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Deeply Concentric: An Interview with Yael Kanarek

Yael Kanarek. Installation view (l-r): Sanctify Thyself No. 1; Deeply Concentric; Perpetual Dream Catcher; all 2013. Photo by John Berens. Image courtesy bitforms gallery nyc.

Yael Kanarek is interested in the signs and systems that we use to quantify and communicate knowledge, specifically words and numbers. She focuses on the spaces where meaning is conveyed or lost as it passes through cultural and disciplinary frameworks, while her work fluctuates between painting, sculpture, and time-based interactivity. She has exhibited at The Drawing Center and in the 2002 Whitney Biennial and has received numerous awards,[.....]

Postscript: An Ambitious Take on Conceptual Art and Writing at the Power Plant

Kenneth Goldsmith, Soliloquy, 1996.

Upon entering Toronto’s Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery to see Postscript: Writing After Conceptual Art, the viewer is immediately confronted by a raucous wash of sonorous elements. Over fifty artists and conceptual writers occupy the gallery space; canonical works from Andy Warhol, Sol LeWitt, Marcel Broodthaers, Carl Andre, and Dan Graham are nestled among pieces by contemporary practitioners, contributing to the sense of saturation. Originally curated[.....]

AFRICOBRA: Philosophy at the Logan Center

Barbara Jones-Hogu, "Unite," 1968-71; screenprint; 25.5 x 35 in. Courtesy of the artist and Logan Center for the Arts.

The assembly of works by AFRICOBRA (African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists), a collective of African American Chicago-based artists active during the 1960s and 1970s, now on display at the Logan Center for the Arts could fairly be described as a time capsule; it is more important for the moment it captures than for its contents. In addition to this exhibition, titled AFRICOBRA: Philosophy, the collective currently has two other[.....]

Chun Kwang Young: Assemblage

Chun Kwang Young. Aggregation 07 DE146, 2007 (detail); mixed media with Korean mulberry paper; 250 x 205 cm. Image courtesy of Michael Culme-Seymour and Art Plural gallery.

Chun Kwang Young’s Assemblage at Art Plural Gallery is a series of three-dimensional sculptural works wrapped with Korean mulberry paper and assembled within the two-dimensional frame of a canvas. Taking the ubiquitous use of the mulberry paper in Korea—also known as hanji—as a material point of reference, the Assemblage series explores a desolate landscape of depressions, protrusions and coloured spots, all of which seem to reference abstract painting’s visual language of prioritising[.....]

Aesthetics of the Spectacle

Kate Bonner

In societies where modern conditions of production prevail, all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles. Everything that was directly lived has moved away into representation. —Guy Dubord, Society of the Spectacle, 1967 The Bay Area is the social media capital of the world; with headquarters for Google, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, it is no surprise that everywhere you go, people are[.....]

Tracey Emin at Lehmann Maupin: The Carry

Tracey Emin’s work presents an unfiltered and often embarrassingly personal view of emotional pain. It reflects the kind of desperate or careless narcissism that is the territory of the depressed. Emin is concerned with the primacy of her own experience—and the narrative of her own sadness is the unabashed subject of her work. Emin’s oeuvre has always felt most valuable to me in terms of[.....]

Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows

The very first thing you see when visiting Stefan Stagmeister’s “The Happy Show” at MOCA’s Pacific Design Center is wall text boldly declaring: “THIS EXHIBITION WILL NOT MAKE YOU HAPPIER.” While the text may seem like a cheeky and sarcastic pre-summarization of the content, Stagmeister sets the stage for his internal conflicts.  The information presented on the walls ranges from dry, yet poignant data, to[.....]