Video / Film

Summer Session – Five Tips for Teaching with Works of Art

For our countdown to September we’re going Back to School, which means examining works concerned with teaching and learning, revisiting the state of education in the arts, and providing pedagogical resources for teachers and students. Today we bring you a video from our friends at the Museum of Modern Art that offers strategies for teaching with works of art. While the video is geared toward teaching younger children, the tips[…..]

Summer Session – The Artist Who Inspired Kanye West’s “Famous” Visuals Responds to the Video

Famous

This Summer Session we’re thinking about celebrity, and today we bring you an excerpt from an article by Erica Gonzales about Kanye West’s re-creation of artist Vincent Desiderio’s work for his music video “Famous.” Desiderio was neither consulted nor compensated before West made the video, yet he asserts that he was honored by West, exemplifying the social, economic, and artistic realities of what it means to have[…..]

Summer Session – Do You Believe in Television? Chris Burden and TV

Chris Burden, still from TV Hijack, 1972. Photo: G. Beydler. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery, © Chris Burden.

This Summer Session we’re thinking about celebrity, which necessarily includes the ways in which celebrity is most easily produced and consumed—that is, we’re also thinking about television. Today we bring you an excerpt from an article published on East of Borneo by Nick Stillman, regarding Chris Burden’s television performances of the 1970s, which used the medium of television to challenge the consumerist ethos it perpetuated, unlike its complicit[…..]

The Power of Pictures: Early Soviet Photography and Film at Frist Center for the Arts

Arkady Sheikhet. Assembling the Globe at the Moscow Telegraphic Central Station, 1928; Gelatin silver print; 17 ¾ x 13 3/8 in. Collection of Alex Lachmann. Courtesy of Nailya Alexander Gallery.

The Power of Pictures: Early Soviet Photography and Film presents a dynamic portrait of one of the most significant narratives in the history of 20th-century avant-garde art, and examines the vital place of still and moving images in the creation of early Soviet history and national identity. Originally organized by the Jewish Museum in New York under the curatorial vision of Jens Hoffmann, this exhibition[…..]

Young Blood: Noah Davis, Kahlil Joseph, the Underground Museum at Frye Art Museum

Noah Davis and Kahlil Joseph. The Sacred Garden, 2016; installation view. Design and production: Commonwealth Projects. Photo: Mark Woods.

Currently on view at Frye Art Museum, Young Blood is a large-scale exhibition of two prominent contemporary artists and brothers, painter Noah Davis and filmmaker Kahlil Joseph. The most elaborate display of their individual works to date, Young Blood includes painting, film, sculpture, and installation, weaving varied mediums together with precision and fluidity. Through the tone and cadence of their depicted world—one of beauty, mystery,[…..]

Paola Pivi: Ma’am at Dallas Contemporary Museum

Paola Pivi. Installation view of Ma'am, 2016. Photo by Kevin Todora. Image courtesy Dallas Contemporary.

Paola Pivi’s exhibition, Ma’am, at the Dallas Contemporary Museum fills the galleries with colorful creatures and inflatables, coffee beans, feathers, and faux pearls. Visual tricks and gags, sensorial puns, and oddities—these are the territory of Pivi’s sculptures, photographs, films, and interventions. Her monumentally scaled, untitled airplane work—a small Fiat G-91 placed upside-down on the floor—guards the entrance into the space. Around the corner, a swath of[…..]

Interview with Carlos Motta

Carlos Motta. Patriots, Citizens, Lovers..., 2015; installation view.  PinchukArtCentre, Kiev. Courtesy of Instituto de Visión, Bogotá, Mor Charpentier Galerie, Paris, and Galeria Filomena Soares, Lisbon.

Today from our friends at BOMB Magazine, we bring you an interview with artist Carlos Motta. Author Cat Tyc writes, “Motta’s research-based practice is constituted by discursive spaces, presented in a variety of different spatial forms, which create—in his own words—’counter-narratives that recognize suppressed histories, communities, and identities.’” This article was originally published May 6, 2016. Cat Tyc: At your artist talk at Pratt Institute, you[…..]