retrospective exhibitions of wedding dresses and fashion photographs at the Victoria & Albert in London sits Disobedient Objects, a small but powerful show examining the materials, methods, and inventions of political dissent across the world since the late 1970s. Rich and diverse in its choice of objects, the one-room gallery places a strong emphasis[…..]

All That Glitters Is Not Gold at the Phoenix Art Museum

Alfred A. Cohn. Untitled, c. 1920; platinum print. Courtesy of the Artist and the Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Christina Nafziger reviews All That Glitters Is Not Gold: Platinum Photography from the Center for Creative Photography at the Phoenix Art Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. In a world[…..]

But What You Want Is Far Away at the Oakland Museum of California

Phoebe Osborne. God Sees Everything, November 7, 2014 (performance still); Courtesy of the Artist and the Oakland Museum of California. Photo: Charlie Villyard.

In God Sees Everything, directed and choreographed by Phoebe Osborne, a complex weave of everything Californian coalesces.