Reviews

Jibade-Khalil Huffman: Kush Is My Cologne at Anat Ebgi

Jibade-Khalil Huffman. By The Author of Another Country and Nobody Knows My Name, 2017; transparencies in double light box; 35 x 31 x 6 1/8 in. Courtesy of Anat Ebgi. Photo: Michael Underwood.

Jibade-Khalil Huffman’s solo exhibition at Anat Ebgi, Kush Is My Cologne, lifts its title from a track on Gucci Mane’s 2009 major label debut, The State vs. Radric Davis. The allusion is one of many in Huffman’s exhibition that indicate his fixation with the popular nodes that drive contemporary cultural production, particularly, the profundity and cultural insistence of hip-hop in a world that often refuses[…..]

Tales of Our Time at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Sun Yuan and Peng Yu Can't Help Myself (2016) in Tales of Our Time at the Solomon R. Guggenheim, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Lux Yuting Bai assesses Tales of Our Time at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Launched by the Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation[…..]

Mixed Use by Jess Jones and Gaudi-Juju by Lillian Blades at Swan Coach House Gallery

Lillian Blades. Juju-Veil, 2017; mixed media. Image courtesy of the artist and Swan Coach House Gallery (Atlanta, GA).

Dual presentations of artists can often result in hasty hierarchies of “better vs. worse” or “master vs. apprentice.” However, the recent exhibition of Jess Jones’ and Lillian Blades’ work at Atlanta’s Swan Coach House Gallery tosses all that patriarchal competitive comparison out the door by presenting the strength of their individual practices, as well as their shared interest in the history and procedures of craft.[1][…..]

Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media at the Getty Center

Catherine Opie. Terry Schiavo and Pope John Paul from the series Close to Home, 2004–2005; dye diffusion prints; 15 1/2 x 14 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Journalism is experiencing a crisis of confidence as of late, with long-running mainstream sources being labeled “fake news,” while extremist propaganda mills are hailed as harbingers of the truth. Although this specific quandary may be unprecedented, the concept that the news should be viewed with a healthy skepticism—considering from where and whom it comes—is nothing new. People living under regimes that lack a free press[…..]

Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now at SFMOMA

Tsunehisa Kimura, Americanism, 1982; photomontage; 15 1/4 x 19 1/4 in. (38.74 x 48.9 cm); promised gift of a private collection to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; © Estate of Tsunehisa Kimura

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Max Blue assesses Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now at SFMOMA. When viewing any retrospective of work, patterns emerge. Visiting Japanese Photography from[…..]

From the Archives – Vesna Pavlović: LOST ART at Zeitgeist Gallery

Vesna Pavlović. Video Still, May 25, 1979, Television, Belgrade. 2015. Endura metallic print. 20.5 x 14 inches. Image courtesy of the artist and Zeitgeist Gallery (Nashville, TN).

“Instability, fragmentation, and brokenness”—these words could easily refer to the current global political situation, yet here they specify the 20th-century regime of Josep Broz Tito, a Yugoslavian revolutionary whose later presidential reign was marked by repression and human-rights violations. In street protests, as in galleries and museums, citizens around the world are turning to imaginative expressions of their fears and objections, and we are reminded of the[…..]

#EVIDENCE: Anouk Kruithof at Casemore Kirkeby

Anouk Kruithof. #EVIDENCE; 2017. Exhibition installation. Courtesy of Casemore Kirkeby.

#EVIDENCE, the current solo exhibition by Dutch-born, Mexico City–based artist Anouk Kruithof at Casemore Kirkeby Gallery, presents a sprawling series of related bodies of work inspired by Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel’s 1977 book, Evidence. Kruithof’s range of photo-based works, made mostly in 2015, do not replicate or repeat Sultan and Mandel’s project, but rather carry it forward through strategies that are carefully calculated to[…..]