Ken Price: Death Shrine I at the Harwood Museum of Art

Ken Price. Death Shrine I, 1972-76; dimensions variable. Courtesy of Ken Price Studio.

Ken Price is best known for his psychedelic ceramic sculptures: abstractions layered in paint and sanded to pristine finishes. His piece Death Shrine I (1972–1976), permanently installed at the Harwood Museum of Art in Taos, New Mexico, is an unexpected departure from this canon. The shrine is a facet of Price’s Happy’s Curios project, and is one of three such installations inspired by the iconography[…..]

From the Archives– Evan Gruzis: Shell Game at The Suburban

Evan Gruzis. Free Box, 2014; Textile dye and acrylic on canvas; 48 x 32 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Today from the archives we bring you Steve Ruiz’s review of Evan Gruzis’s Shell Game at the Suburban, Michelle Grabner and husband Brad Killam’s backyard gallery in Oak Park that pioneered the suburb’s role as a hub of Chicago alternative art spaces. Grabner’s gingham soccer ball, currently Issue 27 of THE THING Quarterly, offers up a playful rejoinder to Ken Johnson’s famous criticism of Grabner’s work as “soccer mom” art. The second[…..]

Women’s Work at Smith College Museum of Art

Guerilla Girls. The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist from Guerilla Girls, Most Wanted, 1985–2006, 1988; lithograph printed in black on paper, 17 x 22-1/8 in. Courtesy of Smith College Art Museum, purchased with the gift of the Fred Bergfors and Margaret Sandberg Foundation.

The exhibition Women’s Work is constructed within a historical frame. All of the included artists are introduced as individuals prominent in second-wave feminism, defined as a past era from the 1960s through the 1980s, a period with a beginning and an end. It cannot be denied that a great deal has changed in both feminist thought and social mores since then. Third-wave feminism called out[…..]

UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991-2015 at the Hammer Museum

Frances Stark. Bobby Jesus’s Alma Mater b/w Reading the Book of David	and/or Paying Attention Is Free, 2013; multichannel projection with sound, inkjet 	mural, and takeaway offset posters; 7:20 min. Installation view, Carnegie International, 2013. Courtesy of Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Conley.

In a mid-career survey as large as UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991–2015, on view at the Hammer Museum, I’m usually tempted to rush over a couple of galleries and maybe even skip a video here or there. From the get-go, Stark’s exhibition, featuring 125 drawings, collages, paintings, and video installations, had me enthralled with My Best Thing (2011), a 100-minute-long episodic animation based on the artist’s[…..]

From the Archives– Paul Graham: The Present


Today from the archives, we bring you Madeline McLean’s review of Paul Graham’s 2012 exhibition The Present at Pace Gallery. The Present was the last in a trilogy of photographic series made in the United States between 1998 and 2001 that began with shimmer of possibility and American Night. All three series are included in the current survey of Graham’s work at Pier 24, titled The Whiteness of the Whale. This review was originally published on March 29,[…..]

Özlem Altin at Kiria Koula

Özlem Altin. Sleeping statue, 2013; print on litho paper; 27 ½ x 22 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Kiria Koula, San Francisco. Photo: John White.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Özlem Altin’s current solo show at Kiria Koula in San Francisco. Author Zachary Royer Scholz declares: “Özlem Altin’s exhibition at Kiria Koula is a wonderful rarity. It does not present viewers with clear answers because it is not the finished result of an exploration. It is an exploration in progress, in which viewers participate—a generous[…..]

Enrique Martínez Celaya – Empires: Land and Sea at Jack Shainman Gallery

1.	Enrique Martinez Celaya. The Bloom, for the Wilderness, 2015; oil and wax on canvas; 74-3/4 x 101-3/4 x 2-1/2 in (framed). Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

“It’s not a key,” Enrique Martínez Celaya warns of the text Empires: The Writing, which accompanies his first solo exhibition at Jack Shainman, now on view at the gallery’s two venues in Chelsea under the titles Empires: Land and Empires: Sea.[1] I meet Celaya in early September, when we walk through the shows on the eve of the artist’s departure for his home in Los Angeles. Empires[…..]