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Entang Wiharso: Never Say No at Singapore Tyler Print Institute

Entang Wiharso. Shelter: Forest of Eyes, 2015; Aluminium sheet, laser cut, C-type print; 127 × 184 × 3 cm. Courtesy of STPI.

Set in profile, a man casts a doleful eye on a smaller figure that perches on his forehead and pulls insistently at his tongue, while a miniature chainsaw balances threateningly on his head. The palm of his hand is pierced with a plant-like dagger, and little bodies tumble out feet-first from the bottom of his torso, already bearing knives and swords in preparation for a skirmish.[…..]

William Larson: Fireflies at Gitterman Gallery

William Larson. Untitled, 1971; electro-carbon print; 11 x 8 ½ in. © William Larson. Courtesy Gitterman Gallery.

The constant stream of digital information traveling around us over wires and airways is an increasingly recognized phenomenon. Over the past two decades, many artists have begun exploring the seemingly limitless possibilities of digital communication. However, long before the integration of once-mysterious electronic media into the art world in the 1990s, William Larson used a Graphic Sciences DEX 1 Teleprinter to produce some of the[…..]

On Kawara: Silence at the Guggenheim Museum

On Kawara. DEC. 29, 1977 (Thursday, New York), 1977, from Today series, 1966–2013; acrylic on canvas; 8 x 10 in; shown with artist-made cardboard storage box, 10-1/2 x 10-3/4 x 2 in. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner, New York/London and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.

The first retrospective since On Kawara’s death in July 2014, On Kawara—Silence at the Guggenheim Museum presents fifty years of the artist’s work. At the core of the exhibition are the daily practices that constituted Kawara’s life and art: the conceptual rituals that produced the Today, I Got Up, I Met, I Went, and I Am Still Alive series. Each series represents a different way[…..]

Gilbert & George: Utopian Pictures at Arndt Gallery

Gilbert & George. God Guides Us, 2014; 151cm × 191cm. Photo: Courtesy of Arndt gallery and the artists.

In the 21st-century lexicon of urban development, the term utopia has all but vanished from the descriptors of a contemporary city. It’s more comfortably consigned to the archaic vocabulary of 18th-century academia. Yet it remains a silent ideological underpinning of economic policies, an elusive goal that governments strive toward but leave unacknowledged—seen, for instance, in laws forbidding “transgressive” behavior, constant political entanglements, or even in perpetual urban[…..]

Barbara Kruger: Early Works at Skarstedt Gallery

Barbara Kruger. Untitled (Don't buy us with apologies), 1986; photostat print in artist's frame; 48 3/4 x

54 7/8 in. (123.8 x 139.5 cm.) framed. Courtesy of the Artist and Skarstedt.

It’s a funny thing to be able to go back and reconsider an artist’s early works after thirty years, partly because the time capsule of memory remembers the work in the context in which it was made. Viewing the work again in the present reflects the context of that prior time as it’s understood now. The aggressively fast-paced 1980s are faster in memory than they[…..]

From the Archives – Paul Thek: If you don’t like this book you don’t like me

Spread from Paul Thek notebook #63, 1974; Courtesy Watermill Center Collection and Alexander and Bonin, New York; Photograph © Estate of George Paul Thek; Photograph Jörg Lohse

In consideration of the second day of the Los Angeles Art Book Fair, today we bring you a look back at a 2012 exhibition of Paul Thek’s books. Author Magdalen Chua describes the artist’s notebooks as filled with, “illustrations, drawings, and watercolor works [that] suggest a mind filled with both doubt and idealism.” This article was originally published on May 16, 2012. As part of the Glasgow International Festival of[…..]

Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art

Jean-Michel Basquiat. Charles the First, 1982; acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas; three panels, 78 x 65 in. Courtesy of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, New York © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an assessment of Jordana Moore Saggese’s new monograph, Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art. Of Basquiat’s work, reviewer Anton Stuebner notes: “[the] canvases require viewers to […] recognize that the boundaries of pictorial representation, like language, can be redefined and reformed.” This article was originally published on October 7, 2014. The mythology around Jean-Michel Basquiat continues to proliferate in[…..]