Posts Tagged ‘Art Practical’

Transformations – Death, Breakage, and the Unexpected

David Ireland. Angel-Go-Round, 1996; fiberglass, cast concrete figures and motor; 180 x 191 x 191 in. Courtesy of di Rosa collection, Napa. Photo: Israel Valencia.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a recent installment of “Notes from di Rosa,” a column produced in conjunction with Art Practical’s yearlong residency at the museum. In this edition, author Terri Cohn explores the collection and its legacy. This article was originally published on October 8, 2014. Beautiful, bucolic, and quiet, di Rosa stretches out over its 200 acres with obvious and[…..]

Sarah Oppenheimer at Mills College Art Museum

Sarah Oppenheimer, 2014; installation view, Mills College Art Museum. Courtesy of the Artist and Mills College Art Museum.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Lea Feinstein’s review of Sarah Oppenheimer’s current solo show at Mills College Art Museum. Feinstein notes: “[Oppenheimer] creates immersive experiences for participants, in which literal reflections inspire personal reflection and wondering is a product of wandering. […] But without hours of serious research before seeing the exhibition, it is difficult to parse the scope or significance of her installations from[…..]

Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art

Jean-Michel Basquiat. Charles the First, 1982; acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas; three panels, 78 x 65 in. Courtesy of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, New York © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an assessment of Jordana Moore Saggese’s new monograph, Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art. Of Basquiat’s work, reviewer Anton Stuebner notes: “[the] canvases require viewers to […] recognize that the boundaries of pictorial representation, like language, can be redefined and reformed.” This article was originally published on October 7, 2014. The mythology around Jean-Michel Basquiat continues to proliferate in[…..]

#Hashtags – Locating Techonology: Therapeutic Bodies

Shana Moulton and Nick Hallett, featuring Daisy Press. Whispering Pines 10, 2012; performance at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Courtesy of the Artist and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Genevieve Quick’s consideration of performances by Mika Rottenberg and Shana Moulton. The author notes: “As early media artists and feminists have done, Rottenberg and Moulton construct imaginative narratives that probe the unsettling relationship between the body, screens, technology, and contemporary life.” This article was originally published on October 15, 2014. Mika Rottenberg’s and Shana Moulton’s absurdist[…..]

Jessamyn Lovell: Dear Erin Hart at SF Camerawork

Jessamyn Lovell. Following 6 (Fence), 2014; digital print on vinyl; 96 x 133 in. Courtesy of the Artist and SF Camerawork, San Francisco.

From our sister publication Art Practical, today we bring you a review of artist Jessamyn Lovell’s surveillance photography—artwork that has an incredible backstory. Author Genevieve Quick notes, “By leaving the project open-ended, Lovell smartly expands the work beyond revenge and allows viewers to consider its complexities through their own moral codes.” This article was originally published on September 25, 2014.   In Jessamyn Lovell’s exhibition Dear Erin[…..]

Misako Inaoka: Fractured Fauna at Johansson Projects

Misako Inaoka. Bird Man, 2014; mixed media; 19 x 20 x 10 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Johansson Projects, Oakland.

Our partners at Art Practical are celebrating their sixth annual Shotgun! issue, so today we bring you Monica Westin’s review of Misako Inaoka: Fractured Fauna at Johansson Projects. This article was originally published on September 25, 2014. Misako Inaoka’s menagerie of upholstered animal sculptures, exquisite quasi-taxidermy, and delicate collage works is immediately alluring. It only becomes clear after spending time with the objects that their beguiling quality critiques our own desires for[…..]

Cynthia Ona Innis: Shift at Traywick Contemporary

Cynthia Ona Innis.
 Shift, 2014; acrylic and satin on canvas; 
45 x 50 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Traywick Contemporary, Berkeley.

Our partners at Art Practical are celebrating their sixth annual Shotgun! issue, so today we bring you Maria Porges’ review of Cynthia Ona Innis: Shift at Traywick Contemporary in Berkeley, California. This article was originally published on September 25, 2014. Rather than being representations of place, Cynthia Ona Innis’ paintings are evocations of the experience of landscape. Innis favors locations where change is visible and constant—like Iceland, where she visited a year[…..]