Reviews

Nikita Kadan: Limits of Responsibility at Waterside Contemporary

Nikita Kadan. Protection of Plants, 2014; collage; 39.5 x 54.5 cm (15.5 x 21.46 in). Courtesy of the Artist and Waterside Contemporary, London. NFC.

Hope is a powerful catalyst for change, fueling courage and idealism in equal parts. It projects a vision of a future that is better than the present. Once people are moved with hope, extraordinary things can happen. But what happens to hope when a people are continuously subjugated for over six centuries? If Kiev-based artist Nikita Kadan’s quietly intense installation at Waterside Contemporary is an[…..]

Double Life at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston

Jérôme Bel. Performance Still from Veronique Doisneau. 2004. Image courtesy of the artist.

In Double Life, now on view at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, it is clear that the city is in the midst of becoming one of the most interesting and significant locations for performance art in the southeast—a statement confirmed by the national attention given recently to the performance art collective DiverseWorks, the emergence of the Lone Star Explosion International Performance Art Biennale in 2012, and the[…..]

Oscar Muñoz: Sedimentaciones at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

Oscar Muñoz. Sedimentaciones, 2015; installation view. Courtesy of the Artist, the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa, and the Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection, Miami.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Danny Olda reviews Oscar Muñoz: Sedimentaciones at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum in Tampa.  The gallery is dark save for the surface of three[…..]

From the Archives – Coco Fusco: Observations of Predation in Humans at the Studio Museum in Harlem

Coco Fusco. Observations of Predation in Humans, 2013. Performance at the Studio Museum of Harlem.

Today, from the archives, we bring you Lia Wilson‘s review of Coco Fusco’s Observations of Predation in Humans, originally performed at the Studio Museum of Harlem in December 2013 for Radical Presence, a survey of performance work by black visual artists. This month, Fusco will be resuming her role as the legendary female chimpanzee psychologist Dr. Zira at Participant Inc., as part of the Performing[…..]

The Disappeared at Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography

Zoë Heyn-Jones. Atitlán 1 (Feliz Viaje), 2014; ink-jet print on celluloid; 36 x 150 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography.

In The Disappeared, artists Tatiana Grigorenko and Zoë Heyn-Jones rewrite history through still and moving images. In the current exhibition at Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography, Grigorenko and Heyn-Jones negotiate their relationships with their ancestors and origins through altered photographs and Super 8 film. With disarming honesty, they interrogate the ways in which their private memories and personal realities overlap and diverge. This fissure between[…..]

The Return to Reason at Gallery Wendi Norris

Stephen Gill. Talking to Ants, 2009–12; pigment archival paper print, image 40 x 40 in., paper 44 x 44 in., edition of 5 plus 2 AP. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of the current group show at Gallery Wendi Norris in San Francisco. Author Danica Willard Sachs writes: “In a moment when the commonplace assumption is that photographs are digitally manipulated, the exhibition shines in its success at reminding viewers that wonder can still be found in the analog realm of the darkroom, or[…..]

Justin Mortimer: Sevastopol at Future Perfect

Justin Mortimer. Jabalya, 2014; oil on canvas; 50 x 70 cm (detail). Photo: courtesy of the Artist and Future Perfect Asia, Singapore.

Annexed by Russia in 1782 during the reign of Catherine the Great, Sevastopol became an important naval base to the Russian Black Sea Fleet only to fall decades later to allied British, French, and Turkish troops during the Crimean War (1853–56) after a long, protracted siege that lasted eleven months. During the existence of the Soviet Union, the famous fortress city was transferred to the Ukrainian[…..]