Sculpture

Misako Inaoka: Fractured Fauna at Johansson Projects

Misako Inaoka. Bird Man, 2014; mixed media; 19 x 20 x 10 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Johansson Projects, Oakland.

Our partners at Art Practical are celebrating their sixth annual Shotgun! issue, so today we bring you Monica Westin’s review of Misako Inaoka: Fractured Fauna at Johansson Projects. This article was originally published on September 25, 2014. Misako Inaoka’s menagerie of upholstered animal sculptures, exquisite quasi-taxidermy, and delicate collage works is immediately alluring. It only becomes clear after spending time with the objects that their beguiling quality critiques our own desires for[…..]

Mungo Thomson: Wall, Window, or Bar Signs at Kadist Art Foundation

Mungo Thomson. My Name as Written by Bruce Nauman, 2014; neon, 60 x 120 in. Courtesy of the Artist and the Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco. Photo by Jeff Warrin.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Melissa Miller reviews Mungo Thomson’s Wall, Window, or Bar Signs at Kadist Art Foundation in San Francisco. In Mungo Thomson’s solo exhibition[…..]

AnnieLaurie Erickson: Data Shadows at Carroll Gallery

AnnieLaurie Erickson. Local Server Series, 2014; installation view, Data Shadows, 2014. Courtesy of AnnieLaurie Erickson and Tulane University. Photo: AnnieLaurie Erickson

Photographer AnnieLaurie Erickson has spent a lot of time lately being watched by law enforcement. In her recent trip this year to Oklahoma, she stood on public property, taking photographs while security guards, local officers, and state police looked on. One might ask, what has she been photographing that requires so much surveillance? The answer is: big data centers throughout the Southern United States, the[…..]

Doug Aitken: Still Life at Regen Projects

Doug Aitken. END/RUN (timeline), 2014; Clear mirror, resin, concrete powder
coated steel; 72 x 132 3/4 x 36 in. © Doug Aitken. Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles.

Doug Aitken is a quintessential Los Angeles artist. Working across multiple platforms—“photography, sculpture, publications, sound, and single- and multi-channel video installations”[1]—he employs the high production values and superficial slickness of Hollywood. His art is all about spectacle, whether it’s Electric Earth (1997), his multi-screen video in which a solitary protagonist dances his way through a pulsing, nocturnal urban landscape, or his recent endeavor Station to[…..]

Fan Mail: Lisa Wicka

Lisa Wicka. Construction of Self (detail), 2013; House paint, vintage wallpaper, laminate flooring, wood and chalk line; two interior spaces: 5 x 7 x 15 feet and 4 x 5 x 6 feet. Courtesy of the artist.

At the heart of Lisa Wicka’s artwork is a set of keenly nuanced spatial and visual adaptations. Her work transforms motifs, compositions, and ideas—human figures, abstract shapes, and reinterpretations of physical and perceived spaces—into unified bodies. Her small canvases, combine-like sculptures, and large-scale installations all mark their spaces of display with striking gravity. Most arresting is Wicka’s ability to create compositions that profoundly alter visual[…..]

Nick Cave: Made by Whites for Whites, at Jack Shainman Gallery

In Made by Whites for Whites, Nick Cave’s new show at Jack Shainman Gallery, the artist continues to exhibit works characteristic of his making process, in which the reclamation of found objects functions as a catalyst. “It’s always the object that provides me the impulse,” he said in a recent talk at the gallery. “It’s always one thing that sort of sets it up. It[…..]

Erick Beltrán, interviewed by Rodrigo Ortiz Monasterio

erick_beltran_01

Today we bring you a video of artist Erick Beltrán at the Museo Tamayo in Mexico City, discussing his work Atlas Eidolon, a sculpture that addresses the question of memory, or “what lives in our heads and how things appear in the world.” This video was produced by our friends at Kadist Art Foundation.