Reviews

Eric Yahnker: Noah’s Yacht at Zevitas Marcus

Eric Yahnker. Abe Lincorn, 2015; colored pencil on paper. Pierced Piety, 2015, colored pencil on paper. Shell Game, 2015 (detail); 314 Purell hand sanitizer bottles, spire seashells. Courtesy of the Artist and Zevitas Marcus.

Eric Yahnker’s large-scale colored pencil drawings are often satirical, social, and political in nature. The Los Angeles–based artist, who has worked both for South Park and as a journalist, views himself as a political cartoonist in the often patronizing and self-involved art world. Many of his previous shows have felt like incredible, offbeat, anarchic versions of the very best in political cartoons or Dadaist reinterpretations[…..]

From the Archives – Malick Sidibé

Malick Sidibé. Untitled, 1969/2004; silver gelatin print, hand-painted wooden frame. Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

This week at Daily Serving we’re remembering the life and work of photographer Malick Sidibé (1935–2016), whose studio portraiture and candid images of nightlife in Mali during the 1960s and ’70s recorded a powerful time for the recently liberated country. As author Lia Wilson comments in her 2014 review, Sidibé’s photographs “chronicle a flourishing of human hope, ambition, and newfound opportunity” while remaining timeless. This article[…..]

Remix at the Columbia Museum of Art

Fahamu Pecou. Rock.Well (Radiant Pop, Champ) (after Norman Rockwell’s Triple Self Portrait), 2010; acrylic on canvas; 48 x 48 in. Courtesy of Scott and Teddi Dolph and Columbia Museum of Art, South Carolina.

The recent curatorial trend of probing the fringes of art history for artists who have been eclipsed by the canon of white, European, male artists is a noteworthy one. While shows that feature such artists—in many cases, those who are Black—are becoming more prevalent, organizers must take care to contextualize the work without reinforcing myths that persist. The curators of Remix: Themes and Variations in[…..]

The 5th Of July at Atlanta Contemporary Art Center

Installation shot of ‘The 5th of July’ (Far Left: Katherine Bernhardt’s Cantaloupe, iPhones, Nikes and Capri Suns (2014), Acrylic and Spray Pain on Canvas, 96 x 120 inches). Image courtesy of The Atlanta Contemporary Art Center (Atlanta, GA).

The symbolic charge of “the day after” marks itself as an interval structured by ambiguity as opposed to closure—a time of wake-up calls, hangovers, regrets, and comedowns. In science fiction, the phrase often suggests the apocalyptic nightmares of a world threatened by total disaster, while in revolutionary politics it articulates the call to reality after the collective euphoria from battle has worn away. It is[…..]

Father Figures Are Hard to Find at nGbK

Rotimi Fani-Kayode. Nothing to Lose IX (Bodies of Experience), 1987; C-prints, 49 x 41 cm Courtesy of the artist, Autograph ABP, and nGbK, Berlin.

Surrounded by the works in Father Figures Are Hard to Find, fifty or so attendees sat on the concrete floor of neue Gesellschaft für bildende Kunst (nGbK), awaiting the lecture–performance Da Da Daddy Hasselhof by Mysti, who appeared in drag, wearing a cascading blonde wig and bright halter and miniskirt combo. Her academic talk began with a slow-building critique of object-making and market-driven aesthetics, and[…..]

G.T. Pellizzi: Yo Transporto at Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros

G.T. Pellizzi. Yo Transporto, 2016; wood, plywood, Ethafoam. Courtesy of Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros.

Art travels. Within the globalized art scene, its journey takes the many forms of traveling exhibitions, international art fairs, biennials, public contests, and loans from personal or institutional collections. Although this wandering condition may enrich the experience of different public spheres by bringing them closer to popular works and major exhibitions, the accelerated speed at which these movements and spectacles take place commands a huge[…..]

Question Bridge: Black Males in America

Question Bridge: Black Males in America (Aperture/Campaign for Black Male Achievement, 2015)

Today we bring you an excerpt from Art Practical’s Printed Matters column. Roula Seikaly reviews Question Bridge: Black Males in America, the published companion to a project, platform, and installation that regards identity and representation. Seikaly notes, “Asking a question […] can be difficult; it can imply lack of knowledge and experience, rendering the asker vulnerable. No one wants to be caught out, least of all when the questions address identity, community, and most urgently,[…..]