Sculpture

Invisible Presence: Bling Memories at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center

Ebony G. Patterson. Invisible Presence: Bling Memories, 2014; installation view, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta, Georgia. Courtesy of the Artist and Atlanta Contemporary Art Center.

On May 8, 2001, the funeral of William Moore, aka Willie Haggart, was a raucous affair. Abandoning the somber mood of a typical funeral, the ceremony was a giant party at the National Arena in Kingston, Jamaica. Labeling it a “celebrity event,” Donna P. Hope writes that the style of Haggart’s funeral “ruptured the sobriety and mourning associated with traditional funeral rites.”[1] With this, the[…..]

William Koone: 10:10 at City Limits

William Koone. 10:10, 2016; installation view, City Limits, Oakland. Courtesy of the Artist and City Limits. Photo: Kristine Eudey

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Colin L. Fernandes reviews William Koone’s solo exhibition 10:10 at City Limits gallery in Oakland, California. For his exhibition at City Limits[…..]

Anthony Discenza Presents A Novel: An Exhibition by Anthony Discenza at Catharine Clark Gallery

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Maria Porges’ review of Anthony Discenza Presents A Novel: An Exhibition by Anthony Discenza at Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “Achieving a successful understanding of the many layers [of the exhibition] yields a devious satisfaction.” This article was originally published on March 22, 2016. When or why does art become the idea of art:[…..]

Bring It Home: (Re)Locating Cultural Legacy Through the Body at San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery

Zeina Barakeh. Homeland Insecurity, 2015; single channel animated video, 6:00. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Scott Chernis.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an excerpt from Brian Karl’s review of Bring It Home: (Re)Locating Cultural Legacy Through the Body at the newly reopened San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery. The author notes, “Given the particularly intense struggles in the Bay Area today, where citizens are denied access to civil rights and basic resources by the structural discriminations of racialist and upward-funneling[…..]

Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016, at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel

Magdalena Abakanowicz. Wheel with Rope, 1973; installation view, Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947-2016. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, Los Angeles, CA.

With galleries in Zurich, London, Somerset, and New York, the Hauser & Wirth enterprise has inaugurated their newest outpost in Los Angeles, Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, with the exhibition Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016. Curated by Jenni Sorkin and Paul Schimmel, the show sprints through seventy years of art history with nearly one hundred works by thirty-four women. Sorkin and Schimmel[…..]

The Lasting Concept at Portland Institute for Contemporary Art

Sara Greenberger Rafferty. Testing VIII, 2016 (detail); microphone stand and asparagus, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and (gallery). Photo: Evan La Londe/WORKSIGHTED

The Lasting Concept at Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA) is, by design, chronically unsure of its form. Initially conceptualized as a publication of the same name, the exhibition explores the nagging, process-driven revelation of being unable to excise a particular understanding from one’s thinking. With content that requires a method of digestion similar to reading, the exhibition’s connection to experimental publishing is evident. It’s[…..]

From Minimalism into Algorithm at the Kitchen

From Minimalism into Algorithm, Phase 2; 2016; installation view, The Kitchen. Featuring works by John McCracken, Zoe Leonard, Andrea Crespo, and Cheyney Thompson. Courtesy of The Kitchen. Photo: Jason Mandella.

In a 1966 review, Rosalind Krauss described how one of Donald Judd’s “progression” wall reliefs pulled the rug from under her. Its intervallic sequence of supporting members suggested a Renaissance colonnade, but its variable spacing negated the compositional and spatial logic that this model prepared her to expect. “The work itself exploits and at the same time confounds previous knowledge to project its own meaning,”[…..]