Sculpture

International Women’s Day at Night Gallery

Lizzie Fitch. Reach, 2012; Wood, ink on paper, ink on canvas, stain, screws, staples; 71.5 x 48 x 3.25 inches. Courtesy of Night Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Lee Thompson.

Night Gallery’s current five-artist exhibition, International Women’s Day, celebrates the holiday by focusing on the legacy of one woman artist in particular, Camille Claudel. Although an accomplished sculptor on her own, she was often overshadowed by her mentor and lover Auguste Rodin, and after suffering a breakdown and destroying much of her work, she spent the last thirty years of her life in an asylum. International[.....]

Sarah Lucas: Nud Nob at Gladstone Gallery

Sarah Lucas.
Chicken Knickers, 2014;
Digitally printed wallpaper.
Photo: David Regen.
Copyright Sarah Lucas.
Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

The circulation of images from Sarah Lucas’ Nud Nob, now at Gladstone Gallery, on social media and elsewhere seems bound to be both blessing and curse. On the one hand, shots of enormous concrete penises resting on crushed automobiles, or a series of floor-to-ceiling photographs of a woman consuming a banana, really propagate themselves, which makes for great publicity. But those who encounter these images are[.....]

Art(ists) on the Verge at the Soap Factory

Katie Hargrave, In Poor Tastes Good, 2014; mixed media, dimensions variable. Courtesy The Soap Factory. Photo by Lillian Egner.

Now through April, the sprawling, rough-and-tumble brick spaces of Minneapolis’ Soap Factory are filled with installation projects by five artists—the Art(ists) on the Verge, as it were. It is not quite fair to consider Art(ists) on the Verge as a single exhibition, as there is no curatorial or artistic conceit to cement the various projects into a cohesive entity. The works on view are the[.....]

Fan Mail: Wendy Given

Wendy Given. On Myth and Magic No. 5: Eclipse, 2009; C-Print; 17.25” x 26” inches. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Mythos: fantasy, fiction, legend, saga, parable, fable, narrative, invention, fabrication, yarn. The conceptual distance between myth and the concrete manifestations of mythology is a potentially endless—yet meaningfully orderable—list of synonyms. But with each word the gap shrinks, as mental images of processes and then objects emerge, even if just as puns. Wendy Given is bridging the gaps between the abstract idea of a mythos and[.....]

Michelle Segre: Symptoms of Escape Velocity at Derek Eller Gallery

Michelle Segre. Spaghetti Love, 2014; mixed media on paper; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, New York.

The constructions of Israeli-born artist Michelle Segre—towering webs of yarn, wire, and organic matter—resemble dispatches from another planet or totems of some long-lost civilization. Unfinished and roughly made, her work still evidences painstaking attention to detail, a ritualistic practice in which all the constituent elements impart shrouded, mystical meaning. A small show of her most recent work, currently on view at Derek Eller Gallery, expands[.....]

Sculpture after Sculpture at the Art Center College of Design

Name at the Sculpture after Sculpture Panel Discussion, Art Center College of Design. Photo: Chris Hatcher

Last Saturday, curator and Artforum editor-at-large Jack Bankowsky moderated a roundtable on “Sculpture after Sculpture” (more on the title in a moment) at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, in anticipation of his forthcoming three-artist survey of the same name at the Moderna Museet in Stockholm this October. The three artists, Katharina Fritsch, Jeff Koons, and Charles Ray, are united by work that[.....]

Queer Threads: Crafting Identity and Community at the Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art

Sheila Pepe. Your Granny’s not Square, 2008; Crocheted shoelaces and yarn. 72 x 144 x 48 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Queer Threads: Crafting Identity and Community, currently on view at the Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, confirms how productive a dialogue between queer theory and critical craft theory can be. The twenty-four participating artists in the exhibition interpret and complicate the rich histories of these theoretical frameworks in a variety of ways. The resulting conversation illuminates certain commonalities between the two fields,[.....]