Reviews

Teiji Furuhashi: Lovers at the Museum of Modern Art

Teiji Furuhashi. Lovers, 1994; computer controlled, five-channel laser disc/sound installation with five projectors, two sound systems, two slide projectors, and slides (color, sound). Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art. © 2016 Dumb Type.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Yuting Bai reviews Teiji Furuhashi: Lovers at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Standing solemnly as an apocalyptic coda to[…..]

Francesc Ruiz: No Words, 3 Walls, 3D Porn at Florence Loewy

Francesc Ruiz. Exhibition view, No Words, 3 Walls, 3D Porn, 2016; Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Aurélien Mole.

Francesc Ruiz’s solo exhibition at the Florence Loewy gallery in Paris, No Words, 3 Walls, 3D Porn is an exercise in media archeology, with the central subject Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451. Images of Nazi book-burning campaigns combined with social anxieties concerning the increasing hegemony of media suspected of the 1950’s newest technological advancement, the television, inspired Bradbury’s 1953 novel. Bradbury presents a society in which[…..]

Jennifer and Kevin McCoy: Broker at Postmasters Gallery

Jennifer & Kevin McCoy. BROKER (still), 2016; video, 28 minutes. Courtesy of the Artists and Postmasters Gallery. Photo: Evan Schwartz

The Postmasters Gallery’s arched storefront entrance on Franklin Street in New York City’s Financial District conjures an era long gone, when artists inhabited the raw lofts of the area. High ceilings with brick and rustic Corinthian columns belie the sleek high-rise trend seeping into the city, which aptly form the setting of Jennifer and Kevin McCoy’s latest exhibition, BROKER. Well-loved for their maquettes often featuring[…..]

From the Archives – Alien She at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

L.J. Roberts. We Couldn’t Get In. We Couldn’t Get Out., 2006–07; installation view, Alien She, 2014. Courtesy of Phocasso and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco.

Alien She’s assemblage of Riot Grrrl output continues to inspire collective feminist organizing.

Atlanta Biennial at Atlanta Contemporary Art Center

Atlanta Biennial, 2016; installation view, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Georgia. Courtesy of the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center. Photo: Erin Jane Nelson.

For the first time in nine years, the South has its biennial back. With the selection of thirty-two artists in the Atlanta Biennial (ATLBNL), the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center in Georgia continues a recurring exhibition, begun in 1984 by Alan Sondheim as a response to a lack of Southern artists in that year’s Whitney Biennial. Though Sondheim’s series ended in 2007, Atlanta Contemporary has revived[…..]

Slaying Monsters: The 2016 Kuandu Biennale, Taipei

Zhang-Xu Zhan. Inferiority Bat (Hsin Hsin Joss Paper Store Series–Room 003), 2014-2015; 6-channel video animation installation; 5 min. Courtesy of the Kuandu Museum of Fine Arts.

It sounds like the start of a fairy tale. Ten curators from nine different countries are given a task to perform: Each must choose one artist with whom to create a major show. The resulting Kuandu Biennale in Taipei, Slaying Monsters, is made up of separate “solo exhibitions” from Australia, China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, and Taiwan, an interesting spin on the usual[…..]

Black Panther Party: 50th Anniversary Exhibitions

Anonymous. Untitled (Clenched Fist), circa 1965; wood; 3 x 5.5 inches. Collection of the Oakland Museum of California, Museum Purchase.

Seven exhibitions in Oakland and Berkeley commemorate the Black Panther Party’s (BPP) founding in October 1966. The celebration of one of the most successful and provocative social and political movements in American history reflects upon the Party’s profound influence. As Party member and long-time activist and educator Ericka Huggins notes, the breadth of engagement helped spread the Party’s resistance message: “The Black Panther Party always[…..]