Posts Tagged ‘appropriation’

Adam Pendleton: Becoming Imperceptible at Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans

Adam Pendleton. Installation Shot of System of Display, X (EXPRESS/Poro secret society mask, Mano, Liberia). 2016. Silkscreen ink on Plexiglas and mirror. Image courtesy of the artist and the Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans.

Curated by Dr. Andrea Andersson, Adam Pendleton: Becoming Imperceptible is the most extensive museum presentation of the artist’s work to date—a significant triumph for a cultural institution located in New Orleans, one of the most racially and politically fraught cities in the southern United States. While the exhibition’s rich display resonates with the variety of material and conceptual strategies at work in Pendleton’s oeuvre, it[…..]

Locating Technology: Raiders and Empires

Stephanie Syjuco. RAIDERS: International Booty, Bountiful Harvest (Selections from the Collection of the A____ A__ M_____) (installation view), 2011; digital archival photo prints mounted onto laser-cut wood, hardware, crates; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Catharine Clark, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Genevieve Quick’s most recent “Locating Technology” column, a consideration of artist Stephanie Syjuco’s process and practice: “[Syjuco] prompts viewers to consider more broadly the legality and ethics of museums’ collections, and suggests that museums are institutions of cultural appropriation.” This article was originally published on October 27, 2015. Much of the history of museum collections is related to[…..]

Summer Reading – It’s Not Stealing If It’s Art: A Re-Primer on Image Appropriation for the Internet Generation

Left, Arabelle Sicardi and Tayler Smith's original photograph, "Hari Nef," 2014. Right, Zak Arctander's appropriation, "Cheeks," 2015.

From our friends at MOMUS, today we bring you “It’s Not Stealing If It’s Art: A Re-Primer On Image Appropriation for the Internet Generation.” This funny, provocative essay by RM Vaughan considers recent skirmishes that involve images created or reused by the Suicide Girls, Richard Prince, Arabelle Sicardi and Tayler Smith, and Zak Arctander. Vaughan delineates his position with the question: “Here is where I must ask, what don’t visual[…..]

#Hashtags: Conceptualizing Difference

Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974-1989. 
Installation view at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. February 8-May 24, 2015. Photography by Brian Forrest.

#institutions #race #conceptualism #access #appropriation A recent performance at Brown University by conceptual poet Kenneth Goldsmith has resurrected what had seemed to be a long-ago-settled debate. Goldsmith, whose poetic practice is based on appropriation, presented an adaptation of the autopsy report of Ferguson, Missouri, police shooting victim Michael Brown as a poetic reading during the Interrupt 3 arts festival in mid-March. The subsequent commentary has largely taken Goldsmith to task for what many perceive to have[…..]

#Hashtags: Political Abstraction – The Revolution is Us


In a 2012 essay for e-flux, After OWS: Social Practice Art, Abstraction, and the Limits of the Social, Gregory Sholette asks whether there can be a role for abstraction within the flourishing new discipline of socially engaged post-conceptual art practice. This remains a valid question given that most activist art is still understood to be representational, based on precedents from the Civil Rights era such as[…..]

Summer Reading: Bajagic vs Novitskova

Screen grab by Darja Bajagic, posted September 2011 to Tumblr.

As the editors of Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: Mimics and Minstrels

Sturtevant. Warhol Black Marilyn. 2004. Synthetic polymer silkscreen and acrylic on canvas. 15 ¾ x 13 ¾ in. (40 x 35 cm). Ringier Collection, courtesy Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London.  © Sturtevant.

Since July 2013, Daily Serving’s #Hashtags column has been written by Anuradha Vikram, Director of the Residency Programs at the 18th Street Arts Center in Los Angeles. For the past year, Vikram has eloquently and intelligently voiced arguments about—among other topics—institutionalized racism, representations of marginalized identities, and economic inequality, all the while offering nuanced critiques of the artworks that take up these subjects. (For example, see her incisive review of LaToya Ruby Frazier’s[…..]