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Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, Ponte City, 2008-ongoing; installation view, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. Courtesy of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Ian Reeves.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Larissa Archer‘s review of Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa, currently on view at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. The review highlights the work of photographers Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, whose portraits, video projects, and zines reveal the lives of the residents living in a famous Brutalist building in Johannesburg. This article[.....]

Take Ecstasy With Me at The Whitney Biennial

Jacolby Satterwhite, Reifying Desire 5, 2014 (performance still); duration varied. Courtesy of the artist and The Whitney Museum, New York. Photo: Filip Wolak.

“It would deeply heal me,” artist Jorge Cortiñas urged, “if we all sang this song together.” The ensuing karaoke-like moment was the climax of Cortiñas’ performance, Back Room, which re-told the contentious story of meeting a future lover during an orgy in the dark rear of a now-extinct East Village bar—a story that none of Cortiñas’ straight friends ever wanted to hear. Such tongue-in-cheek emotional self-indulgence invigorated[.....]

Malick Sidibé at Jack Shainman Gallery

Malick Sidibé. Pique-Nique à la Chaussée, 1972/2008; silver gelatin print, 17 x 17 in. (image size). Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Malick Sidibé’s photographs at Jack Shainman Gallery in New York City. Malick Sidibé’s photographs of Mali, Africa, at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York, are an ethnographic[.....]

Paradise Lost at the Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore

Trinh T. Minh-ha. Surname Viet Given Name Nam, 1989 (film still); 16mm; 108 min. Courtesy of Moongift Films.

“Southern Asia, in general, is the seat of awful images and associations. As the cradle of the human race, it would alone have a dim and reverential feeling connected with it… [the] mere antiquity of Asiatic things, of their institutions, histories, modes of faith, &c., is so impressive, that to me the vast age of the race and name overpowers the sense of youth in[.....]

#Hashtags: The Global in the Local

Wendelien van Oldenborgh. La Javanaise, 2012. Film production still. Photo by Bárbara Wagner.

#globalization #museums #access #representation #decolonization #history A recent conference at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, “Collecting Geographies—Global Programming and Museums of Modern Art,” invited participants to question the responsibilities accrued to arts institutions when they present works of global cultural production as a response to market interest. Each of the topics raised by these questions—globalization, colonial collections, and the critical history of the museum among[.....]

Subverting the Sublime: Wondermountain at Penrith Regional Gallery

Hua Tunan, Fluorescent impression shanshui, 2013, spray paint, 300 x 500, image courtesy the artist

It seemed entirely appropriate that my journey to see Wondermountain at the Penrith Regional Gallery and Lewers Bequest was through rain, a concrete landscape of freeways and overpasses obscured by my windscreen wipers. I arrived beside the swollen Nepean River, the Blue Mountains shrouded in mist, reflecting on the continuing importance of shanshui (mountain/water) painting. A poetic approach to representing landscape evolving from the Tang Dynasty, the[.....]

#Hashtags: The Social and the Political

#engagement #social practice #institutions #academia #authenticity #representation Berkeley has lately been abuzz with social practice of a politically conscious nature that befits the People’s Republic. The Berkeley Art Museum is presenting David Wilson’s The Possible, an exhibition as creative platform that includes numerous artist collaborators and participatory activities for the public. Concurrent with that exhibition, UC Berkeley’s Center for South Asia Studies presented the conference “Collecting[.....]