Posts Tagged ‘appropriation’

Best of 2013 – Robert Heinecken at Cherry & Martin

For today’s installment of our Best of 2013 series, we have a selection from co-founder Seth Curcio, who writes, “Robert Heinecken has always lived near the top of my favorites list. So, reading this lovely review of his recent project in LA was a nice little surprise. It gave me the opportunity to reflect on how Heinecken’s work operates in today’s context—shedding light on how[…..]

Robert Heinecken at Cherry & Martin

Robert Heinecken, Misc...Newswoman (Blue), 1984; Dye bleach print videograms, plexiglas frame; 1 of 5-part; 11 x 14 inches each, 27.94 x 35.56 cm each. Courtesy of Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.

Robert Heinecken is an artist who is hard to pin down. A photographer who rarely used a camera, he founded UCLA’s photography department in 1964. Skeptical of the documentarian role of photography, he mined images from mass media, prefiguring the appropriation strategies of Pictures Generation artists like Richard Prince and Sherrie Levine by at least a decade. Despite this, he was never able to achieve[…..]

Victoria Fu: Belle Captive at Emerson Dorsch

In a time when appropriation has become seamlessly integrated into contemporary art practice, it’s not easy to provide a precise definition for such an increasingly amorphous concept. Jan Verwoert offers a robust description, calling appropriation “an intense sense of an interruption of temporal continuity, a black out of historical time that mortifies culture and turns its tropes into inanimate figures, into a objectified, commodified visual[…..]

Sturtevant: Leaps Jumps and Bumps at Serpentine Gallery

Sturtevant. Sex Dolls, 2011; installation view, Sturtevant: Leaps Jumps and Bumps, 2013; Courtesy Serpentine Gallery, London. Photo: Jerry Hardman-Jones

It’s nearly impossible to talk about a show of Sturtevant’s work and have it understood. Like a book, you have to start at the beginning. The key to Sturtevant is context. In 1964’s New York City, Elaine Sturtevant sent shock waves through the art world when she started making replicas of the work of her contemporaries. For this, she received a tremendous amount of crap. The[…..]

Speaking Directly: Interview with Tony Discenza

Tony Discenza, TRANSPORTED, 2010.  Vinyl on aluminum, 30 x 24 inches

Tony Discenza’s text-based work is concise yet absurd: the tone is often matter-of-fact while the content is speculative and fanciful. The appropriated formats of a street sign or a book’s teaser page provide an internal logic that holds the tension of this paradox quite neatly. Obviously, I’m a fan, so I asked him to chat with me about his recent projects. Discenza’s solo and collaborative[…..]

Help Desk: “Recreativity”

Candice Breitz, Becoming J Lo, 2003. Video installation

Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, patrons, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. Help Desk is cosponsored by KQED.org. Note: if you’ve been following the conversation on writing negative reviews, Will Brand has an interesting take over at the L Magazine. Pardon the interruption of our regular[…..]

Help Desk: Appropriation and Appropriateness

Nina Katchadourian, Lavatory Self-Portrait in the Flemish Style #18-19, 2011. C-print, edition of 8, diptych: 7.157 x 6 inches each

Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, patrons, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. Help Desk is cosponsored by KQED.org. If you were intrigued by last week’s Q&A regarding negative reviews, check out this well-argued example on Art Practical. I’ve been noticing recently that there is a lot[…..]