From the Archives – The Rape of the Sabine Women: Eve Sussman and Rufus Corporation at Impronte Art

Eve Sussman | Rufus Corporation, Annette with Rabbits, 2005. Photo by Benedikt Partenheimer. Courtesy of Impronte contemporary art.

We are thinking through the origins of democracy and systemic racism and misogyny.

Carmen Winant: Pictures of Women Working at Skibum MacArthur

Carmen Winant. Pictures of Women Working, 2016; installation view. Courtesy of Skibum MacArthur, Los Angeles. Photo: Brica Wilcox.

The question of work becomes complex when one asks who is doing it, and for whom. The precarious labor of domestic chores gone unfairly compensated, the frequently banal performance of activism and demonstration, sex work—these labors remain concerns in our current social and economic spheres, and reflect a problematic, historical trajectory that often fails to incorporate and value unseen, marginalized work and workers.[1] In Pictures[…..]

Gerardo Tan: Hablon Redux and Other Transcriptions at Random Parts

Gerardo Tan. Turntable Paintings, 2016; vinyl, acrylic; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Random Parts. Photo: Maria Porges.

What does it mean to transcribe a work from one medium to another? Is the result a kind of translation, a form of documentation, a new piece of art, or all three? In a fascinating range of media—painting, video, found objects, weaving, and sound—Manila-based artist Gerardo Tan investigates these questions through three different projects presented in his solo exhibition Hablon Redux and Other Transcriptions at[…..]

#Hashtags – Toward the Black Museum

Hammer Projects: Simone Leigh, September 17, 2016–January 8, 2017. Installation view, courtesy of Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest.

#museums #race #representation #institutional critique The recent controversy over Kelley Walker’s exhibition Direct Drive at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, and the departure of that exhibition’s curator, Jeffrey Uslip, was another reminder that museums are not built and programmed for all audiences alike. As this column has taken up questions of race in the museum on numerous occasions (and class in the museum, and[…..]

From the Archives – Bruce Conner: Somebody Else’s Prints at the Ulrich Museum of Art

Bruce Conner, Bombhead, 2002. Pigmented inkjet print on paper, 32 x 25 in. Courtesy Magnolia Editions, Oakland, CA. © 2014 Conner Family Trust, San Francisco / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

As the artist’s first comprehensive retrospective moves from coast to coast, we’ve got Bruce Conner on our minds. Bruce Conner: It’s All True opened first at the Museum of Modern Art (and closed in early October) and now travels back to Conner’s old stomping grounds in the Bay Area to open on October 29 at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Ashley Stull Meyers’ 2014 review of[…..]

Anywhere But Here at Bétonsalon Center for Art and Research

May 1, 1931—Thousands of people gather in the forest of Vincennes in the eastern outskirts of Paris to stroll around newly built re-creations of pagodas, palaces, and huts while observing the forest’s temporary tenants: whole tribes and families brought in from the French colonies in Africa and Asia. Meanwhile in Paris, the Surrealists are at work staging a counter-exhibition and publishing “The Truth About the[…..]

Africa Forecast: Fashioning Contemporary Life at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

Fabiola Jean-Louis. Amina, 2016; archival pigment print; 29 x 28.5 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Alan Avery Art Company (Atlanta, GA).

Spelman College Museum of Fine Art’s current exhibition, Africa Forecast: Fashioning Contemporary Life, presents a small but dynamic assemblage of twenty designers and artists who blur the line between fine art and fashion from across the globe. Co-curated by Spelman Museum’s own Dr. Andrea Barnwell Brownlee and Dr. Erika Dalya Massaquoi to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the institution, this exhibition embodies the curatorial commitments[…..]