Street Art / Public Art

Interview with Gabriela Golder

Gabriela Golder and Mariela Yeregui. Escrituras, 2014-2016; neon installation; variable dimensions. Photo: Alejandro Lipszyc

A series of neon signs appears over the urban landscape of Benito Pérez Galdós Avenue in La Boca, a working-class neighborhood located in the south of Buenos Aires. The poetic messages address territory, identity, and change: “Volvernos invisibles” [To become invisible], “El terreno se vuelve a mover” [The ground is moving again], and “El silencio es imposible” [Silence is impossible]. Despite the anonymity that public[…..]

The Guerrilla Girls and La Barbe at mfc-michèle didier

La Barbe. Au patriarcat, les hommes reconnaissants [To the patriarchy, the grateful men]; digital print; 8.3 x 11.7 in. Courtesy of La Barbe. Photo: Charles Duprat.

After thirty years of the Guerrilla Girls presenting statistics that repeatedly show the underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women in public collections, museums, and galleries around the world, one would think that these institutions would have been driven to promote changes en masse, if only out of shame. Yet, as the New York–based feminist group keeps evidencing, the archaic status quo in the art world has proven[…..]

Summer Session – Clint Mario and ME, @me_newyork

Clint Mario and ME, @me_newyork

It’s the last day of July—and with it, our final look at the theme of celebrity! We examined the complex intersections of fame, money, desire, and artistic practice this past month, and for our final installment we bring you an ongoing project in New York City by pseudonymic street artists Clint Mario and ME, whose self-reflexive ad takeovers speak to the inherent absurdity of celebrity’s constant jockeying for cultural ubiquity. Tomorrow[…..]

Art Dives Underground in Downtown D.C.

bmoreart_balls

Today from our friends at BmoreArt we bring you a piece on an interactive art installation in an abandoned trolley station. Author Brendan L. Smith says of the space, “The curving walls of an oval-shaped room descend like stair steps next to a cluster of miniature buildings that resemble a child’s bristle-block creations.” This article was originally published on April 4, 2016. In an abandoned[…..]

Andrew Birk: Callejero at Anonymous Gallery

Andrew Birk. Callejero, 2016; installation view, Anonymous Gallery, Mexico City. Courtesy the artist and Anonymous Gallery, Mexico City.

Andrew Birk is a gringo. I don’t mention this as an insult—I’m one too, after all—but to give some context to his work. The Portland, Oregon, native has lived in Mexico City since 2011 and has a clear affinity for the cacophony and vibrancy of this dense, sprawling metropolis. It is with the fresh eyes of an outsider that Birk is able to translate the[…..]

Connecting Intentionally: The Beginning of Blights Out

Blights out began in 2014 during Prospect.3: Notes for Now with Artist Lisa Sigal’s nstallations on houses in New Oreleans’ mid-city neighborhood. Courtesy of the Artist and Blights Out, New Orleans.

From our friends at Pelican Bomb, today we bring you an interview with Blights Out, a New Orleans project that “prioritizes transparency, interdisciplinary collaboration, community involvement, and creativity.” Blights Out is New York–based artist Lisa Sigal, New Orleans artist Carl Joe Williams, and arts activist Imani Jacqueline Brown. Author Rosemary Reyes says, “Blights Out looks to ignite conversations around the rapid economic development in New Orleans by ‘performing[…..]

Reformation: Public Art and the Philadelphia School Closures

Pepón Osorio. reForm, 2015; installation view, Temple University's Tyler School of Art. Photo: Constance Mensh.

Today from our friends at Pelican Bomb, we bring you Meredith Sellers’ article examining reForm, Pepón Osorio’s installation project at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. Sellers discusses reForm critically in the larger political context of Philadelphia school closures. She states, “The reForm project […] aims to create much-needed public discussion around the fate of the Philadelphia school system and to be a potential catalyst for change. But a classroom,[…..]