Sculpture

British British Polish Polish at the Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle

Konrad Smolenski. Rysunek (Drawing), 2001; color video, sound, 3 min 30 sec.

Now on view at the Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle in Warsaw, British British Polish Polish is a comprehensive—nearly overwhelming—exhibition with works by more than 60 artists occupying two floors. Though the individual pieces of the show are often thrilling, their overall placement leaves much to be desired. According to curators Marek Goździewski and Tom Morton, the exhibition is meant to reflect “the extraordinary[.....]

Fan Mail: Senan Lee & Pansy Aung, a.k.a. Salt ’n’ Pepper Squid

Senan Lee & Pansy Aung. The Diving Bell, 2013; Recycled cardboard; 80 x 80 x 80 cm. Courtesy the artists.

Senan Lee and Pansy Aung make up the duo Salt’n’Pepper Squid, and they specialize in making innovative and often humorous advertising campaigns that range from magazine spreads to promotional videos. Their recent evolution from individual creative producers to collaborators—in June of this year—has inspired new ways of thinking that reach beyond the campaigns the duo are accustomed to making. In September, they came up with[.....]

If the World Changed: Singapore Biennale 2013

Teamlab. Peace Can Be Realized Even Without Order, 2012; interactive digital installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Singapore Art Museum.

Premised on the obliquely hypothetical question “What if the world changed?”, the Singapore Biennale 2013 (SB2013) is presented as a deconstructed entity centered on allusive keywords—or “tags” in internetspeak—such as “histories,” “intervention,” and “materiality” in order to highlight the transmutative and the transformative qualities of the art produced in the region. With a collaborative team of 27 curators instead of an artistic director helming the show,[.....]

Andrew Nicholls: The Water Works at Turner Galleries

Australian artist Andrew Nicholls dredges the queasy aesthetics of sentiment for its submerged ideological content. In an ongoing thread of his practice, he locates the ideals and practices of British imperialism in the kitsch, seemingly innocuous world of 19th- and 20th-century ceramics, disrupting this historical narrative with traces of the otherness otherwise repressed in the imperial worldview. He subsumes his viewers in an unsteady undertow[.....]

Katharina Fritsch’s Uncanny Sculptures

Katharina Fritsch. Company at Table, 1988; polyester, wood, cotton, paint; 140 x 1600 x 175 cm.

From our friends at Beautiful/Decay, today we bring you a look at the work of artist Katharina Fritsch, whose giant blue rooster Hahn/Cock (2013) was unveiled on the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square, London, earlier this year. Though Fritsch’s work is often quite funny, author Pauli Ochi notes: “Fritsch’s sculpture is also deeply unnerving.” This article was originally published on October 25, 2013. Katharina Fritsch is a German-born artist who transforms[.....]

Wynne Greenwood: More Heads at Soloway

Wynne Greenwood. Pink Head, 2013; ceramic and acrylic paint; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Soloway.

In the mid-2000s, Wynne Greenwood‘s video persona sparked an adolescent idolatry in me that really started everything. In Tracey + The Plastics, Greenwood’s three-person electro-pop band, she played all the characters, performing live shows in conversation with pre-recorded projections of herself. Watching Greenwood essentially talk to herself through Tracy, Nikki, and Cola, I was delivered a vision of the millennial queer future in which we[.....]

Barbad Golshiri: Curriculum Mortis at Thomas Erben Gallery

Barbad Golshiri. The Untitled Tomb, 2012; iron, soot, 53 x 24 in. Edition of 3. Photo: Andreas Vesterlund, courtesy the artist and Thomas Erben Gallery, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Barbad Golshiri’s Curriculum Mortis at Thomas Erben Gallery in New York City. The question of martyrdom pervades Barbad Golshiri’s sculptural installation of tombstones in[.....]