Sculpture

COMMUNE at White Rabbit Gallery of Contemporary Chinese Art

Xia XIng, '2010', 2010 - 2011, oil on canvas, 35 x 50cm (x60) image courtesy White Rabbit Gallery

The word commune, whether used as a noun or a verb, has complex connotations. From earnest Utopianism to grim, state-enforced collectivism; from familial relationships and networks to our connection with the natural world—all of these possible associations are present in the new show at Sydney’s White Rabbit Gallery of Contemporary Chinese Art. From Judith Neilson’s impressive collection, curator Bonnie Hudson has selected works by twenty-three artists.[…..]

Fan Mail: Joe Penrod

Joe Penrod. Deflated (after 3 weeks), 2010; mylar balloons, painter’s tape; 4 x 3 feet. Courtesy of Half/Dozen Gallery.

Typically, the studio is where artists make their work, but Joe Penrod’s space for creative development exists anywhere a shadow falls. Armed with only a roll of cerulean painter’s tape, Penrod transforms once-mundane shadows (and the objects that cast them) into fecund sculptural compositions. There are a few stages in Penrod’s process. First he finds an object that casts a particularly beautiful or striking shadow.[…..]

Neal Rock: Herm 0714 at Loudhailer Gallery

Neal Rock. Schwarze Prosopon, 2014; Silicone paint, styrofoam & MDF, 25 x 13 x 8 in. Photo courtesy Loudhailer Gallery and the artist.

The latest exhibition of work by Los Angeles-based artist Neal Rock, currently on view at Culver City’s Loudhailer Gallery, asks viewers to consider artistic materials in a fresh and interesting way, but falls somewhat short conceptually. Rock’s abstract, sculptural works combine found components, such as insulation material, with layered experiments in oil paint, silicone, and printing. These idiosyncratic objects are tantalizingly ambiguous in tone but[…..]

Summer Reading: Phyllida Barlow & Vincent Fecteau

Vincent Fecteau. Untitled, 2008; Papier-mâché, acrylic paint; 25 3/4 x 32 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches. Copyright Vincent Fecteau. Image courtesy of the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery.

As the editors at Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts of our[…..]

Recurrence at Fridman Gallery

Lauren_Fensterstock_FRIDMANGALLERY

Recurrence, a five-artist exhibition curated by Luisa Aguilar Solis and Georgia Horn now at Fridman Gallery, takes its name from Italo Calvino’s 1968 novel, Daughters of the Moon. Calvino imagines a world in which capitalist society’s obsession with consumption and novelty, and the cycle of obsolescence that inevitably follows, reaches a fever pitch: People decide that the moon, cratered as it is, is past its[…..]

Pia Camil: The Little Dog Laughed at Blum & Poe

Pia Camil, The Little Dog Laughed, Installation view, 2014, Blum & Poe, Los Angeles; l. Asfalto, 2014, Hand dyed and stitched canvas, 94 1/2 x 94 1/2 inches.
r. The little dog laughed, 2014, Hand dyed and stitched canvas, 108 1/4 x 330 11/16 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles

Pia Camil’s hand-dyed and stitched canvases offer a fresh approach to the well-worn field of geometric abstraction. For her first solo show in Los Angeles, this Mexico City-based artist has created four large, square wall works whose surfaces are divided into loose grids of colored stripes. Each work has a dominant color theme—cream, tan, blue, and purple—with brighter accents of yellow, red, and peach. Within[…..]

The Part in the Story Where a Part Becomes a Part of Something Else at Witte de With

Ahmet Ögüt and Cevdet Erek. Ahmet Cevdet Bey: “Jacket”, 2011.

The Part in the Story Where a Part Becomes a Part of Something Else is an exhibition that covers a lot of ground. The Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art brings together over fifty artists with multifaceted disciplines, but despite the large scale, the show can be distilled to a few threads that highlight the potential for art to create constructed moments. This underlying[…..]