Sculpture

Celebrating a Vision: Art and Disability at SFO

Susan Wise. Baskets, 2015; mixed media; variable dimensions. Courtesy of the Artist and NIAD Art Center, Oakland.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Ángel Rafael Vázquez-Concepción reviews Celebrating a Vision: Art and Disability at the San Francisco International Airport Terminal Three Gallery. Traveling via San Francisco International Airport (SFO)[…..]

Art Dives Underground in Downtown D.C.

bmoreart_balls

Today from our friends at BmoreArt we bring you a piece on an interactive art installation in an abandoned trolley station. Author Brendan L. Smith says of the space, “The curving walls of an oval-shaped room descend like stair steps next to a cluster of miniature buildings that resemble a child’s bristle-block creations.” This article was originally published on April 4, 2016. In an abandoned[…..]

Paola Pivi: Ma’am at Dallas Contemporary Museum

Paola Pivi. Installation view of Ma'am, 2016. Photo by Kevin Todora. Image courtesy Dallas Contemporary.

Paola Pivi’s exhibition, Ma’am, at the Dallas Contemporary Museum fills the galleries with colorful creatures and inflatables, coffee beans, feathers, and faux pearls. Visual tricks and gags, sensorial puns, and oddities—these are the territory of Pivi’s sculptures, photographs, films, and interventions. Her monumentally scaled, untitled airplane work—a small Fiat G-91 placed upside-down on the floor—guards the entrance into the space. Around the corner, a swath of[…..]

Alina Szapocznikow: Human Landscape(s) at Galerie Loevenbruck

Alina Szapocznikow. Paysage humain (du cycle «Paysages humains») [Human Landscape] (from the
Cycle «Human Landscape»), 1971;
Felt-tip pen and watercolor on cardboard; 11 13/16 x 19 3/16 in. Courtesy The Estate of Alina Szapocznikow / Piotr Stanislawski / Galerie
Loevenbruck, Paris.
© ADAGP, Paris. Photo: Fabrice Gousset.

Owing to the success of her figurative work as well as her 2012 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Polish artist Alina Szapocznikow is widely recognized for her uncanny mixed-media sculptures that incorporate cast body parts with everyday objects. Often overlooked, however, are her drawings of abstracted figures—erotic, restless, and vulnerable—though they are a central part of her practice. Human Landscape(s)[…..]

Flavr Savr* at the Pit

Lynn Hershman Leeson. GMO Animals, Crops, Labs (The Infinity Engine), 2014; wallpaper; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and the Pit.

The Pit, a small artist-run gallery, sits semi-hidden in a commercial and industrial neighborhood north of Los Angeles. Artists Devon Oder and Adam Miller founded the gallery in 2014, exhibiting emerging artists in tightly curated group shows alongside at least one well-established artist. The Pit, located in a converted car mechanic’s garage, has the same anonymously beige exterior as the neighboring businesses. But its out-of-the-way[…..]

Fan Mail: Alexander Heffesse

Alexander Heffesse. Sanitary Wipe (Large), 2016; solid surface, epoxy, paper towel, nylon strap, stand; 12 x 5 x 11 in. Photo by Adele Schelling.

With a background in architecture, it’s no surprise that Brooklyn-based artist Alexander Heffesse works so well with space. Heffesse engages with installation as a construction site, his point of departure being the idea of the construction worker as an artisan figure engaged in the act of creating. Noticing the proliferation of empty Gatorade bottles at construction sites, Heffesse drew a connection between social economics and[…..]

Robert Irwin: All the Rules Will Change at the Hirshhorn Museum

Robert Irwin. Bed of Roses, 1962; ©2016 Robert Irwin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Robert Irwin has had a number of distinct careers as an artist, each with a distinct group of peers and beliefs. All the Rules Will Change presents the best known but least seen of these careers: the studio painter of the 1960s, who began the decade as a conventional Abstract Expressionist, and ended it by closing his studio and abandoning a practice of painting that[…..]