Reviews

A Pan-American Alchemy: Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons at the PEM

Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons. Alchemy of the Soul, Elixir for the Spirits, 2015. Peabody Essex Museum. © 2016 Peabody Essex Museum. Photo by Peter Vanderwarker.

From our friends at Big Red & Shiny, today we bring you a review of Alchemy of the Soul: Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons. Author Leah Triplett Harrington offers a thoughtful, revelatory perspective on Campos-Pons’s work, exploring its relationship to themes of memory, exile, and labor. Triplett Harrington states, “Sugar is produced from backbreaking labor, and its ubiquitous popularity cultivated a taste for brutal control and economic dominance among the merchants[…..]

Made in Taiwan: A Retrospective of Yang Mao-Lin at the Taipei Fine Arts Museum

Yang Mao-lin. Zealandia Memorandum L9301 (1993); oil, acrylic on canvas; 112 x 194 cm. Courtesy of Taipei Fine Arts Museum.

A robust Asian democracy, Taiwan elected its first female president earlier this year. Yet thirty years ago, when the island was tentatively emerging from four decades of military rule, this future was far from certain. Made in Taiwan: A Retrospective of Yang Mao-Lin, now on view at Taipei Fine Arts Museum, spans three decades of the artist’s work. His vivid early paintings captured the growing[…..]

Who Among Us… The Art of Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle at the Museum of the African Diaspora

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle. The Sower, 2015; India ink, acrylic paint, and polyfilm on wood panel; 11 x 14 in. Courtesy of Jenkins Johnson Gallery and the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Matthew Harrison Tedford’s review of Who Among Us… The Art of Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco. The author notes, “[…] I came to see the entire exhibition as Kentifrica—not just an imaginary place, but a dream, a revision, or a projection of a continent that could have been or[…..]

Cut-Up at Franklin Street Works

Phyllis Baldino. The Unknown Series, 1994–96 (detail); mixed media. Courtesy of the Artist.

“Everything in the world began with a yes. One molecule said yes to another molecule and life was born,” professes Clarice Lispector in the first lines of her 1977 novel, The Hour of the Star. Like the universe, art also begins with a yes. Some yeses are small: get out of bed today, put this image next to that one. Other yeses are bigger: continue[…..]

LOVE IV: Cold Shower at the Schinkel Pavillon

Anthea Hamilton and Nicholas Byrne. LOVE IV: Cold Shower, 2016; installation view, the Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin. Courtesy of the Artists and the Schinkel Pavillon.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Amanda Ribas Tugwell reviews LOVE IV: Cold Shower at the Schinkel Pavillon in Berlin. The fourth iteration of Anthea Hamilton and Nicholas Byrne’s LOVE series, Cold Shower packs[…..]

Printed Matters – Daniel Coburn: The Hereditary Estate

Daniel Coburn. The Matriarch, from The Hereditary Estate, Kehrer Verlag, 2014.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Larissa Archer’s review of the photography book The Hereditary Estate by Daniel Coburn. The author writes, “It’s the eyes of Coburn’s subjects that will haunt you. The elders seem to have seen everything, leaving them with marked brows and broken hearts. The younger adults seem by turns thoughtsick and mistrustful to downright hardboiled and malicious. The children, however,[…..]

Mónica Mayer: Si Tiene Dudas… Pregunte at Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo

Mónica Mayer. Lo normal, 1978 (detail); print intervened with stamps, 10 cards. Courtesy of the artist and Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo.

Si Tiene Dudas… Pregunte [When in Doubt… Ask] at the Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo (MUAC) is a retrocollective of works by feminist art pioneer Mónica Mayer (b. Mexico City, 1954). “Retrocollective” isn’t a very well-known term[1] and certainly not one that many artists would choose to designate their career retrospective, but Mónica Mayer isn’t like other artists. Since the late ’70s, Mayer has been[…..]