Sculpture

Rodrigo Valenzuela: Future Ruins at the Frye Art Museum

Rodrigo Valenzuela. Still from Maria TV, 2014. Digital video with audio. Courtesy of the artist.

Future Ruins, Rodrigo Valenzuela’s exhibition at the Frye Art Museum, is indeed monumental, incorporating a range of media including print, sculpture, video, and sound. The exhibition does not present a quiet, post-apocalyptic landscape that fetishizes decay; rather, Valenzuela addresses divisions of labor and the nature of work, making these complex issues manifest through the specter of the 21st-century economic landscape. And though it is discordant at[…..]

Daniel Dallabrida: Building the Noble Ruin at the Anderson Art Ranch

Daniel Dallabrida. Upon Reflection (Life) Fraternitas Misericordia in pace prima del diluvio / At Peace Before the Deluge, 1964–2015; Edition of 15. 100 x 132 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Anderson Art Ranch.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Kristin Carlson reviews Building the Noble Ruin at the Patton-Malott and Gideon Gartner Galleries of Anderson Art Ranch in Snowmass Village, Colorado.  Excavated from iconic gay culture[…..]

Nikita Kadan: Limits of Responsibility at Waterside Contemporary

Nikita Kadan. Protection of Plants, 2014; collage; 39.5 x 54.5 cm (15.5 x 21.46 in). Courtesy of the Artist and Waterside Contemporary, London. NFC.

Hope is a powerful catalyst for change, fueling courage and idealism in equal parts. It projects a vision of a future that is better than the present. Once people are moved with hope, extraordinary things can happen. But what happens to hope when a people are continuously subjugated for over six centuries? If Kiev-based artist Nikita Kadan’s quietly intense installation at Waterside Contemporary is an[…..]

Fan Mail: Willie Stewart

Willie Stewart. The Love You Withhold is the Pain that You Carry, 2014. Installation view kijidome, Boston, MA. Courtesy of kijidome and the Artist.

Willie Stewart incorporates a broad range of complex, mundane, strange, and dark subject matter and cultural references into his work. His interests and references include extraterrestrials, biker gangs and punk rock groups, German artist Kurt Schwitters’s Merzbau (1931–33), Mike Kelley’s book The Uncanny, and cult films such as Lloyd Kaufman’s Toxic Avenger (1984). Stewart’s sculptures, installations, videos, photographs, and photocollages are all individual works, but each[…..]

Room Full of Mirrors: The Dazzling Life And Legacy Of Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian

Monir. Lightning for Neda, 2009; Courtesy the Artist and The Third Line

Today from our friends at REORIENT, we bring you an excerpt from Nicola Baird‘s feature on the life and work of artist Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian. Baird explains, “Monir’s works present a world wherein everything is moving to transformative effect.” This article was originally published on January 5, 2015; an exhibition of Monir’s works will open in New York at the Guggenheim on March 13, 2015. The artist[…..]

From the Archives – Sarah Lucas: SITUATION Absolute Beach Man Rubble at Whitechapel Gallery

Sarah Lucas. Installation view, 2013 Courtesy Whitechapel Gallery, London, Photo: Stephen White

Here at Daily Serving, we’re excited that Sarah Lucas will represent the UK at the 2015 Venice Biennale. Gregor Muir, a member of the selection panel, was quoted in a recent article, saying, “Having consistently pushed the limits of her practice, there’s a sense that Lucas—seemingly more active than ever—is coming into her own.” We couldn’t agree more, and so today from our archives we’re sharing[…..]

Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions at El Museo del Barrio

Adal Maldonado (ADAL). El Spanglish Sandwich, 2000; printed ceramic plate and stand; 8-inch diam. Courtesy of El Museo del Barrio.

Declarations of dissent can manifest in many ways. Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions, currently on view at El Museo del Barrio, surveys a range of Latin American and Caribbean artists who through their art practices have voiced their dissent from oppressive cultural forces. The curator, Nicolás Dumit Estévez, frames these artistic impulses as foundational to the history and spirit of[…..]