Reviews

2015 Triennial: Surround Audience at the New Museum

Josh Kline. Freedom, 2015; installation view, 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience, 2015, New Museum, New York. Courtesy of the Artist and 47 Canal, New York.

Surround Audience, the latest triennial exhibition at the New Museum, surveys fifty-one emerging artists, from twenty-five countries, whose practices are informed by their lived experience immersed in the digital landscape. The triennial has always billed itself as a predictive rather than reflective survey, and this iteration is no exception, with a focus on the culture of the immediate present and where it’s hurtling. Though the[…..]

Linear Abstraction at the SCAD Museum of Art

Phillip Stearns. Linear Abstraction, 2015; installation view. Gutstein Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia. Courtesy of the Savannah College of Art and Design. Photo: Marc Newton.

Abstraction is dead! Long live abstraction! In Linear Abstraction, the SCAD Museum of Art negotiates the status of nonrepresentational work as it exists in the 21st century and includes work in various media, including painting, sculpture, photography, and digital formats. While the exhibition seeks to trace commonalities between contemporary practices by engaging somewhat diverse uses or ideas of lines, the resulting effect points succinctly to[…..]

Jake Longstreth: Free Range at Gregory Lind Gallery

Jake Longstreth. Free Range, 2014; Oil on canvas in artist frame, 60 x 40 in.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Miguel Arzabe reviews Jake Longstreth: Free Range at Gregory Lind Gallery in San Francisco. For urban dwellers with the means and motivation to leave the city in[…..]

Alec Soth: Songbook at Fraenkel Gallery

Alec Soth. Bree, Liberty Cheer All-Stars, Corsicana, Texas, 2012; pigment print; 39 x 52 in. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. © Alec Soth.

Today we bring you a review of Alec Soth: Songbook at Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco. Writing for Art Practical, author Danica Willard Sachs notes that “The project marks a departure from [Soth’s] usual reliance on narrative annotations to explain his images; it’s a more free-flowing, less didactic viewing experience.” This article was originally published on March 26, 2015. In twenty-one black-and-white pigment prints from the larger photobook Songbook,[…..]

Gilbert & George: Utopian Pictures at Arndt Gallery

Gilbert & George. God Guides Us, 2014; 151cm × 191cm. Photo: Courtesy of Arndt gallery and the artists.

In the 21st-century lexicon of urban development, the term utopia has all but vanished from the descriptors of a contemporary city. It’s more comfortably consigned to the archaic vocabulary of 18th-century academia. Yet it remains a silent ideological underpinning of economic policies, an elusive goal that governments strive toward but leave unacknowledged—seen, for instance, in laws forbidding “transgressive” behavior, constant political entanglements, or even in perpetual urban[…..]

Nate Boyce: Polyscroll at YBCA

Nate Boyce. Polyscroll II, 2015 (still); HD video. Courtesy of the Artist and Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Nate Boyce’s solo show at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. Author Monica Westin notes: “The overall effect is akin to walking around a sculpture in a completely unanchored plane in space that occasionally drifts into and out of alignment with other planes and other worlds.” This article was[…..]

Barbara Kruger: Early Works at Skarstedt Gallery

Barbara Kruger. Untitled (Don't buy us with apologies), 1986; photostat print in artist's frame; 48 3/4 x

54 7/8 in. (123.8 x 139.5 cm.) framed. Courtesy of the Artist and Skarstedt.

It’s a funny thing to be able to go back and reconsider an artist’s early works after thirty years, partly because the time capsule of memory remembers the work in the context in which it was made. Viewing the work again in the present reflects the context of that prior time as it’s understood now. The aggressively fast-paced 1980s are faster in memory than they[…..]