Sculpture

Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions at El Museo del Barrio

Adal Maldonado (ADAL). El Spanglish Sandwich, 2000; printed ceramic plate and stand; 8-inch diam. Courtesy of El Museo del Barrio.

Declarations of dissent can manifest in many ways. Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions, currently on view at El Museo del Barrio, surveys a range of Latin American and Caribbean artists who through their art practices have voiced their dissent from oppressive cultural forces. The curator, Nicolás Dumit Estévez, frames these artistic impulses as foundational to the history and spirit of[…..]

Loris Gréaud: The Unplayed Notes Museum at Dallas Contemporary

Loris.

From our friends at Glasstire, today we bring you Christina Rees’ review of Loris Gréaud’s current solo exhibition at Dallas Contemporary. Rees describes the choreographed destruction of the work and characterizes the show as “a partial and contrived ruin,” noting that neither the artist nor the visitors seem invested. This article was originally published on January 19, 2015.  I suppose in the event of a chemical attack[…..]

Amanda Turner Pohan: The Signals Are Caressing Us at A.I.R. Gallery

2.	Amanda Turner Pohan. The Signals Are Caressing Us, 2015; installation view, A.I.R. Gallery, Brooklyn. Courtesy of A.I.R. Gallery.

In the back room of A.I.R. Gallery in Brooklyn, a scent dispenser exhales once an hour. A meandering plastic tube connects the dispenser to a six-and-a-half-gallon jug on the floor near the center of the room. The jug contains the concentrated form of a custom-formulated perfume derived from sensors that measured the carbon dioxide exhaled by the artist Amanda Turner Pohan during thirteen unique orgasms.[…..]

Pierre Huyghe at LACMA

Pierre Huyghe. Untitled (Human Mask), 2014. Film. Courtesy of the artist; Hauser and Wirth, London; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York; Esther Schipper, Berlin; Anna Lena, Paris. © Pierre Huyghe

There is a scene in Pierre Huyghe’s shadowy, dreamlike film The Host and the Cloud (2010) in which a woman produces a black rabbit from an unmarked box. No magician, she handles the unexpected animal with a mixture of bewilderment and acute apprehension. Later in the film, she confronts the event during hypnotherapy; then, in a key conversion, she watches her own analysis session performed[…..]

Pierre Huyghe at LACMA

Pierre Huyghe. This is not a Time for Dreaming, 2004 (film still); transferred from 16mm film, 24:00; Courtesy of the Artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, Paris/New York. Photo by Michael Vahrenwald.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Scott Norton reviews Pierre Huyghe’s solo exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Entering the retrospective exhibition Pierre Huyghe at the Los Angeles[…..]

Totems Not Taboo at Newcomb Gallery

Hew Locke. Installation View of The Nameless, 2010-2014; at Newcomb Art Gallery for Prospect.3: Notes for Now, a Project of Prospect New Orleans, October 25, 2014 - January 25, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Hales Gallery, London, Photo © Scott McCrossen/ FIVE65 Design

January 6 was the official start of the Carnival season in New Orleans. Totems Not Taboo, an exhibit at Newcomb Art Gallery as part of Prospect.3: Notes for Now, is an ode to Jermayne MacAgy’s 1959 exhibit of the same name at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. MacAgy assembled one of the largest exhibitions of primitive art and displayed them as objects of fine[…..]

Art & Language: Nobody Spoke at Lisson Gallery

Art & Language. Installation shot of Drawings From the Winter. 2012-2013. Ink on paper. 41.2 x 29.7 cm each.

Retrospectives are tricky things—despite the often incomplete, reductive, and forced nature of the form, it is the curatorial genre put into action the most, and the one that most easily conforms to the logic of the museum and the market through its presentation of the individual artist’s career as linear and progressive. Audiences love them, art historians and critics love to complain about them, and[…..]