Video / Film

Manifesto at the Park Avenue Armory

Julian Rosefeldt. Manifesto, 2015; installation view, Park Avenue Armory, New York. Courtesy of Park Avenue Armory. Photo: James Ewing.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bai Yuting reviews Julian Rosefeldt: Manifesto the Park Avenue Armory. This winter, the Park Avenue Armory presents the German cinematographer Julian Rosefeldt’s thirteen-channel video installation, Manifesto (2015).[…..]

Soulèvements (Uprisings) at the Jeu de Paume

Dennis Adams. Patriot, 2002; C-print mounted on aluminum; 40.5 x 54 in. Courtesy of Centre National des Arts Plastiques, Paris. Photo: Galerie Gabrielle Maubrie.

What if the imagination made mountains rise up? Georges Didi-Huberman poses this question in Soulèvements (Uprisings), a new exhibition at the Jeu de Paume National Gallery in Paris. Throughout the museum’s galleries, contemporary artworks, books, historical documents, and photographs present a potent survey on the theme of social rebellions in the West, ranging from Victor Hugo’s call for the abolition of the death penalty (in[…..]

La Biennale de Montréal: Le Grand Balcon at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal

Anne Imhof. Angst III, 2016; performance. Courtesy of La Biennale de Montréal. Photo: Jonas Leihener

There is admittedly a little bit of confusion when one arrives at La Biennale de Montréal’s main venue, the Musée d’Art Contemporain (MAC), for a great part of the biennale does not in fact take place at the MAC. With eighteen satellite venues beyond walking distance and inaccurate information from its front-line stewards, trekking through extreme winter conditions in the land of the tragic 19th-century[…..]

Odd Jobs: Danielle Dean

Danielle Dean. Hexafluorosilicic, 2015; installation view at Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome back to Odd Jobs, where artists talk about their varied and nontraditional career arcs. For this installment, I spoke to Danielle Dean—born to a Nigerian father and an English mother in Alabama—whose interdisciplinary practice draws from this multinational background. Her work explores the interpellation of thoughts, feelings, and social relations by power structures working through news, advertising, political speech, and digital media. She has[…..]

Best of 2009 – Moby Dick

Moby Dick at the Wattis Institute, 2009.

We are looking back on a decade of Daily Serving’s greatest hits, and today’s selection comes from Shotgun Reviews editor Jen Stager: “‘This great white interior was empty even when it was full, because most of what was in it didn’t belong in it and would soon be purged from it. This was people, mainly, and what they brought with them from outside,’ wrote David[…..]

Between Citizenry and Privilege: Ai Weiwei and Bouchra Khalili

Ai Weiwei and Rowlit Chawla. Weiwei on Lesvos Beach, 2016. Photo: Rowlit Chawla for India Today.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you Jordan Amirkhani’s article from 8.1: Art + Citizenship. Amirkhani discusses the recent work of artists Ai Weiwei and Bouchra Khalili as they respond to global crises. Amirkhani quotes Hannah Arendt, who speaks to citizenship and  those who lack the “rights to rights,” saying, “If a human being loses his political status, he should, according to the implications of the inborn[…..]

Bruce Conner: It’s All True

Bruce Conner. UNTITLED, from MANDALA SERIES, 1965; felt-tip pen on paper; 10 x 10 in. Courtesy San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Among the works at the threshold of Bruce Conner: It’s All True, a massive retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), PRINTS (1974) is atypical even for the protean artist.[1] Consisting of a steel lockbox containing photographs, documents, and fingerprints, PRINTS records a protracted dispute between Conner and San Jose State University, which had invited him to teach in its art department.[…..]