Posts Tagged ‘appropriation’

Summer Reading: Bajagic vs Novitskova

Screen grab by Darja Bajagic, posted September 2011 to Tumblr.

As the editors of Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: Mimics and Minstrels

Sturtevant. Warhol Black Marilyn. 2004. Synthetic polymer silkscreen and acrylic on canvas. 15 ¾ x 13 ¾ in. (40 x 35 cm). Ringier Collection, courtesy Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London.  © Sturtevant.

Since July 2013, Daily Serving’s #Hashtags column has been written by Anuradha Vikram, Director of the Residency Programs at the 18th Street Arts Center in Los Angeles. For the past year, Vikram has eloquently and intelligently voiced arguments about—among other topics—institutionalized racism, representations of marginalized identities, and economic inequality, all the while offering nuanced critiques of the artworks that take up these subjects. (For example, see her incisive review of LaToya Ruby Frazier’s[…..]

Fan Mail: Geoffry Smalley

Geoffry Smalley. Early Morning at Cold Spring, Across Home Run Cove, 2014; acrylic on book page; 12 x 9 inches. Courtesy the artist.

Geoffry Smalley’s work is rooted in early-19th-century American painting, deriving specific scenes and techniques from historical canvases and the Hudson River School. In 1836, painter Thomas Cole completed his five-part series The Course of Empire. The series documents Cole’s vision for the birth, life, and death of western civilization, from the pastoral to the desolate. Cole had a calculated optimism for life and renewal, but[…..]

#Hashtags: Mimics and Minstrels

#access #discrimination #appropriation #institutions #representation #re-performance Two important events transpired in the art world last week that have brought the complications of diversity and hierarchy into sharp focus. The first is the passing of artist Elaine Sturtevant, an artist who sublimated a critique of gendered inequity among artist peers into works that appropriated and re-created works deemed significant to the canon of contemporary art. The other[…..]

#Hashtags: The Importer/Exporter

Jeffrey Augustine Songco. Blissed Out, 2013. HD looping video. © Jeffrey Augustine Songco. Courtesy of the artist and Steven Wolf Fine Arts, San Francisco.

#commerce #spirituality #appropriation #commodification #orientalism The third and final installment of the Asian Art Museum’s Proximities series of contemporary art exhibitions addresses Asia’s central role in networks of trade, manufacturing, and information. On the whole, this series’ focus on looking at Asia through an American lens has revealed significantly more about America and the Bay Area than about Asia. As with the first and second[…..]

John Sparagana: Crowds & Powder at Corbett vs. Dempsey

John Sparagana. Crowds & Power: The Revolutionaries, 2013; archival inkjet prints with oil stick, sliced and mixed, on paper; 58 x 92 in. Courtesy of the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago. Photo: Tom Van Eynde.

John Sparagana fatigues images by manipulating them. First he scans pictures and runs off inkjet prints, then he crumples the pictures in his pocket and kneads the glossy paper for days or weeks until the sheet’s fibrous structure is loosened. The result is a soft fabric more than double in size, with its original image lightened and diminished on the new surface, appearing like a[…..]

Best of 2013 – Robert Heinecken at Cherry & Martin

For today’s installment of our Best of 2013 series, we have a selection from co-founder Seth Curcio, who writes, “Robert Heinecken has always lived near the top of my favorites list. So, reading this lovely review of his recent project in LA was a nice little surprise. It gave me the opportunity to reflect on how Heinecken’s work operates in today’s context—shedding light on how[…..]