Reviews

Pablo Guardiola: Maintenance Yard at Romer Young Gallery

Pablo Guardiola. Sharks 1, 2014; digital C-print, 10 x 15 in. Courtesy of Romer Young Gallery, San Francisco.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical, we bring you a review of Pablo Guardiola’s Maintenance Yard at Romer Young Gallery in San Francisco. Author Genevieve Quick notes, “Guardiola positions history as an active investigatory process rather than a passive reiteration of fact.” This article was originally published on September 25, 2014. Having lived in San Francisco and currently residing in San Juan, in his native Puerto Rico,[.....]

Randal Barnett: JEF+KEV//SIM at United Solo Theatre Festival

Randal Barnett. JEF+KEV//SIM, 2014 (still); performance; TRT 40:00, Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Joelle Ballam-Schwan.

On September 21, Randal Barnett’s JEF+KEV//SIM infiltrated the ranks of this year’s United Solo Theatre Festival and inoculated its lineup of “straight” theater with the virus of queer performance art. Solo performance and performance art share a symbiotic genesis, solo performance being fundamentally based in storytelling that often features the absence of a “fourth wall” and performance art seeking to eradicate this distinction entirely, its[.....]

Issei Suda: Life in Flower 1971–1977 at Miyako Yoshinaga

Oume 1977

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Issei Suda: Life in Flower 1971–1977 at Miyako Yoshinaga in New York City. Using a medium-format camera, Issei Suda’s square-shaped black-and-white[.....]

Cynthia Ona Innis: Shift at Traywick Contemporary

Cynthia Ona Innis.
 Shift, 2014; acrylic and satin on canvas; 
45 x 50 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Traywick Contemporary, Berkeley.

Our partners at Art Practical are celebrating their sixth annual Shotgun! issue, so today we bring you Maria Porges’ review of Cynthia Ona Innis: Shift at Traywick Contemporary in Berkeley, California. This article was originally published on September 25, 2014. Rather than being representations of place, Cynthia Ona Innis’ paintings are evocations of the experience of landscape. Innis favors locations where change is visible and constant—like Iceland, where she visited a year[.....]

Here and Elsewhere at the New Museum

GCC installation, 2014. Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo by Benoit Pailley.

Here and Elsewhere, the New Museum’s colossal survey of contemporary art from the Arab world, sets for itself an impossible task. The curatorial strategy, as stated in the exhibition’s press release, is to work “against the notion of the Arab world as a homogenous or cohesive entity.” Though able to present a range of Arab identities, regionalisms, and geographies, the sprawling installation self-organizes and familiar tropes[.....]

Doug Aitken: Still Life at Regen Projects

Doug Aitken. END/RUN (timeline), 2014; Clear mirror, resin, concrete powder
coated steel; 72 x 132 3/4 x 36 in. © Doug Aitken. Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Doug Aitken is a quintessential Los Angeles artist. Working across multiple platforms—“photography, sculpture, publications, sound, and single- and multi-channel video installations”[1]—he employs the high production values and superficial slickness of Hollywood. His art is all about spectacle, whether it’s Electric Earth (1997), his multi-screen video in which a solitary protagonist dances his way through a pulsing, nocturnal urban landscape, or his recent endeavor Station to[.....]

New Image Painting at Shane Campbell Gallery

New Image Painting, 2014; installation view, Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago. Courtesy of the artist and Shane Campbell Gallery.

What sets New Image Painting at Shane Campbell Gallery apart from this year’s other sleepy season closers is not the work selected, which is a standard collection of represented artists and friends of the gallery, but rather an unusually confrontational framing within painting’s past and present history. As the curator’s statement explains, New Image Painting offers a “platform from which to critique the prevalence of[.....]