Sculpture

G.T. Pellizzi: Yo Transporto at Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros

G.T. Pellizzi. Yo Transporto, 2016; wood, plywood, Ethafoam. Courtesy of Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros.

Art travels. Within the globalized art scene, its journey takes the many forms of traveling exhibitions, international art fairs, biennials, public contests, and loans from personal or institutional collections. Although this wandering condition may enrich the experience of different public spheres by bringing them closer to popular works and major exhibitions, the accelerated speed at which these movements and spectacles take place commands a huge[…..]

Alice Könitz: Commonwealth at Commonwealth & Council

Alice Könitz. Kiosk, 2016; wood, wood stain, PVC pipe; 76½ x 96 x 96 in. Courtesy of the artist and Commonwealth & Council.

Just as a bar’s allure resides not in its efficient exchange of money for alcohol, but in its ability to be a pleasant setting for individuals to be together, a gallery’s strength resides in its ability to become a social space, where the art becomes a campfire around which people can mingle, chat, and maybe even have fun. Yet, from the ugly sterility of the[…..]

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art

Marcel Broodthaers. Pense-Bete (Memory Aid), 1964; books, paper, plaster and plastic balls on wooden base, without wooden base; 11 13/16 × 33 1/4 × 16 15/16 in. Courtesy of the Collection Flemish Community, long-term loan S.M.A.K. © 2016 Estate of Marcel Broodthaers, the Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, SABAM, Brussels, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Andreas Petrossiants reviews Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In Marcel Broodthaers’ poem “Question de[…..]

Invisible Presence: Bling Memories at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center

Ebony G. Patterson. Invisible Presence: Bling Memories, 2014; installation view, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta, Georgia. Courtesy of the Artist and Atlanta Contemporary Art Center.

On May 8, 2001, the funeral of William Moore, aka Willie Haggart, was a raucous affair. Abandoning the somber mood of a typical funeral, the ceremony was a giant party at the National Arena in Kingston, Jamaica. Labeling it a “celebrity event,” Donna P. Hope writes that the style of Haggart’s funeral “ruptured the sobriety and mourning associated with traditional funeral rites.”[1] With this, the[…..]

William Koone: 10:10 at City Limits

William Koone. 10:10, 2016; installation view, City Limits, Oakland. Courtesy of the Artist and City Limits. Photo: Kristine Eudey

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Colin L. Fernandes reviews William Koone’s solo exhibition 10:10 at City Limits gallery in Oakland, California. For his exhibition at City Limits[…..]

Anthony Discenza Presents A Novel: An Exhibition by Anthony Discenza at Catharine Clark Gallery

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Maria Porges’ review of Anthony Discenza Presents A Novel: An Exhibition by Anthony Discenza at Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “Achieving a successful understanding of the many layers [of the exhibition] yields a devious satisfaction.” This article was originally published on March 22, 2016. When or why does art become the idea of art:[…..]

Bring It Home: (Re)Locating Cultural Legacy Through the Body at San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery

Zeina Barakeh. Homeland Insecurity, 2015; single channel animated video, 6:00. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Scott Chernis.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an excerpt from Brian Karl’s review of Bring It Home: (Re)Locating Cultural Legacy Through the Body at the newly reopened San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery. The author notes, “Given the particularly intense struggles in the Bay Area today, where citizens are denied access to civil rights and basic resources by the structural discriminations of racialist and upward-funneling[…..]