Sculpture

Made in Taiwan: A Retrospective of Yang Mao-Lin at the Taipei Fine Arts Museum

Yang Mao-lin. Zealandia Memorandum L9301 (1993); oil, acrylic on canvas; 112 x 194 cm. Courtesy of Taipei Fine Arts Museum.

A robust Asian democracy, Taiwan elected its first female president earlier this year. Yet thirty years ago, when the island was tentatively emerging from four decades of military rule, this future was far from certain. Made in Taiwan: A Retrospective of Yang Mao-Lin, now on view at Taipei Fine Arts Museum, spans three decades of the artist’s work. His vivid early paintings captured the growing[…..]

Who Among Us… The Art of Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle at the Museum of the African Diaspora

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle. The Sower, 2015; India ink, acrylic paint, and polyfilm on wood panel; 11 x 14 in. Courtesy of Jenkins Johnson Gallery and the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Matthew Harrison Tedford’s review of Who Among Us… The Art of Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco. The author notes, “[…] I came to see the entire exhibition as Kentifrica—not just an imaginary place, but a dream, a revision, or a projection of a continent that could have been or[…..]

Cut-Up at Franklin Street Works

Phyllis Baldino. The Unknown Series, 1994–96 (detail); mixed media. Courtesy of the Artist.

“Everything in the world began with a yes. One molecule said yes to another molecule and life was born,” professes Clarice Lispector in the first lines of her 1977 novel, The Hour of the Star. Like the universe, art also begins with a yes. Some yeses are small: get out of bed today, put this image next to that one. Other yeses are bigger: continue[…..]

Andrew Birk: Callejero at Anonymous Gallery

Andrew Birk. Callejero, 2016; installation view, Anonymous Gallery, Mexico City. Courtesy the artist and Anonymous Gallery, Mexico City.

Andrew Birk is a gringo. I don’t mention this as an insult—I’m one too, after all—but to give some context to his work. The Portland, Oregon, native has lived in Mexico City since 2011 and has a clear affinity for the cacophony and vibrancy of this dense, sprawling metropolis. It is with the fresh eyes of an outsider that Birk is able to translate the[…..]

The Carnival, The City, and The Sea at Louisiana State University Museum Of Art

Volvick Almonor. Le Bal. 1976. Oil on panel. Image courtesy of the New Orleans Museum of Art and the LSU Museum of Art.

Curated by Xavier University professor Dr. Sarah Clunis, The Carnival, The City, And The Sea seeks to introduce the university’s community to the rich history of 20th-century Haitian painting as it evolved within the Centre d’Art of Cap-Haitien in the 1940s and ’50s, and to the eclectic constellation of styles and aesthetic intentions that continue to shape cultural production in the region.[1] Comprising works on[…..]

Mike Bray: Light Grammar/Grammar Light at Fourteen30 Contemporary

Mike Bray. ​The Necessity to Interfere with Movement​, 2016; light stands, ​acrylic, neon;​ 60​ x ​78​ x ​6​ inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Fourteen30 Contemporary.

The mechanics of grammar are the starter set of must-know rules for uniform speaking. They are the basic regulations without which language can be rendered clumsy beyond comprehension. Artist Mike Bray engages with these mechanics through his video, photographic, and sculptural works. At first concerned with the logistics of light and form on a fundamental level, Bray’s works expand to make visible their potential through[…..]

Noam Rappaport: Dogleg at Ratio 3

Noam Rappaport. Dogleg, 2015; oil, acrylic, high-density foam, paper, canvas; 90 x 55 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Ratio 3, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Justin Mata reviews Noam Rappaport: Dogleg at Ratio 3 in San Francisco. Noam Rappaport’s artwork exists in a continuum of modernist object-making, a growing history of formal exploration.[…..]