Video / Film

Antonia Wright: You Make Me Sick: I Love You at Spinello Projects

Antonia Wright. Suddenly We Jumped (2),2014 (video still); single channel video, 00:14. Courtesy the artist and Spinello Projects, Miami.

If Antonia Wright ever tires of being an artist and desires a career change, she might find success as a stuntwoman. In a number of videos in her show You Make Me Sick: I Love You at Spinello Projects in Miami, she has transformed her body into a projectile, hurling herself through glass, piles of books, and into oncoming cars. The feelings of danger and[.....]

Ryan Trecartin at LACMA

Considered a prophet of the digital age, video artist Ryan Trecartin transforms contemporary culture’s addiction to the internet and obsession with technological devices into a violently exuberant visual orgy. Watching his work feels like riding a roller coaster into the vertiginous depths of the Web or looking through a kaleidoscope on acid; it is an experience of hysterical nonlinearity, relentless mutation, and extreme visual and verbal cacophony. On March 25,[.....]

Wages for Facebook at Kadist Art Foundation

Laurel Ptak (left) and Christina Linden (right).

Last Wednesday, Kadist Art Foundation and curator Christina Linden hosted a conversation with artist Laurel Ptak, the author/founder of Wages for Facebook, a manifesto (based on the 1975 manifesto Wages Against Housework) that calls for a reconsideration of what it means to participate in a system of for-profit social exchange. To a packed house, Ptak began her talk by showing slides of publications that have printed information, opinions, and reactions to[.....]

Trevor Shimizu: Again at 47 Canal and Rachel Mason: Starseeds at envoy enterprises

Rachel Mason. Yayoi Kusama, 2014; mixed media, dimensions varied. Courtesy of the artist and envoy enterprises.

Again, now at 47 Canal, presents a new set of paintings by Trevor Shimizu featuring more of the artist’s characteristically banal domestic caricatures. Of these, Shimizu’s sex paintings are his best. Featuring sketches of video monitors displaying stick figures engaged in BDSM porn, a vaginal close-up nestled next to a box of tissues, or a pop-up ad for penis enhancement, the paintings read as swiftly[.....]

Paradise Lost at the Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore

Trinh T. Minh-ha. Surname Viet Given Name Nam, 1989 (film still); 16mm; 108 min. Courtesy of Moongift Films.

“Southern Asia, in general, is the seat of awful images and associations. As the cradle of the human race, it would alone have a dim and reverential feeling connected with it… [the] mere antiquity of Asiatic things, of their institutions, histories, modes of faith, &c., is so impressive, that to me the vast age of the race and name overpowers the sense of youth in[.....]

Yarn Trails: Visual Resonance Among Three Exhibitions in Chicago

Detail of Academic Connections: Media Atlas, 2014, an undertaking of Professor W.J.T. Mitchell’s Theories of Media class students, in a gallery at the Smart Museum of the University of Chicago. Photo: Saul Rosenfield.

The typical museum experience is controlled. A pathway describes a route from one artwork to another, each illustrated by its label and narrated by an audio tour. However, three exhibitions currently on view in Chicago invite the visitor to engage in a less predictable process. At the University of Chicago’s Smart Museum of Art, visual-culture scholar W.J.T. Mitchell and the students of his “Theories of[.....]

Art(ists) on the Verge at the Soap Factory

Katie Hargrave, In Poor Tastes Good, 2014; mixed media, dimensions variable. Courtesy The Soap Factory. Photo by Lillian Egner.

Now through April, the sprawling, rough-and-tumble brick spaces of Minneapolis’ Soap Factory are filled with installation projects by five artists—the Art(ists) on the Verge, as it were. It is not quite fair to consider Art(ists) on the Verge as a single exhibition, as there is no curatorial or artistic conceit to cement the various projects into a cohesive entity. The works on view are the[.....]