Reviews

Suzanne Opton: Soldier at Sikkema Jenkins

Suzanne Opton. Soldier: Doherty- 302 days in Afghanistan, 2004. Archival Pigment Print. 41 x 52 inches. Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins

Soldier, a series of large-scale color portraits by the photographer Suzanne Opton now on view at Sikemma Jenkins, adheres to a simple framework. It features close-ups of the faces of young soldiers who recently served in Iraq or Afghanistan, all of whom assume the same position before the camera: lying prone, one cheek resting on the ground, face turned toward the camera. While this pose[.....]

Rirkrit Tiravanija: Time Travelers Chronicle (Doubt): 2014 – 802,701 A.D at Singapore Tyler Print Institute

Rirkrit Tiravanija. Sixth chapter: take the spin off, unwind, reverse directions, and shatter the bonsai, on the way back don't forget to smile, 2013; screen print, metal foil, cast paper, STPI handmade cotton paper, stainless steel pedestal, 3D printed object; 259.5 x 259.5 cm; 4 sheets. Image courtesy of Singapore Tyler Print Institute.

“There is no difference between Time and any of the three dimensions of Space except that our consciousness moves along it.”—H.G. Wells, The Time Machine (1895) In 1992, Rirkrit Tiravanija converted the spaces of 303 Gallery in New York into a kitchen where he served rice and Thai curry to a crowd that became unwitting participants in a hybrid installation titled Untitled (Free). Seven years[.....]

Isa Genzken: Retrospective at MCA Chicago

Installation view, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, MCA Chicago. April 12-August 3, 2014. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.

Perhaps the most striking aspect of Isa Genzken: Retrospective—an expansive four-decade survey of the German artist’s work at MCA Chicago featuring sculpture, film, installation, painting, and photography—is the fact that it was all made by the same person. Over the course of her career, Genzken has successfully assimilated a wide array of styles without losing sight of a handful of core concerns: architectural structure, the[.....]

Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible at the Berkeley Art Museum

Forrest Bess. Bodies of Little Dead Children, 1949; oil on canvas; 6 x 7 5/8 in. The Menil Collection, Houston. Photo: Paul Hester.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maria Porges reviews Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible at the Berkeley Art Museum in Berkeley, California. Forrest Bess (1911–1977), a talented, visionary artist whose work was exhibited in[.....]

Valuing Labor in the Arts: Can We Talk About the Audience?

Introduction, Valuing Laboring in the Arts practicum, April 19, 2014, UC Berkeley Art Museum. Courtesy of the Arts Research Center, UC Berkeley. Photo: Joseph del Pesco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you an excerpt of author Michael O’Hare’s response after participating in the “Big Soft (BS) Contract” workshop. This workshop was part of  the practicum “Valuing Labor in the Arts” at the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley, a daylong series of artist-led workshops that explored questions of art, labor, and economics. O’Hare, who is a Professor of Public Policy at[.....]

Men in L.A.: Three Generations of Drawings at The Box

Paul McCarthy & Benjamin Weissman, Quilting Sessions, 1997-2008 (installation view)

Men in L.A.: Three Generations of Drawings at The Box features a massive collection of over 400 drawings created by artists Naotaka Hiro, Benjamin Weissman, and Paul McCarthy, individually and in collaboration with one another. The title of the exhibition overreaches somewhat—there are not really three generations, but rather three artists separated by less than thirty years in age. Yet what the exhibition does accomplish is[.....]

Sze Tsung Leong: Horizons at Yossi Milo Gallery

Sze Tsung Leong. Lake Michigan, 2012; Chromogenic Color Print; 28” x 48”. Courtesy of Yossi Milo Gallery.

Mexican-born, British-American photographer Sze Tsung Leong photographs vast, spare landscapes from around the world in his ongoing series, Horizons, on view at Yossi Milo Gallery. The arrangement of photos hops from place to place while remaining visually cohesive due to the shots’ shared composition: The horizon line bisects the image at the same point in each photograph, producing the perception of a single line unrolling along the[.....]