Posts Tagged ‘advertising’

Pia Camil: The Little Dog Laughed at Blum & Poe

Pia Camil, The Little Dog Laughed, Installation view, 2014, Blum & Poe, Los Angeles; l. Asfalto, 2014, Hand dyed and stitched canvas, 94 1/2 x 94 1/2 inches.
r. The little dog laughed, 2014, Hand dyed and stitched canvas, 108 1/4 x 330 11/16 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles

Pia Camil’s hand-dyed and stitched canvases offer a fresh approach to the well-worn field of geometric abstraction. For her first solo show in Los Angeles, this Mexico City-based artist has created four large, square wall works whose surfaces are divided into loose grids of colored stripes. Each work has a dominant color theme—cream, tan, blue, and purple—with brighter accents of yellow, red, and peach. Within[…..]

Best of 2013 – Robert Heinecken at Cherry & Martin

For today’s installment of our Best of 2013 series, we have a selection from co-founder Seth Curcio, who writes, “Robert Heinecken has always lived near the top of my favorites list. So, reading this lovely review of his recent project in LA was a nice little surprise. It gave me the opportunity to reflect on how Heinecken’s work operates in today’s context—shedding light on how[…..]

Fan Mail: Senan Lee & Pansy Aung, a.k.a. Salt ’n’ Pepper Squid

Senan Lee & Pansy Aung. The Diving Bell, 2013; Recycled cardboard; 80 x 80 x 80 cm. Courtesy the artists.

Senan Lee and Pansy Aung make up the duo Salt’n’Pepper Squid, and they specialize in making innovative and often humorous advertising campaigns that range from magazine spreads to promotional videos. Their recent evolution from individual creative producers to collaborators—in June of this year—has inspired new ways of thinking that reach beyond the campaigns the duo are accustomed to making. In September, they came up with[…..]

Robert Heinecken at Cherry & Martin

Robert Heinecken, Misc...Newswoman (Blue), 1984; Dye bleach print videograms, plexiglas frame; 1 of 5-part; 11 x 14 inches each, 27.94 x 35.56 cm each. Courtesy of Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.

Robert Heinecken is an artist who is hard to pin down. A photographer who rarely used a camera, he founded UCLA’s photography department in 1964. Skeptical of the documentarian role of photography, he mined images from mass media, prefiguring the appropriation strategies of Pictures Generation artists like Richard Prince and Sherrie Levine by at least a decade. Despite this, he was never able to achieve[…..]