Reviews

Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks at the High Museum of Art

Jean-Michel Basquiat. Untitled Notebook Page, 1980-1981. Ink on ruled notebooks paper. 9 5/8 x 7 5/8 inches. Collection of Larry Warsh. Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, all rights reserved. Licensed by Artestar, New York. Photo courtesy of Sarah DeSantis, Brooklyn Museum.

The High Museum of Art’s current exhibition, Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks, presents the viewer with a “portrait of the artist as a poet.” Although the art world has been well aware of the importance and influence of language, writing, poetry, and experimental literary tactics on Jean-Michel Basquiat’s work for some time (the artist’s notebooks are hardly “unknown”), the presentation of his notebooks as the main[…..]

Art of Prehistoric Times: Rock Paintings from the Frobenius Collection at the Martin-Gropius-Bau

Albert Hahn. Hand Silhouettes, Fish and Moon, 1937; watercolor; 26 x 37 in. Courtesy of Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin. © Frobenius-Institut Frankfurt am Main.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Robert J. Kett reviews Art of Prehistoric Times: Rock Paintings from the Frobenius Collection at the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. In a 1955 lecture on the ancient[…..]

Amir H. Fallah: All Experience Is an Arch at Hap Gallery

Students of metaphysics commonly debate about time and space as an arc—curving and perhaps boomeranging, to ends that are difficult to articulate. Los Angeles–based artist Amir H. Fallah, however, postulates the experience of time and space as something more solid and tangible, akin to a structure engineered for indiscriminate movement back and forth. All Experience Is an Arch at Hap Gallery is an experiential recounting[…..]

Cezary Poniatowski: No Center No Edges at Piktogram

Cesary Poniatowski. Untitled, 2016; acrylic on canvas, 180 x 145 cm. Image courtesy of Piktogram Gallery.

Cezary Poniatowski’s recent work at Piktogram Gallery compels viewers to navigate a veritable maze of pop-culture references and anthropological allusions. The exhibition is composed of more than twenty black-and-white acrylic paintings completed in 2015 and 2016, each depicting highly abstract, hybrid figures cavorting in confined, flat spaces reminiscent of comic-book panels. The recurrence of specific forms and motifs in the images creates the strong impression of a[…..]

Edgardo Aragón: Mesoamerica – The Hurricane Effect at Jeu de Paume

Edgardo Aragón. Mesoamerica: The Hurricane Effect, 2015 (detail of map); HD video, color, sound; 16'20'' and 10 maps. Coproduction: Jeu de Paume, Paris, Fondation des Arts Graphiques et Plastiques and CAPC Musée d'Art Contemporain de Bordeaux. Courtesy of the Artist and Jeu de Paume.

In 1527, Olas Magnus drew the Carta Marina, the first detailed account of Nordic geography and the perils plaguing it by land and sea. In the image, life seems threatened mainly by ongoing human conflict and a perpetual battle with weather, but what haunted imaginations for centuries was its depiction of the monsters inhabiting the northern seas. Their presence was a documentary mix of fact[…..]

Eric Yahnker: Noah’s Yacht at Zevitas Marcus

Eric Yahnker. Abe Lincorn, 2015; colored pencil on paper. Pierced Piety, 2015, colored pencil on paper. Shell Game, 2015 (detail); 314 Purell hand sanitizer bottles, spire seashells. Courtesy of the Artist and Zevitas Marcus.

Eric Yahnker’s large-scale colored pencil drawings are often satirical, social, and political in nature. The Los Angeles–based artist, who has worked both for South Park and as a journalist, views himself as a political cartoonist in the often patronizing and self-involved art world. Many of his previous shows have felt like incredible, offbeat, anarchic versions of the very best in political cartoons or Dadaist reinterpretations[…..]

From the Archives – Malick Sidibé

Malick Sidibé. Untitled, 1969/2004; silver gelatin print, hand-painted wooden frame. Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

This week at Daily Serving we’re remembering the life and work of photographer Malick Sidibé (1935–2016), whose studio portraiture and candid images of nightlife in Mali during the 1960s and ’70s recorded a powerful time for the recently liberated country. As author Lia Wilson comments in her 2014 review, Sidibé’s photographs “chronicle a flourishing of human hope, ambition, and newfound opportunity” while remaining timeless. This article[…..]