Reviews

Janet Delaney: South of Market at the de Young Museum

Janet Delaney. Bulk Natural Foods, Russ at Howard Street, 1980; archival pigment print. Image courtesy of the Artist. © 2014 Janet Delaney

Today from our partners at Art Practical we bring you a review of Janet Delaney’s photographs, on view at the de Young Museum in San Francisco through July 19, 2015. Author Glen Helfand explains that the power of these images lies not just in themselves: “Delaney’s exhibition becomes a social space for the exchange of memory and the erratic flow of time in the city, and[…..]

Taryn Simon: Birds of The West Indies at Almine Rech

Taryn Simon. Detail of United Kingdom, 2014; 26 black and white images, archival inkjet prints in boxed mat and aluminum frame, 40 x 95 in. Photo by the author.

James Bond: debonair hero of the British Secret Service, or Caribbean bird expert? The answer is both. Ian Fleming named his famous spy after an ornithologist who wrote the comprehensive Birds of the West Indies. At Almine Rech Gallery in Paris, artist Taryn Simon fuses the cosmos of 007 with the interests of the researcher to produce a field guide to the birds that appear[…..]

Palermo: Works 1973–1976 at David Zwirner Gallery

Blinky Palermo. Ohne Titel (Untitled), 1973; primer, oil, fabric, and wood; 98-7/8 x 26-3/8 x 3-5/8 inches.

Palermo: Works 1973–1976, now on view at David Zwirner’s 20th St. gallery in Chelsea, speaks at close range. Unlike the gallery’s concurrent solo exhibitions—devoted to Suzan Frecon and Alice Neel—there’s no mounting symphony behind this selection of works by Blinky Palermo. The exhibition has moments of real depth, but situated between the abundance of the Frecon and Neel shows, it is in danger of functioning[…..]

Michael Pajon: Palimpsest at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery

Michael Pajon. The Night was Clear as Her Puddled Tears. 2014. Mixed media collage on book covers. 11 x 19 inches. Image: Courtesy of the Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, 2015.

To invoke a palimpsest is to find oneself wading into an extremely fertile territory of meaning. With equal relevance to the development of mathematics, geology, architecture, and memory studies, the term has transcended its origins as a reusable writing parchment in ancient Greece to become a material metaphor for the multilayered history of a particular place, epoch, or individual subject. Despite the term’s dynamic etymological[…..]

She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World at Cantor Arts Center

Gohar Dashti. Untitled #5 from the series Today’s Life and War, 2008; pigment print. Courtesy of Cantor Arts Center, Palo Alto.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World. On view though May 4 at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University, the exhibition showcases the work of twelve photographers from Iran and neighboring nations. Author John Zarobell notes that the works are “immensely poetic expressions of building a[…..]

Bill Owens: Suburbanites and Socialites at Mills College Art Museum

Bill Owens. Untitled [Baton Practice], ca. 1973. Gelatin silver print, 7 7/8 x 10 in. Gift of Marion Brenner and Robert Harshorn Shimshak. Courtesy of Mills College Art Museum, Oakland.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Maria Porges’ review of Bill Owens: Suburbanites and Socialites at Mills College Art Museum. The author notes, “When I think about the tidal wave of changes that were moving through the political and sociocultural landscape at that time, there is something both tender and awful about the reality Owens captured. It is a reality we[…..]

Rodrigo Valenzuela: Future Ruins at the Frye Art Museum

Rodrigo Valenzuela. Still from Maria TV, 2014. Digital video with audio. Courtesy of the artist.

Future Ruins, Rodrigo Valenzuela’s exhibition at the Frye Art Museum, is indeed monumental, incorporating a range of media including print, sculpture, video, and sound. The exhibition does not present a quiet, post-apocalyptic landscape that fetishizes decay; rather, Valenzuela addresses divisions of labor and the nature of work, making these complex issues manifest through the specter of the 21st-century economic landscape. And though it is discordant at[…..]