Posts Tagged ‘Altman Siegel Gallery’

Chris Johanson: Equations at Altman Siegel

Given the cartoonlike basis of most of his portrayals, the slackerly compositions, and the seeming arbitrariness of the surface textures of the paint he uses so dynamically as a set of color choices (seemingly clumsy elements that have often been similarly deployed by other artists who might pass as “outsider,” however relative that term might be), the question arises as to why Johanson chooses to so often paint rather than draw. In these pieces Johanson doubles down on painting in several ways: first, through the large scale of several of the scenes, as with Lecture Series/Abstract Mass, and the bleak consumer composite suburbia of Los Angeles with Pills. Johanson paints on repurposed wood panels and displays most of his work in awkward, large, built wooden armatures to show off both fronts and backs equally (as he has done even more elaborately in installations elsewhere). This prominently shows off the wooden buttressing behind the panels, which he also highlights with “secondary” paintings on the reverse. These include what look like a series of painted geometric doodles mosaic’d on the back of one larger composition, a simple set of color fields of darker and lighter brown parceled out by the different wood elements themselves, and what looks like a beginning painted sketch of an abstract landscape not so dissimilar to what might show up elsewhere as just one among many background components in a “primary” or finished painting by Johanson on the front of one of his panels.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Brian Karl’s review of Equations at Altman Siegel Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “Johanson eschews in this set of paintings the strategy of inserting text directly into the worlds he creates. The titles of the pieces do some of that work.” This article was originally published on November 30, 2015. In this exhibition of ten new works (all[…..]

Trevor Paglen at Altman Siegel Gallery

Trevor Paglen. Circles, 2015 (video still); video; 12:00. Courtesy of the Artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Trevor Paglen’s current exhibition at Altman Siegel Gallery in San Francisco. Author John Zarobell writes, “[The work] represents both a bit of art-historical posturing and an active response to government surveillance that allows viewers to imagine an alternative to our current condition. Perhaps a gallery is as good a place as any to[…..]

Sara VanDerBeek: Ancient Objects, Still Lives at Altman Siegel Gallery

Sara VanDerBeek. Chorerra, 2014; Digital c-print, 24 x 18 1/4 in; Edition of 6 plus 2 AP. Image courtesy of the Artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Danica Willard Sachs’ assessment of Sara VanDerBeek’s solo show Ancient Objects, Still Lives at Altman Siegel Gallery in San Francisco. Willard Sachs notes that the work “…suggest[s] that the past and present are not so easily partitioned when placed under VanDerBeek’s careful aesthetic watch.” This article was originally published on July 21, 2014. Sara VanDerBeek’s photographs in her latest exhibition Ancient Objects, Still[…..]

New Year’s Day Swimmers

The first time I saw New Year’s Day Swimmers, the current exhibition at Altman Siegel Gallery in San Francisco, I didn’t mean to. I intended to pop into the gallery to drop something off, but as soon as I crossed the threshold I was completely captivated by the works and forgot everything else I was supposed to accomplish by my visit. Floating through the gallery,[…..]

Seeing is Believing: An Interview with Trevor Paglen

Recent advancements in technology such as Google Earth and street-view, has given anyone with a computer and an internet connection the ability to collapse time and space. It is easy to sit in the comfort of your home and within just a few seconds, virtually place yourself anywhere in the world, that Google has imaged. This uniquely 21st century way of seeing may be relatively[…..]

Stay Home: Will Rogan at Altman Siegel Gallery

In 1980, French theorist and critic Roland Barthes published the book Camera Lucida, addressing the nature of photography and its inherent relationship with the mechanics of time. Barthes deconstructs this correlation and the concept of memento mori, roughly translated to mean “remember your mortality,” and how photography exposes the vulnerable temporality of life. Will Rogan’s exhibition, Stay Home, now at the Altman Siegel Gallery in[…..]

They Knew What They Wanted

This year, there has been a laundry list of artist curated group shows, from David Salle’s exhibition, Your History is not our History, at Haunch of Venison, to Jeff Koon’s Skin Fruit at the New Museum and the upcoming Walead Beshty curated show, Picture Industry (Goodbye to All That), at Regen Projects. Each exhibition has its hits and misses in terms of content, style and[…..]