Reviews

Bring It Home: (Re)Locating Cultural Legacy Through the Body at San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery

Zeina Barakeh. Homeland Insecurity, 2015; single channel animated video, 6:00. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Scott Chernis.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an excerpt from Brian Karl’s review of Bring It Home: (Re)Locating Cultural Legacy Through the Body at the newly reopened San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery. The author notes, “Given the particularly intense struggles in the Bay Area today, where citizens are denied access to civil rights and basic resources by the structural discriminations of racialist and upward-funneling[…..]

Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016, at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel

Magdalena Abakanowicz. Wheel with Rope, 1973; installation view, Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947-2016. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, Los Angeles, CA.

With galleries in Zurich, London, Somerset, and New York, the Hauser & Wirth enterprise has inaugurated their newest outpost in Los Angeles, Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, with the exhibition Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016. Curated by Jenni Sorkin and Paul Schimmel, the show sprints through seventy years of art history with nearly one hundred works by thirty-four women. Sorkin and Schimmel[…..]

Radiohalo at Blain|Southern

Michael Joo. Radiohalo, 2016; installation view. Courtesy of the Artist and Blain|Southern, London. Photo: Peter Mallet.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Adam Monohon reviews Michael Joo’s Radiohalo at Blain|Southern in London. At the center of debate between creationists and the scientific community over[…..]

From Minimalism into Algorithm at the Kitchen

From Minimalism into Algorithm, Phase 2; 2016; installation view, The Kitchen. Featuring works by John McCracken, Zoe Leonard, Andrea Crespo, and Cheyney Thompson. Courtesy of The Kitchen. Photo: Jason Mandella.

In a 1966 review, Rosalind Krauss described how one of Donald Judd’s “progression” wall reliefs pulled the rug from under her. Its intervallic sequence of supporting members suggested a Renaissance colonnade, but its variable spacing negated the compositional and spatial logic that this model prepared her to expect. “The work itself exploits and at the same time confounds previous knowledge to project its own meaning,”[…..]

Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic at Seattle Art Museum

Kehinde Wiley. Mrs. Waldorf Astor, 2012; oil on linen; 72 x 60 inches. © Kehinde Wiley.

A New Republic at Seattle Art Museum is Kehinde Wiley’s second solo exhibition organized by the Brooklyn Museum. In his brief fifteen-year career, Wiley has quickly become an established cultural trope. His works have adorned the set of Empire and served as icons of the FIFA World Cup. His portraits of Black men and women are at once celebrated as a vision of Black empowerment[…..]

Prima Materia at Weinstein Gallery

Enrico Donati. Aleppo Walls, 1960; mixed media on canvas; 60 x 60 in. Courtesy of the Estate of Enrico Donati and the Weinstein Gallery, San Francisco. Photo: Nicholas Pishvanov.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Garrett Caples reviews Prima Materia at Weinstein Gallery in San Francisco. To celebrate a recent monograph written by Dawn Ades, the Weinstein Gallery has mounted an ambitious show—in[…..]

A Pan-American Alchemy: Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons at the PEM

Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons. Alchemy of the Soul, Elixir for the Spirits, 2015. Peabody Essex Museum. © 2016 Peabody Essex Museum. Photo by Peter Vanderwarker.

From our friends at Big Red & Shiny, today we bring you a review of Alchemy of the Soul: Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons. Author Leah Triplett Harrington offers a thoughtful, revelatory perspective on Campos-Pons’s work, exploring its relationship to themes of memory, exile, and labor. Triplett Harrington states, “Sugar is produced from backbreaking labor, and its ubiquitous popularity cultivated a taste for brutal control and economic dominance among the merchants[…..]