Video / Film

Between Citizenry and Privilege: Ai Weiwei and Bouchra Khalili

Ai Weiwei and Rowlit Chawla. Weiwei on Lesvos Beach, 2016. Photo: Rowlit Chawla for India Today.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you Jordan Amirkhani’s article from 8.1: Art + Citizenship. Amirkhani discusses the recent work of artists Ai Weiwei and Bouchra Khalili as they respond to global crises. Amirkhani quotes Hannah Arendt, who speaks to citizenship and  those who lack the “rights to rights,” saying, “If a human being loses his political status, he should, according to the implications of the inborn[…..]

Bruce Conner: It’s All True

Bruce Conner. UNTITLED, from MANDALA SERIES, 1965; felt-tip pen on paper; 10 x 10 in. Courtesy San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Among the works at the threshold of Bruce Conner: It’s All True, a massive retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), PRINTS (1974) is atypical even for the protean artist.[1] Consisting of a steel lockbox containing photographs, documents, and fingerprints, PRINTS records a protracted dispute between Conner and San Jose State University, which had invited him to teach in its art department.[…..]

Teiji Furuhashi: Lovers at the Museum of Modern Art

Teiji Furuhashi. Lovers, 1994; computer controlled, five-channel laser disc/sound installation with five projectors, two sound systems, two slide projectors, and slides (color, sound). Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art. © 2016 Dumb Type.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Yuting Bai reviews Teiji Furuhashi: Lovers at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Standing solemnly as an apocalyptic coda to[…..]

Jennifer and Kevin McCoy: Broker at Postmasters Gallery

Jennifer & Kevin McCoy. BROKER (still), 2016; video, 28 minutes. Courtesy of the Artists and Postmasters Gallery. Photo: Evan Schwartz

The Postmasters Gallery’s arched storefront entrance on Franklin Street in New York City’s Financial District conjures an era long gone, when artists inhabited the raw lofts of the area. High ceilings with brick and rustic Corinthian columns belie the sleek high-rise trend seeping into the city, which aptly form the setting of Jennifer and Kevin McCoy’s latest exhibition, BROKER. Well-loved for their maquettes often featuring[…..]

From the Archives — Pipilotti Rist: Worry Will Vanish and Stay Stamina Stay at Hauser & Wirth

This week, the New Museum opened a major exhibition of works by path-breaking multimedia and video artist Pipilotti Rist. As author Elspeth Walker observed in her 2015 review, Rist’s work confounds the divide between the human body, the natural world, and video technologies. Fielding otherworldly experiences made from footage of this world, Rist’s installation likely felt hypnotic to many viewers for a reason—she drew inspiration from[…..]

Fan Mail: Meeson Pae Yang

Meeson Pae Yang. Index, 2005–06; steel, glass, fluorescent lights, Plexiglas, sucrose solution, vinyl tubing, electrical components, vacuum-sealed packaging, latex, silicone, silicone tubing, polyurethane, trimmer line, nylon fittings; 78 x 114 x 36 in. Courtesy of El Camino College, Torrance, CA and the Artist.

Science and art have a variably rocky relationship in contemporary culture; it is not unusual to encounter people who believe these fields to be opposites on the spectrum of human inquiry. But Meeson Pae Yang’s body of work rejects such binary thinking. Her practice utilizes the affective and technical qualities of the natural sciences to create large works and immersive environments that direct viewers’ gazes[…..]

Dineo Seshee Bopape

Today from our friends at Kadist, we bring you a video interview with South African artist Dineo Seshee Bopape. She speaks about artist-run spaces in Johannesburg, a new work commissioned by the Montreal Biennale, her current show Untitled (of Occult Instability) [Feelings] at Palais de Tokyo, and the relationship between sound and image in her video Why Do You Call Me When You Know I Can’t[…..]