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Make Your Mother at G-CADD

Catalina Quyang. Bumpy Plank (Girl Against Whites), 2016 (detail); aqua resin, extruded polystyrene, steel, bondo, enamel paint, clear coat; 96 x 24 x 10 inches. Courtesy of The Granite City Art and Design District.

The Granite City Art and Design District (also known as G-CADD) is an art compound of galleries and outdoor exhibition spaces along one block of Granite City, Illinois, located across the river from downtown St. Louis. Their exhibition, Make Your Mother, is a multifaceted grouping of works that investigate mother/child relationships. Curated by JE Baker, the exhibition at the gallery named Insurance features the artists[…..]

Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks at the High Museum of Art

Jean-Michel Basquiat. Untitled Notebook Page, 1980-1981. Ink on ruled notebooks paper. 9 5/8 x 7 5/8 inches. Collection of Larry Warsh. Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, all rights reserved. Licensed by Artestar, New York. Photo courtesy of Sarah DeSantis, Brooklyn Museum.

The High Museum of Art’s current exhibition, Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks, presents the viewer with a “portrait of the artist as a poet.” Although the art world has been well aware of the importance and influence of language, writing, poetry, and experimental literary tactics on Jean-Michel Basquiat’s work for some time (the artist’s notebooks are hardly “unknown”), the presentation of his notebooks as the main[…..]

Jorge Macchi: Perspectiva at Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires

Jorge Macchi. Monoblock, 2013; paper. Courtesy of MALBA.

Maps, clocks, dictionaries, music sheets, signals, and words are all different resources we have to decode our reality. By living under a unified structure, we can rest assured that our messages will be understood. A sense of normality is reinforced. But what lies underneath these layers of language? Can we realize how reality is built around us? Do we know how to dismantle the rules[…..]

Anthony Discenza Presents A Novel: An Exhibition by Anthony Discenza at Catharine Clark Gallery

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Maria Porges’ review of Anthony Discenza Presents A Novel: An Exhibition by Anthony Discenza at Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “Achieving a successful understanding of the many layers [of the exhibition] yields a devious satisfaction.” This article was originally published on March 22, 2016. When or why does art become the idea of art:[…..]

Bring It Home: (Re)Locating Cultural Legacy Through the Body at San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery

Zeina Barakeh. Homeland Insecurity, 2015; single channel animated video, 6:00. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Scott Chernis.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an excerpt from Brian Karl’s review of Bring It Home: (Re)Locating Cultural Legacy Through the Body at the newly reopened San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery. The author notes, “Given the particularly intense struggles in the Bay Area today, where citizens are denied access to civil rights and basic resources by the structural discriminations of racialist and upward-funneling[…..]

From the Archives – Women’s Work at Smith College Museum of Art

Carolee Schneeman. Eye Body #1, 1963–79; gelatin-silver print with hand coloring and scratching; 14 in x 11 1/2 in. Courtesy of Smith College Art Museum, purchased with the Judith Plesser Targan, class of 1953, Fund.

We were delighted to see art-world activists the Guerrilla Girls on the Late Show with Stephen Colbert to promote their exhibition at the Walker, which opened last week (on view until December 31, 2016). To round out the historical context of second-wave feminism from which the Guerrilla Girls emerged, today we bring you Lia Wilson’s review of Women’s Work: Feminist Art From the Collection at[…..]

Galeria Piwna 20/26 Emilia and Andrzej Dłużniewski 1980–1993 at Galeria Monopol

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Galeria Piwna 20/26 Emilia and Andrzej Dłużniewski 1980–1993 at Monopol provides a rare glimpse into the history of an influential apartment gallery that operated in Warsaw for thirteen years. From the imposition of Martial Law through the collapse of the Berlin Wall and beyond, the Dłużniewskis exhibited artworks by Polish and international post-conceptual artists. The retrospective exhibition at Monopol resonates with an uneasy timeliness: Given the prevailing political[…..]