Luka Fineisen: Smoke and Mirrors at Hosfelt Gallery

Luka Fineisen. Possibility, 2015; glitter, resin, Plexiglas shelf; 47 x 73 x 6 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Serena Pascual reviews Luka Fineisen: Smoke and Mirrors at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Luka Fineisen’s solo show Smoke and Mirrors entertains with a multitude of[…..]

After Utopia at the Singapore Art Museum

Shen Shaomin. Summit (detail) silica gel simulation, acrylic and fabric, dimensions variable, Singapore Art Museum collection, image courtesy Singapore Art Museum

After Utopia: Revisiting the Ideal in Asian Contemporary Art at the Singapore Art Museum (SAM) explores the dissonance between our innermost longings and the contemporary world we have created. Gunter Grass said, rather gloomily, that melancholy and utopia are heads and tails of the same coin. Imagining perfection, we confront the contradiction between the Arcadia of our imagination and the imperfect realities of our everyday. Featuring eighteen[…..]

HA HA! BUSINESS! at Luis De Jesus

Joseph Scalan. Meme 2002/2015; C-print, acqueous inkjet prints, pva; 40 x 30 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Luis De Jesus. Photo: Calder Yates

Novelist Don DeLillo once quipped, “California deserves whatever it gets. Californians invented the concept of lifestyle. This alone warrants their doom.” This concept is the curatorial mission behind HA HA! BUSINESS!, currently on view at Luis de Jesus, Los Angeles. HA HA! BUSINESS! reprimands what it sees as a jingoistic and self-centered lifestyle—a world filled with social-media fiends who are willing to cut down the[…..]

Ten Years Gone at the New Orleans Museum of Art

Willie Birch. Crawfish Dwelling. 2009. Bronze. 6 x 5.5 x 4 inches. Image courtesy of Willie Birch and the Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans, LA.

In the aftermath of a catastrophe, memorialization and remembrance are inevitably tied to forms of forgetting. These often take the shape of reactionary modes that proclaim an urgent desire to smooth over the eruptive, unresolved conflicts that shape our collective past and place them into digestible modes of representation.[1] However, for the communities that bear witness to the impact of a disastrous event, forgetting is[…..]

CONSTRUCT\S at the Wing Luke Museum

Lynne Yamamoto. Whither House, 2015; installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Wing Luke Museum. Photo: Toryan Dixon.

CONSTRUCT\S: Installations by Asian Pacific American Women Artists at the Wing Luke Museum is a journey into the lives and minds of six artists who employ a range of media and creative tactics to explore sociocultural identity, familial history, and locality. The exhibition does not claim to be a comprehensive survey of “Asian Pacific American art.” Rather, it provides an array of entry points into[…..]

Environmental Impact at the Hilliard University Art Museum

Edward Burtynsky. Oxford Tire Pile #2, Westley, California. 1999. Chromogenic color print. 40 x 50 inches. Image courtesy of Tom Thomsen Art Gallery, Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada.

The majesty of our planet—its sublime beauty, biological diversity, and ability to instigate powerful modes of metaphysical reflection within its human inhabitants—remains a constant motif in the history of Western art. The paintings of Claude Lorrain, Rembrandt, Caspar David Friedrich, and George Inness are enduring reminders of the aesthetic richness of the genre. The sensual pleasures that the natural world incites and the darker forces[…..]

Jason Kalogiros: The Measure, The Weight, The Ground, The Scale at CAPITAL

Jason Kalogiros. Untitled (Drawing), 2015; unique gelatin silver photograph; 24 x 20 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Capital, San Francisco.

 Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Jason Kalogiros’ current solo show at Capital in San Francisco. Author Danica Willard Sachs notes, “[T]he artist employs the methodology of photography to interrogate the discrete boundaries between media.” This article was originally published on July 2, 2015. The process of making a photograph bears striking resemblance to the process of making a bronze sculpture.[…..]