Howardena Pindell at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

The Spelman College Museum of Fine Art’s current exhibition of Howardena Pindell’s work marks an important moment in the journey of an artist and an institution. The site of Pindell’s first major exhibition in 1972, the Spelman Museum in those years was not the sprawling 4,500-square-foot institution that it is now, and Pindell had not been established as the great artist, gallery director, curator, educator,[…..]

Franz Erhard Walther and Pae White at the Henry Art Gallery

Franz Erhard Walther. Sehkanal (with body weight and exertion exposing one's opposite number to one's gaze - sight channel) Single Element n°46 of 1.Werksatz, 1968. Green fabric: 30 x 740 x 20 cm. Courtesy of Galerie Jocelyn Wolff. Photo credit: Timm Rautert. Copyright Franz Erhard Walther Foundation, Timm Rautert.

The Henry Art Gallery in Seattle opens two exhibitions, Franz Erhard Walther: The Body Draws and Pae White: Command-Shift-4. The featured artists—albeit separated by 24 years and 5,600 miles—create a compelling juxtaposition, revealing shared interests in graphic art, architecture, and fiber as mediums that shift between sculpture and performance. Both artists produce works that are liminal and in flux—forever making and remaking themselves through direct interaction.[…..]

Reformation: Public Art and the Philadelphia School Closures

Pepón Osorio. reForm, 2015; installation view, Temple University's Tyler School of Art. Photo: Constance Mensh.

Today from our friends at Pelican Bomb, we bring you Meredith Sellers’ article examining reForm, Pepón Osorio’s installation project at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. Sellers discusses reForm critically in the larger political context of Philadelphia school closures. She states, “The reForm project […] aims to create much-needed public discussion around the fate of the Philadelphia school system and to be a potential catalyst for change. But a classroom,[…..]

Tomás Saraceno: Arachnid Orchestra. Jam Sessions at NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore

Tomás Saraceno, Omega Centauri 1 Nephila Kenianensis 4 Cyrtophora citricola, 2014; Spidersilk, carbon fibre, light, Tripod. Courtesy of the artist and Esther Schipper Gallery, Berlin.

The gallery hums with screechy sounds resembling acoustic feedback, punctuated by random bursts of bass and cartoonish sound effects. The soundscape is queasily amorphous and disorienting, built on dissonance and the chaotic rhythms resonating from a handful of arachnids that have woven fine, thick webs around delicate wire frames. Featuring a plethora of spiderweb sound installations, Tomás Saraceno’s latest show Arachnid Orchestra. Jam Sessions is[…..]

Ken Price: Death Shrine I at the Harwood Museum of Art

Ken Price. Death Shrine I, 1972-76; dimensions variable. Courtesy of Ken Price Studio.

Ken Price is best known for his psychedelic ceramic sculptures: abstractions layered in paint and sanded to pristine finishes. His piece Death Shrine I (1972–1976), permanently installed at the Harwood Museum of Art in Taos, New Mexico, is an unexpected departure from this canon. The shrine is a facet of Price’s Happy’s Curios project, and is one of three such installations inspired by the iconography[…..]

From the Archives– Evan Gruzis: Shell Game at The Suburban

Evan Gruzis. Free Box, 2014; Textile dye and acrylic on canvas; 48 x 32 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Today from the archives we bring you Steve Ruiz’s review of Evan Gruzis’s Shell Game at the Suburban, Michelle Grabner and husband Brad Killam’s backyard gallery in Oak Park that pioneered the suburb’s role as a hub of Chicago alternative art spaces. Grabner’s gingham soccer ball, currently Issue 27 of THE THING Quarterly, offers up a playful rejoinder to Ken Johnson’s famous criticism of Grabner’s work as “soccer mom” art. The second[…..]

Women’s Work at Smith College Museum of Art

Guerilla Girls. The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist from Guerilla Girls, Most Wanted, 1985–2006, 1988; lithograph printed in black on paper, 17 x 22-1/8 in. Courtesy of Smith College Art Museum, purchased with the gift of the Fred Bergfors and Margaret Sandberg Foundation.

The exhibition Women’s Work is constructed within a historical frame. All of the included artists are introduced as individuals prominent in second-wave feminism, defined as a past era from the 1960s through the 1980s, a period with a beginning and an end. It cannot be denied that a great deal has changed in both feminist thought and social mores since then. Third-wave feminism called out[…..]