Social Practice

Art Dives Underground in Downtown D.C.

bmoreart_balls

Today from our friends at BmoreArt we bring you a piece on an interactive art installation in an abandoned trolley station. Author Brendan L. Smith says of the space, “The curving walls of an oval-shaped room descend like stair steps next to a cluster of miniature buildings that resemble a child’s bristle-block creations.” This article was originally published on April 4, 2016. In an abandoned[…..]

Question Bridge: Black Males in America

Question Bridge: Black Males in America (Aperture/Campaign for Black Male Achievement, 2015)

Today we bring you an excerpt from Art Practical’s Printed Matters column. Roula Seikaly reviews Question Bridge: Black Males in America, the published companion to a project, platform, and installation that regards identity and representation. Seikaly notes, “Asking a question […] can be difficult; it can imply lack of knowledge and experience, rendering the asker vulnerable. No one wants to be caught out, least of all when the questions address identity, community, and most urgently,[…..]

Mónica Mayer: Si Tiene Dudas… Pregunte at Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo

Mónica Mayer. Lo normal, 1978 (detail); print intervened with stamps, 10 cards. Courtesy of the artist and Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo.

Si Tiene Dudas… Pregunte [When in Doubt… Ask] at the Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo (MUAC) is a retrocollective of works by feminist art pioneer Mónica Mayer (b. Mexico City, 1954). “Retrocollective” isn’t a very well-known term[1] and certainly not one that many artists would choose to designate their career retrospective, but Mónica Mayer isn’t like other artists. Since the late ’70s, Mayer has been[…..]

Connecting Intentionally: The Beginning of Blights Out

Blights out began in 2014 during Prospect.3: Notes for Now with Artist Lisa Sigal’s nstallations on houses in New Oreleans’ mid-city neighborhood. Courtesy of the Artist and Blights Out, New Orleans.

From our friends at Pelican Bomb, today we bring you an interview with Blights Out, a New Orleans project that “prioritizes transparency, interdisciplinary collaboration, community involvement, and creativity.” Blights Out is New York–based artist Lisa Sigal, New Orleans artist Carl Joe Williams, and arts activist Imani Jacqueline Brown. Author Rosemary Reyes says, “Blights Out looks to ignite conversations around the rapid economic development in New Orleans by ‘performing[…..]

Chen Qiulin: One Hundred Names at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney

Chen Qiulin carves tofu

What’s in a name? In ancient China, surnames represented clans and ancestral lineage, a highly significant aspect of identity and filial obligation. In contemporary parlance, the Chinese phrase “Lao Bai Xing” (literally, “the old hundred names”) translates as “the ordinary people” or “the common folk.” It often refers to the voiceless, those who are most powerless in the face of social forces. For many years, Chen Qiulin[…..]

Powerful Babies at the Spritmuseum

Allen Grubesic. I DIDN'T DO IT, 2015; one pair of shoes; size variable. Courtesy the Artist and Pi Artworks, Istanbul/London. NPC.

Keith Haring’s creative impact was influential, and he broadly changed the model of what it means to be an artist. Today that model is not just coopted, it’s a memetic standard. But the curious thing about a successful meme is that when its impression becomes ubiquitous, the origin is often forgotten. Curators Bill Arning and Rick Herron grapple with this dilemma and attempt to bridge[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: Whose Museum Is It Anyway?

Installation view of Mike Kelley at MoMA PS1, 2013. Photo: Matthew Septimus.

Here at Daily Serving, we keep an eye on the ways an exhibition’s impact changes depending on geographical location. With a recent editorial on what 30 Americans means in Detroit and December’s protest of omitting artists of color in Art AIDS America at the Tacoma Art Museum in mind, today we bring you Anuradha Vikram’s observations on shifting context, intended audiences, and racialized access to and[…..]