Posts Tagged ‘Art Practical’

Portraits and Other Likenesses from SFMOMA at the Museum of the African Diaspora

Mickalene Thomas. Sista Sista Lady Blue, 2007; chromogenic print; 40 3/8 x 48 1/2 in. Collection of SFMOMA; gift of Campari USA. © Mickalene Thomas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Katherine Du Tiel.

“…In reimagining traditions of portraiture, the artists featured not only reinsert black subjects into the pictorial frame, they also redefine these creative traditions as inherently mutable and, as such, capable of representing complex subjectivities that exist beyond the boundaries of race, gender, sexuality, and class.” From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Anton Stuebner’s review of Portraits and Other Likenesses from SFMOMA. This article was[…..]

28 Chinese at the Asian Art Museum

Zhang Huan. To Raise the Water Level in a Fishpond, 1997; chromogenic print on Fuji archival paper; 40 ¾ in x 60 ½ in. Courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection, Miami. © Zhang Huan.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of 28 Chinese at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Author Jing Cao notes: “The best works in 28 Chinese take as their subject [a] tension between material conditions and ideological constructs—between things and meanings—to offer new ways of observing the contemporary condition.” This article was originally published on June 25, 2015. 28 Chinese at the Asian[…..]

Print Public at Kala Art Institute and Gallery

Susan O’Malley. Less Internet More Love, from the series Advice From My 80-Year-Old Self, 2015; mural at Bob McGee's Machining Co., Inc., 2735 San Pablo Ave, Berkeley. Courtesy of Kala Art Institute. Photo: Bob McGee’s Machining Co., Inc.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you John Zarobell’s review of Print Public at Kala Art Institute and Gallery in Berkeley, California. The author notes, “[the exhibition] augurs not merely new developments in the neighborhood, but novel and innovative approaches to print.” This article was originally published on June 18, 2015. The medium of print has a long history of expanding art into the[…..]

What Matters to Us?: A Reenactment of Anna Halprin’s Blank Placard Dance

What Matters to Us?: A Reenactment of Anna Halprin’s Blank Placard Dance, Saturday, May 16, 2015, San Francisco. Photo: Emily Holmes.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of What Matters to Us?, performed in San Francisco on May 16, 2015. Of her participation in the event, author Vanessa Kauffman notes, “The act of protest alone had absolved us of nothing. What matters to us is still out there, waiting.” This article was originally published on June 11, 2015.  Emerging one by one from the[…..]

How to Read with Other People

Contemporary Art Magazines Critical Reading Group meeting, April 27, 2015. Courtesy of Triangle, New York. Photo: Elena Levi.

Today from our partner site Art Practical, we bring you an excerpt of Orit Gat’s essay on the art-magazine reading group she co-founded. The members of the group meet each month to evaluate every part of a single magazine, from cover to cover; Gat notes: “art magazines play a role in the way we all assess our place and opinions in regard to the art world.” This article was originally[…..]

Dying of Exposure

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you an essay from their new issue, “Free Speech in the Art World.” Author Aruna D’Souza discusses “the challenge of being a writer in an age when we are all content providers, the difficulty of separating one kind of free labor from another kind, of weighing one type of exposure against another, of what we are willing to offer[…..]

Jacob Lawrence: Promised Land at the Cantor Arts Center

Jacob Lawrence. Ordeal of Alice, 1963; egg tempera on hardboard; 24 x 20 in. Gift of Dr. Herbert J. Kayden and Family in memory of Dr. Gabrielle H. Reem, 2013.98. © 2015 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy of the Cantor Arts Center, Palo Alto.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Lea Feinstein’s review of Jacob Lawrence: Promised Land at the Cantor Arts Center of Stanford University. Feinstein notes: “In drawing inspiration from iconic works of art history, Lawrence indicated that the stories he painted were part of the larger human context, not just specific to the African American experience.” This article was originally published on May 26, 2015.[…..]