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The St. Petersburg Paradox at Swiss Institute

The St. Petersburg Paradox, installation view, Swiss Institute. (from left to right) Sarah Ortmeyer. SANKT PETERSBURG PARADOX, 2014: marble chessboards, copper, iron, brass and aluminum chess tables, natural (ostrich, rhea, goose, chicken, mallard, quail, emu, and duck) eggs, artificial (marble obsidian, alabaster, and onyx) eggs; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Dvir Gallery, Tel Aviv. Tabor Robak. A*, 2014; 14-channel HD video; 9:46 min. Courtesy of the artist and team (gallery, inc.). John Miller. Labyrinth I, 1999; acrylic on canvas with sound component; 54 x 70 in. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York. Kaspar Müller. Tropic of Cancer, 2014; laser prints on A3 paper; each 12 x 15 ½ in. Courtesy Galerie Francesca Pia, Zürich, The Green Gallery, Milwaukee, and Federico Vavassori, Milan. Cayetano Ferrer. Remnant Recomposition, 2014; carpet remnants, seam tape; 18 x 60 ft. Courtesy of the artist.

The St. Petersburg Paradox, currently on view at Swiss Institute, is a group show of refreshing intellectual rigor. The exhibition’s curatorial design is so tightly wound that it forms a kind of singular entity in which each featured artwork compels the viewer to consider the philosophy of its larger scheme: namely, the metaphysics of gambling. The title refers to a paradox of human psychology: When[.....]

Rirkrit Tiravanija: Time Travelers Chronicle (Doubt): 2014 – 802,701 A.D at Singapore Tyler Print Institute

Rirkrit Tiravanija. Sixth chapter: take the spin off, unwind, reverse directions, and shatter the bonsai, on the way back don't forget to smile, 2013; screen print, metal foil, cast paper, STPI handmade cotton paper, stainless steel pedestal, 3D printed object; 259.5 x 259.5 cm; 4 sheets. Image courtesy of Singapore Tyler Print Institute.

“There is no difference between Time and any of the three dimensions of Space except that our consciousness moves along it.”—H.G. Wells, The Time Machine (1895) In 1992, Rirkrit Tiravanija converted the spaces of 303 Gallery in New York into a kitchen where he served rice and Thai curry to a crowd that became unwitting participants in a hybrid installation titled Untitled (Free). Seven years[.....]

Isa Genzken: Retrospective at MCA Chicago

Installation view, Isa Genzken: Retrospective, MCA Chicago. April 12-August 3, 2014. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.

Perhaps the most striking aspect of Isa Genzken: Retrospective—an expansive four-decade survey of the German artist’s work at MCA Chicago featuring sculpture, film, installation, painting, and photography—is the fact that it was all made by the same person. Over the course of her career, Genzken has successfully assimilated a wide array of styles without losing sight of a handful of core concerns: architectural structure, the[.....]

#Hashtags: Critiquing Museums from the Outside In

The Broad_exterior rendering

#museums #architecture #philanthropy #urban development #institutional critique #spectacle #metaphor In January, the Los Angeles 2020 Commission, a group of thirteen experts convened by the Los Angeles City Council to assess the city’s civic problems, delivered a damning report. Titled “A Time for Truth,” it begins with the statement “Los Angeles is barely treading water while the rest of the world is moving forward,” and gets[.....]

Valuing Labor in the Arts: Reigniting Public Art Policy as Social Practice

Jeremy Deller, Scott King and William Morris. A poster in response to the British government’s 2010 proposal to cut funding for the arts by 25 percent.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Jeffrey Skoller’s response to the workshop “Appropriate Technologies,” which was part of the practicum Valuing Labor in the Arts hosted by the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley. Skoller asserts, “Given how many young artists today are making art as social practice, relational aesthetics, and cultural activism, and who are devoting their careers to social activism, it is striking that there is[.....]

#Hashtags: On Disgust

Rina Banerjee. She was now in western style dress covered in part of Empires' ruffle and red dress, had a foreign and peculiar race, a Ganesha who had lost her head, was thrown across sea until herself shipwrecked. A native of Bangladesh lost foot to root in Videsh, followed her mother full stop on forehead, trapped tongue of horn and grew ram-like under stress, 2011. Cowrie shells, rooster feather, gourds, acrylic horns, ceramic balls, plastic netting, amber glass vials, violet glass bulbs, false glass doe eyeballs, silk and synthetic Lanvin ruffled red dress. 73 x 65 in. dia. (185.4 x 165.1 cm).
Copyright Rina Banerjee. Courtesy L.A. Louver, Venice, CA.

#other #violence #misogyny #racism #Orientalism #hybridity An act of senseless violence at UC Santa Barbara this past week has reignited an online conversation about the interrelationship between race, gender, discrimination, and violence. While the tweets and subsequent articles around #yesallwomen have drawn public attention to the gendered assumptions that underpin violent behavior, less visibility has accrued to the role that Orientalism played in dehumanizing and[.....]

Value/Labor/Arts: The Manifestos

W.A.G.E., Artist Payment Graphic, excerpt from W.A.G.E. graphic poster of artist survey results, 2011.

From our friends at Art Practical, today we bring you a publication that is more archive than article: Value/Labor/Arts: The Manifestos was one part of the spectacular issue “Valuing Labor in the Arts” that was guest-edited by Shannon Jackson, Director of the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley. Compiled by Jackson and artist Helena Keeffe, Value/Labor/Arts: The Manifestos presents seven “recent and… not-so-very-old manifestos of artists who found[.....]