Reviews

Alina Szapocznikow: Human Landscape(s) at Galerie Loevenbruck

Alina Szapocznikow. Paysage humain (du cycle «Paysages humains») [Human Landscape] (from the
Cycle «Human Landscape»), 1971;
Felt-tip pen and watercolor on cardboard; 11 13/16 x 19 3/16 in. Courtesy The Estate of Alina Szapocznikow / Piotr Stanislawski / Galerie
Loevenbruck, Paris.
© ADAGP, Paris. Photo: Fabrice Gousset.

Owing to the success of her figurative work as well as her 2012 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Polish artist Alina Szapocznikow is widely recognized for her uncanny mixed-media sculptures that incorporate cast body parts with everyday objects. Often overlooked, however, are her drawings of abstracted figures—erotic, restless, and vulnerable—though they are a central part of her practice. Human Landscape(s)[…..]

Alec Soth: Summer Nights at the Dollar Tree at Colby College Museum of Art

Alec Soth. Summer Nights at the Dollar Tree, 2012 (video still); single-channel video; 6:23. Courtesy of the Artist.

Alec Soth’s video, Summer Nights at the Dollar Tree, concludes with an excerpt from the Allen Ginsberg poem “A Supermarket in California.”    What thoughts I have of you tonight, Walt Whitman, for I walked down the sidestreets under the trees with a headache self-conscious looking at the full moon.    In my hungry fatigue, and shopping for images, I went into the neon fruit[…..]

Adam Pendleton: Becoming Imperceptible at Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans

Adam Pendleton. Installation Shot of System of Display, X (EXPRESS/Poro secret society mask, Mano, Liberia). 2016. Silkscreen ink on Plexiglas and mirror. Image courtesy of the artist and the Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans.

Curated by Dr. Andrea Andersson, Adam Pendleton: Becoming Imperceptible is the most extensive museum presentation of the artist’s work to date—a significant triumph for a cultural institution located in New Orleans, one of the most racially and politically fraught cities in the southern United States. While the exhibition’s rich display resonates with the variety of material and conceptual strategies at work in Pendleton’s oeuvre, it[…..]

Take This Hammer: Art + Media Activism from the Bay Area at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Take This Hammer: Art + Media Activism from the Bay Area, installation view, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Left: Oree Originol. Justice for Our Lives, 2014-ongoing. Right: Cat Brooks with Black Lives Matter. Anti Police-Terror Project, ‘Tasha,’ 2015. Courtesy of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. Photo: Charlie Villyard.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you editor Emily Holmes’ review of Take This Hammer at YBCA in San Francisco. Holmes notes, “Although there is crossover between works, particularly in regard to the social issues they address, violence is perhaps the single thread running through all of Take This Hammer. […] It takes many forms, but the exhibition particularly exposes systemic inequities and state-sanctioned[…..]

From the Archives – Time After Time: The Clock at SFMOMA

Christian Marclay, video still from The Clock, 2010; single-channel video with stereo sound, 24 hours; courtesy the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. All photos from Christian Marclay: The Clock; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

In June 2013, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art closed its doors to begin a massive expansion project. This weekend is the first public reopening of the museum, which now holds the status of the largest museum (by square footage) dedicated to modern art. Today we bring you a flashback to those last few hours at SFMOMA three years ago, when Christian Marclay’s The Clock[…..]

Carmen Argote: Mansión Magnolia at Shulamit Nazarian

Carmen Argote. Black Chairs, 2016; archival inkjet print; 58 x 80 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Shulamit Nazarian.

Expressions of both individual psychology and grand family histories are easily found in the architecture of a past home. These two narratives are counterintuitive yet closely related. When a family invests in a house, apartment, or some shared space, its interiors, like one’s mind, can feel simultaneously claustrophobic and inexhaustibly complex, and revisiting a former home can bring up fraught confrontations with descendants and sentimentality.[…..]

Robert Irwin: All the Rules Will Change at the Hirshhorn Museum

Robert Irwin. Bed of Roses, 1962; ©2016 Robert Irwin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Robert Irwin has had a number of distinct careers as an artist, each with a distinct group of peers and beliefs. All the Rules Will Change presents the best known but least seen of these careers: the studio painter of the 1960s, who began the decade as a conventional Abstract Expressionist, and ended it by closing his studio and abandoning a practice of painting that[…..]