Sound Art

The Lasting Concept at Portland Institute for Contemporary Art

Sara Greenberger Rafferty. Testing VIII, 2016 (detail); microphone stand and asparagus, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and (gallery). Photo: Evan La Londe/WORKSIGHTED

The Lasting Concept at Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA) is, by design, chronically unsure of its form. Initially conceptualized as a publication of the same name, the exhibition explores the nagging, process-driven revelation of being unable to excise a particular understanding from one’s thinking. With content that requires a method of digestion similar to reading, the exhibition’s connection to experimental publishing is evident. It’s[…..]

Cut-Up at Franklin Street Works

Phyllis Baldino. The Unknown Series, 1994–96 (detail); mixed media. Courtesy of the Artist.

“Everything in the world began with a yes. One molecule said yes to another molecule and life was born,” professes Clarice Lispector in the first lines of her 1977 novel, The Hour of the Star. Like the universe, art also begins with a yes. Some yeses are small: get out of bed today, put this image next to that one. Other yeses are bigger: continue[…..]

James Hoff: Bricking at the Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans

James Hoff. Skywiper No. 50, 2015; Chromaluxe transfer on aluminum; 60 x 40 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Callicoon Fine Arts, New York.

James Hoff: B=R=I=C=K=I=N=G is the first solo museum exhibition of the artist’s “virus paintings”—works shaped and mediated by Hoff’s engagement with digital technology and computer viruses as opposed to brush or paint. Functioning as a series of études to contemporary computer code, these paintings flirt consciously with the provocative gestures and meta-questions of conceptual art and the heavy visual language and history of abstraction. Shaped[…..]

Marina Rosenfeld and Ben Vida at Fridman Gallery

Marina Rosenfeld and Ben Vida. New Ear Festival, 2016 (performance still); sound performance. Courtesy of Fridman Gallery.

It is a strange thing to sit in a room for an hour and experience two people producing something unrecognizable. When successful, the relationship between the audience and the performers depends on generosity and trust. We, the audience, trust that we will be entertained, and so we open ourselves to the possibilities of the experience. In exchange for our receptivity, they, the performers, abandon certainty[…..]

Janet Cardiff: The Forty Part Motet at Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture

Janet Cardiff. The Forty Part Motet, 2001; installation view, Gallery 308, Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture, San Francisco, 2015. Courtesy of Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Photo: JKA Photography.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Henry Rittenberg reviews Janet Cardiff: The Forty Part Motet at Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture, co-presented by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, in San Francisco. Spem in[…..]

Interview with Angelica Mesiti

Artist Angelica Mesiti.

From our friends at Guernica, today we present an interview with Australian video and performance artist Angelica Mesiti. Author Naomi Riddle notes, “In Mesiti’s work, verbal language is decidedly absent. The artist is preoccupied with actions and movement—with the communicative potential of sound and the body, the significance of an upturned hand.” This article was originally published on November 2, 2015. I stood watching Australian artist[…..]

Tomás Saraceno: Arachnid Orchestra. Jam Sessions at NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore

Tomás Saraceno, Omega Centauri 1 Nephila Kenianensis 4 Cyrtophora citricola, 2014; Spidersilk, carbon fibre, light, Tripod. Courtesy of the artist and Esther Schipper Gallery, Berlin.

The gallery hums with screechy sounds resembling acoustic feedback, punctuated by random bursts of bass and cartoonish sound effects. The soundscape is queasily amorphous and disorienting, built on dissonance and the chaotic rhythms resonating from a handful of arachnids that have woven fine, thick webs around delicate wire frames. Featuring a plethora of spiderweb sound installations, Tomás Saraceno’s latest show Arachnid Orchestra. Jam Sessions is[…..]