Social Practice

The Art of Citizenship: Mierle Laderman Ukeles at the Queens Museum

Mierle Laderman Ukeles. Sanitation Celebrations: Grand Finale of the First NYC Art Parade, Part I: The Social Mirror, 1983; garbage collection truck, tempered glass mirror, and acrylic mirror; 28 x 8 x 10 1⁄2 ft. Created in collaboration with DSNY. Courtesy of the Artist.
Mierle Laderman Ukeles. Sanitation Celebrations: Grand Finale of the First NYC Art Parade, Part I: The Social Mirror, 1983; garbage collection truck, tempered glass mirror, and acrylic mirror; 28 x 8 x 10 1⁄2 ft. Created in collaboration with DSNY. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you Aruna D’Souza’s reflections on Mierle Laderman Ukeles at the Queens Museum. This article was published as part of Art Practical’s issue 8.1: Art + Citizenship. D’Souza states  “[Ukeles] work, and the role of the artist that her work inscribed, makes a powerful argument for the artistic possibilities of citizenship—and the responsibilities, obligations, and collective pleasures[…..]

From the Archives – Alien She at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

L.J. Roberts. We Couldn’t Get In. We Couldn’t Get Out., 2006–07; installation view, Alien She, 2014. Courtesy of Phocasso and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco.

Alien She’s assemblage of Riot Grrrl output continues to inspire collective feminist organizing.

The Guerrilla Girls and La Barbe at mfc-michèle didier

La Barbe. Au patriarcat, les hommes reconnaissants [To the patriarchy, the grateful men]; digital print; 8.3 x 11.7 in. Courtesy of La Barbe. Photo: Charles Duprat.

After thirty years of the Guerrilla Girls presenting statistics that repeatedly show the underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women in public collections, museums, and galleries around the world, one would think that these institutions would have been driven to promote changes en masse, if only out of shame. Yet, as the New York–based feminist group keeps evidencing, the archaic status quo in the art world has proven[…..]

From the Archives – The Rape of the Sabine Women: Eve Sussman and Rufus Corporation at Impronte Art

Eve Sussman | Rufus Corporation, Annette with Rabbits, 2005. Photo by Benedikt Partenheimer. Courtesy of Impronte contemporary art.

We are thinking through the origins of democracy and systemic racism and misogyny.

Studio Session: Jerome Reyes

Jerome Reyes. Pharos (still a nice neighborhood), 2016; ellipisodial stage lights, lightstands, projected text, outdoor building (3 language versions); 20 x 15 x 15 feet in various locations South of Market area, San Francisco. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Jeremy Keith Villaluz.

Jerome Reyes has a multifaceted art practice. We shoot hoops at the Gene Friend Rec Center, located on 6th and Folsom Street in San Francisco’s South of Market (SoMa) neighborhood, where many of the local youth, including the ones Reyes works with, hang out after school. Both Reyes and I are clearly out of practice. We pass the ball between misses and talk about the different aspects[…..]

Art Dives Underground in Downtown D.C.

bmoreart_balls

Today from our friends at BmoreArt we bring you a piece on an interactive art installation in an abandoned trolley station. Author Brendan L. Smith says of the space, “The curving walls of an oval-shaped room descend like stair steps next to a cluster of miniature buildings that resemble a child’s bristle-block creations.” This article was originally published on April 4, 2016. In an abandoned[…..]

Question Bridge: Black Males in America

Question Bridge: Black Males in America (Aperture/Campaign for Black Male Achievement, 2015)

Today we bring you an excerpt from Art Practical’s Printed Matters column. Roula Seikaly reviews Question Bridge: Black Males in America, the published companion to a project, platform, and installation that regards identity and representation. Seikaly notes, “Asking a question […] can be difficult; it can imply lack of knowledge and experience, rendering the asker vulnerable. No one wants to be caught out, least of all when the questions address identity, community, and most urgently,[…..]