Posts Tagged ‘Anuradha Vikram’

Best of 2015 – #Hashtags: The Business End of Art

Occupy London Stock Exchange. Capitalism is in Crisis. 2013.

For today’s installment of our Best of 2015 series, we have a selection from regular contributor Amelia Rina, who writes: “Money is a decidedly taboo topic in conversations about creative production. Artists, writers, musicians, and all creative people are either expected to be disinterested in the monetary value of their work, or be accused of ‘selling out.’ This devaluation impulse must change if we hope[…..]

Best of 2015 – #Hashtags: The Political Biennale

GLUKLYA/ Natalia Pershina-Yakimanskaya. Clothes for the demonstration against false election of Vladimir Putin, 2011-2015. 56th International Art Exhibition - la Biennale di Venezia, All the World’s Futures. Photo by Alessandra Chemollo. Courtesy: la Biennale di Venezia.

Continuing our Best of 2015 series, regular contributor Jordan Amirkhani writes,“I am always eager to clear a few minutes out of my day to read a new article or post by Anuradha Vikram. I am continually inspired by the style and substance of her writing, in particular, her commitment to confronting the political (or the lack of it) in each article she writes. Vikram’s breakdown of the[…..]

Best of 2014 – #Hashtags: Mimics and Minstrels

Sturtevant. Warhol Black Marilyn. 2004. Synthetic polymer silkscreen and acrylic on canvas. 15 ¾ x 13 ¾ in. (40 x 35 cm). Ringier Collection, courtesy Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London.  © Sturtevant.

Continuing our Best of 2014 series, regular contributor Tori Bush writes, “Anuradha Vikram’s essay reflects on how American institutions, both in the art world and the real world, have myopic—if not completely blind—views on the state of bias and racism today. If institutions of knowledge and culture like the Whitney Biennial cannot be more equitable in their curatorial choices, what example can be set for other American institutions[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: Divide//Conquer: Artists Confront the Gentrification of Urban Space

Mail Order Brides/M.O.B. (Jenifer Wofford, Reanne Estrada, Eliza Barrios). Manananggoogle, 2013. Multimedia installation including website and photographs. Commissioned by the San Jose Museum of Art with support from The James Irvine Foundation and MetLife Foundation.

Today from the archives we bring you a look back at Anuradha Vikram’s assessment of gentrification, power, and artistic protest. She notes, “The great tragedy of gentrification—which its proponents appear not to recognize—is that groups that are displaced can never be reunited in another, more affordable location.” This article was originally published on October 21, 2013. #gentrification #displacement #race #class #technology #industry #neo-colonialism To understand[…..]

From the Archives – Curating Activism: An Interview with Julio César Morales

Julio César Morales, "Undocumented Interventions #1," 2011. Watercolor and ink on paper. 32.5 x 24.5 in.

Today from our archives we bring you an interview with Julio César Morales, curator of the Arizona State University Art Museum in Tempe. Morales says, “I am working to develop the largest Latin American video archive in the U.S., housed in the city most threatening to Latinos in the U.S. This juxtaposition reflects the ongoing struggles between the U.S. and Mexico and their parasitic need[…..]

Mixed Messages.4 at Antenna Gallery

Jave Yoshimoto. Bear My Shame, 2010; Gouache on Paper; 14" x 17". Courtesy of Antenna Gallery and the Artist. Photo: Jerald White.

Just over forty-seven years ago this month, it was illegal for interracial couples to marry in sixteen states throughout the United States. Richard and Mildred Loving, the serendipitously named couple, were married in 1958 and then promptly arrested under anti-miscegenation laws. The legacy of Loving v. Virginia, the landmark decision of the Supreme Court to strike down race-based restrictions on marriage, reverberates clearly on the[…..]

Best of 2013 – #Hashtags: The State of Art: Bangladesh, Portugal, Greece, and Palestine at the Venice Biennale

Continuing our Best of 2013 series, today’s pick comes from co-founder and former managing editor Julie Henson, who explains her choice: “The Venice Biennale is the Olympics of the art world. An event of this scale always manages to reflect the state of the artworld in both intended and accidental ways — drawing parallels between complex relationships such as nationality and race, or economics and globalization. That’s[…..]