Video / Film

Mike Kelley: Single Channel Videos at REDCAT

Mike Kelley. Extracurricular Activity Projective Reconstruction #1 (Domestic Scene), 2000 (film still); black and white, 29:44 min. Art © Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts. All Rights Reserved/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

Nearing the fourth anniversary of Mike Kelley’s death, REDCAT presented a theatrical screening of six of his video works, curated by Steve Anker and Bérénice Reynaud as part of the Jack H. Skirball Series. The selection of works in Mike Kelley: Single Channel Videos included a one-act melodrama based on a black-and-white yearbook photograph, a hammy and melancholic Superman reciting Sylvia Plath, an invocation of power through[…..]

Laurie Anderson: Heart of a Dog

Laurie Anderson, Heart of a Dog, 2015 (still). Courtesy the artist and Abramorama Entertainment.

Artist Laurie Anderson opens Heart of a Dog by recounting a rather bizarre dream. Illustrated on the screen through sketchy black-and-white drawings and narrated in Anderson’s calm, comely voice, the artist gives birth to her dog, Lolabelle, the spectral rat terrier who becomes in some ways (though in others not) the star of the film. After being presented with her bundle, Anderson’s dream self feels very[…..]

Otobong Nkanga in Conversation with Clare Molloy at Kadist Paris

From our friends at Kadist Art Foundation in Paris, today we bring you a video of Clare Molloy in conversation with Nigerian artist Otobong Nkanga. They discuss Nkanga’s exhibition Comot Your Eyes Make I Borrow You Mine, which was on view from September 27 through December 20, 2015. Nkanga says, explaining the title, “In a way, traveling and going through all these places, I had only the eyes of others.” 

Cold Storage: James Cordas and Rhonda Holberton

Rhonda Holberton, Knights of the Sky, Digital video projection, 3:24 (looping), Edition 1/1, 2015. Courtesy of City Limits Gallery.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Elena Gross reviews Cold Storage: James Cordas and Rhonda Holberton at City Limits Gallery in Oakland. A chilly, overcast afternoon seemed like the perfect[…..]

Joel Holmberg: You’ll Never Know If You Don’t Ask Yourself at Atlanta Contemporary

JoelHolmberg_Cleopatras

Joel Holmberg’s newest installation, You’ll Never Know If You Don’t Ask Yourself, expands our understanding of what it means to watch, witness, and experience information through the infinite cyclical stream of live media coverage within the institutional parameters of the art gallery. Currently on view at the Atlanta Contemporary, Holmberg’s display is simple and striking, consisting of six videos that emanate short clips culled from[…..]

Jennifer Moon, Jemima Wyman, and Robby Herbst at Commonwealth & Council

Jennifer Moon. 3CE: A Relational Love Odyssey, 2015; HD Video (TRT: 11:15); edition of 3 + 1 AP. Courtesy the artist and Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles.

As contemporary art seems to be increasingly the province of the 1%, with continual record-breaking auctions, it may be difficult to appreciate the revolutionary origins of modernism. Early 20th-century art movements like Constructivism, Futurism, and Dada sought an aesthetic, social, and political break with the past, often with utopian goals for the future. A trio of solo shows at Commonwealth & Council aim to reinvigorate[…..]

Bechdel Test Movie Night: Foxy Brown

Alison Bechdel. Bechdel Test, c. 1985; Dykes to Watch Out For. Courtesy of the Artist.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Tanya Gayer reviews Bechdel Test Movie Night: Foxy Brown  at New Parkway Theater in Oakland. Foxy Brown (1974) is widely described as a blaxploitation film—a genre that[…..]