Posts Tagged ‘Anuradha Vikram’

Mixed Messages.4 at Antenna Gallery

Jave Yoshimoto. Bear My Shame, 2010; Gouache on Paper; 14" x 17". Courtesy of Antenna Gallery and the Artist. Photo: Jerald White.

Just over forty-seven years ago this month, it was illegal for interracial couples to marry in sixteen states throughout the United States. Richard and Mildred Loving, the serendipitously named couple, were married in 1958 and then promptly arrested under anti-miscegenation laws. The legacy of Loving v. Virginia, the landmark decision of the Supreme Court to strike down race-based restrictions on marriage, reverberates clearly on the[.....]

Best of 2013 – #Hashtags: The State of Art: Bangladesh, Portugal, Greece, and Palestine at the Venice Biennale

Continuing our Best of 2013 series, today’s pick comes from co-founder and former managing editor Julie Henson, who explains her choice: “The Venice Biennale is the Olympics of the art world. An event of this scale always manages to reflect the state of the artworld in both intended and accidental ways — drawing parallels between complex relationships such as nationality and race, or economics and globalization. That’s[.....]

Best of 2013 – #Hashtags: On the Political in Art

As we continue our Best of 2013 series, today’s pick comes from Bean Gilsdorf, who writes, “As the managing editor of Daily Serving, I get to work with over thirty super-talented authors from around the world, so it’s very hard for me to select just one article for this series. However, I really appreciate the energy that Anuradha Vikram has brought to writing and editing our[.....]

Best of 2013 – Camille Henrot: Cities of Ys at the New Orleans Museum of Art

Continuing our Best of 2013 series, Anuradha Vikram writes, “Camille Henrot’s work is global in the best sense of the word. Mining source material from around the world, she creates works that draw out commonalities between Enlightenment cultures and the cultures that they have historically Othered. She uses technology as is logical for an artist of her generation-yet the subjects she explores are ancient as[.....]