Reviews

Before the Rain at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Reproduced items and images from The Umbrella Movement Visual Archive, (2014), installation view (detail), 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the Umbrella Movement Visual Archive. Image: Document Photography.

Partly an archive of ephemera, mementos of a time already vanished into history, and partly an investigation of the role of the artist at historical flash points of social and political crisis, Before the Rain at Sydney’s 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is also an exploration of present-day shifts in geopolitical currents and tensions in Asia. The exhibition gathers an intergenerational group of artists[…..]

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World at the Hammer Museum

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, January 29 – May 7, 2017. Photo: Brian Forrest.

Among obsidian stones, an upturned police barricade, a beat-up refrigerator, and cow vertebrae, the detail that lingers longest in Jimmie Durham’s retrospective, on view at the Hammer Museum, is Durham’s absence. Born in Arkansas in 1940, Durham left the United States thirty years ago for Europe and has largely refrained from exhibiting in the U.S. since, giving a provocative tone to the retrospective’s title, At[…..]

A Quinquennial and Two Biennials

Forget Fear, 2012; installation view of the KW Institute for Contemporary Art’s ground floor, 7th Berlin Biennale, 2012. Courtesy of Frieze.

Today we honor the work of our friend and contributor Leigh Markopoulos, who died tragically on Friday after a car accident in Los Angeles. Leigh worked at Serpentine Gallery, Hayward Gallery, and the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts; eventually becoming the Chair of the Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice at California College of the Arts, where she shaped more than a decade of cohorts of MA students in the first[…..]

Red in View at the Whitney Museum of American Art

MPA , Entrance, 2014–2016; Pigmented inkjet print mounted on mat board and painted wood; 7 × 7 in. Courtesy of MPA and the Whitney Museum

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Jasa McKenzie assesses Red in View at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Red in View by MPA aims to explore the potential[…..]

Mickalene Thomas: Waiting on a Prime-Time Star

Mickalene Thomas, Shinique: Now I Know, 2015; Rhinestones, acrylic, and oil on wood panel. Image courtesy of the artist and Galerie Nathalie Obadia (Paris and Brussels).

The self is a slippery thing—an entity built on slippery grounds and shaped by slippery forces. The French psychotherapist Jacques Lacan perhaps put it best that “the self” is both something we build as well as imagine; it is located between the fictions of the ego and the fictions of the unconscious, where unity between the two remains impossible but deeply necessary for one’s development.[1][…..]

The Conjured Life: The Legacy of Surrealism at the Cantor Arts Center

Gertrude Abercrombie. The Courtship, 1949; oil on Masonite; 21 3/4 × 25 1/4 in. Courtesy of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

All publicity concerning The Conjured Life: The Legacy of Surrealism at Stanford University’s Cantor Art Center features The Courtship (1949) by Gertrude Abercrombie, one of six artists from the Chicago-Milwaukee-Madison parasurrealist group of the ’40s. I saw this painting once in LACMA’s all-women show of Surrealists, In Wonderland (2012), and looked forward to our reunion some five years and 361 miles hence. The inclusion of a[…..]

Takeshi Murata: 1000 Years

Takeshi Murata. Seahorse, 2017; pigment print; 29 x 40 inches. Courtesy of Ratio 3.

Computer-generated images saturate our media, from films to advertisements to video games. However, rarely do we think of these images singularly—most commonly we encounter them within the context of their media environments. In 1000 Years, Takeshi Murata’s fifth solo show at Ratio 3 gallery, the artist asks viewers to consider these images in isolation, outside of their complex digital environments. Murata uses 3D-modeling software to[…..]