Social Practice

Help Desk: Support for Artists

Sigmar Polke. Untitled, 1971. Paint on fabric.

Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, patrons, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. I espouse fair labor initiatives like W.A.G.E. to pay artists.[1] However, my own projects are often un- or under-funded; if a stipend covers a significant portion of my expenses, that seems like a success, even[…..]

Taravat Talepasand: Not an Arab Spring at Beta Pictoris Gallery

. Taravat Talepasand. Khomeini, 2015; egg tempura on linen; 48 x 36 in.

Taravat Talepasand’s work takes on the representational codes and image systems of the Iranian state: national currency, political propaganda, religious iconography, and gendered forms of identity making. The paintings in Not an Arab Spring open up the ideological assumptions that index Iranian identity, state power, and gender in order to consider how the body (male and female) comes to signify the state as well as[…..]

Ding Yi: Ivory Black at ShanghArt

Ding Yi. Appearance of Crosses-13, 2013; acrylic on canvas; 140 cm x 200 cm. Photo: Courtesy of the Artist and ShanghArt gallery Singapore.

“Grids punctured with crosses in varying patterns” is perhaps the best—and admittedly, the most simplistic—way of summing up Ding Yi’s oeuvre. Ivory Black at the ShanghArt gallery is his latest iteration of these basic, severely geometric forms, in varying shades of blue, black, and white hues, distinguished only by date and serial number. Like an astronomer’s chart of the night sky, Ding’s gridded, ordered forms[…..]

Feast: Radical Hospitality in Contemporary Art at the Weisman Art Museum

Red76. Occupy Yr. Home Dinner, 2012; performance and installation, Chicago.

The exhibition Feast: Radical Hospitality in Contemporary Art originated with the University of Chicago’s Smart Museum of Art in 2012. Since then, it has had stops at the Blaffer in Houston, SITE Santa Fe, the Gund Gallery at Kenyon College, and is now on view at the University of Minnesota’s Weisman Art Museum. Founded on the idea of examining artists’ invocations of food as a[…..]

Anarchy, Tea, and After-Dinner Calligraphy: Interview with the Yangjiang Group

Yangjiang Group. Final Days, 2015; installation view, 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, wax and modified clothing installation,
dimensions variable. Commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. Courtesy the artists and Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou. Photo: Zan Wimberley

For contemporary Chinese artists Zheng Guogu, Chen Zaiyan, and Sun Qinglin—known as the Yangjiang Group—art is about social action and everyday life, including the practice of calligraphy, shopping, football, gambling, drinking, and eating. They believe art and life are entirely connected, resisting the commercialism of the art market and the over-intellectualization of art. Their latest project, Actions for Tomorrow, includes a live event, Tea Office, as a[…..]

José Antonio Vega Macotela at Prospect.3

Jose Antonio Vega Macotela. Time Exchange 291 (From Time Divisa), 2009; intervened book; 8.27 x 6.3 x 4.72 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Prospect.3

“My eternity has died and I am waking it.” –Violence of the Hours, Cesar Vallejo It sounds like a riddle: No one can buy more of it, and few have enough of it; it wears on the rich and poor equally; loss of it produces deep fear. Time’s ability to be transferred and manipulated is at the heart of José Antonio Vega Macotela’s mixed-media series[…..]

Who Pays Artists?

Anna Gray + Ryan Wilson Paulsen. 100 Posterworks, 2009-2013; printed poster; 11 x 17 in.

From our friends at Bad at Sports, today we bring you a synthesis of recent considerations on the economics of artist compensation. Author Abigail Satinsky asks, “Because if we do agree, yes artists should get paid, what then? Who are our choruses directed at?” This article was originally published on October 24, 2014. In a recent review in the New Yorker of the Brooklyn Museum’s exhibition of[…..]