Posts Tagged ‘Art Practical’

Metahaven: The Sprawl at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Metahaven. The Sprawl (still), 2015. Co-produced by Lighthouse and commissioned by Lighthouse and the Space.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Anton Stuebner’s review of Metahaven: The Sprawl at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. The author notes, “[…] Metahaven poetically suggests that trauma’s real origins aren’t found in the images on screen—they’re located within ourselves and in our inherent capacity for perpetuating violence in the world around us.” This article was originally published on February 2, 2016. A[…..]

UNEARTHED: Found + Made at Oakland Museum of California

Installation view, UNEARTHED: Found + Made, 2015-2016. Courtesy of the Oakland Museum of California. Photo: Johnna Arnold.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Vivian Sming’s review of UNEARTHED: Found + Made at Oakland Museum of California. The author notes, “[The] democratic approach of placing contemporary art and local clubs side by side compresses and erases hierarchies, providing a slice of history, place, and time.” This article was originally published on January 26, 2016. In the late 19th century, anthropologist Franz Boas[…..]

Locating Technology: Raiders and Empires

Stephanie Syjuco. RAIDERS: International Booty, Bountiful Harvest (Selections from the Collection of the A____ A__ M_____) (installation view), 2011; digital archival photo prints mounted onto laser-cut wood, hardware, crates; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Catharine Clark, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Genevieve Quick’s most recent “Locating Technology” column, a consideration of artist Stephanie Syjuco’s process and practice: “[Syjuco] prompts viewers to consider more broadly the legality and ethics of museums’ collections, and suggests that museums are institutions of cultural appropriation.” This article was originally published on October 27, 2015. Much of the history of museum collections is related to[…..]

Chris Johanson: Equations at Altman Siegel

Given the cartoonlike basis of most of his portrayals, the slackerly compositions, and the seeming arbitrariness of the surface textures of the paint he uses so dynamically as a set of color choices (seemingly clumsy elements that have often been similarly deployed by other artists who might pass as “outsider,” however relative that term might be), the question arises as to why Johanson chooses to so often paint rather than draw. In these pieces Johanson doubles down on painting in several ways: first, through the large scale of several of the scenes, as with Lecture Series/Abstract Mass, and the bleak consumer composite suburbia of Los Angeles with Pills. Johanson paints on repurposed wood panels and displays most of his work in awkward, large, built wooden armatures to show off both fronts and backs equally (as he has done even more elaborately in installations elsewhere). This prominently shows off the wooden buttressing behind the panels, which he also highlights with “secondary” paintings on the reverse. These include what look like a series of painted geometric doodles mosaic’d on the back of one larger composition, a simple set of color fields of darker and lighter brown parceled out by the different wood elements themselves, and what looks like a beginning painted sketch of an abstract landscape not so dissimilar to what might show up elsewhere as just one among many background components in a “primary” or finished painting by Johanson on the front of one of his panels.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Brian Karl’s review of Equations at Altman Siegel Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “Johanson eschews in this set of paintings the strategy of inserting text directly into the worlds he creates. The titles of the pieces do some of that work.” This article was originally published on November 30, 2015. In this exhibition of ten new works (all[…..]

Julian Hoeber: The Inward Turn at Jessica Silverman Gallery

Julian Hoeber. The Inward Turn; installation view. Courtesy of the Artist and Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco.

In this closed, infinite system, there is more to ponder than the paradoxical experience of such a visual journey.

In the Dressing Room with Coco Fusco, August 19, 2015

Coco Fusco. Observations of Predation in Humans: A Lecture by Dr. Zira, Animal Psychologist, 2013 (still); performance. Courtesy of Walker Art Center. Photo: Gene Pittman.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you In the Dressing Room with Coco Fusco by Patricia Maloney and Moira Roth. In it, Coco Fusco takes us behind the scenes of her performance as Dr. Zira, the animal psychologist from Planet of the Apes, at Yerba Buena’s Radical Presence exhibition. As she removes her monkey costume backstage, Fusco opens up about performance and uniforms, economic violence, and[…..]

Paul Graham: The Whiteness of the Whale

Paul Graham. New Orleans (Cherries), 2005. Courtesy of the Artist and Pier 24 Photography, San Francisco.

By further playing up these perspectives through the massive scale of the photographs, Graham leaves a viewer feeling uncomfortable about accepting these imposing yet generic visualizations of economic standing.