Posts Tagged ‘Art Practical’

Summer Session – Reskill Now!

Suzanne Lacy. Still from the making of The Roof Is on Fire, 1992–94. To make this work, a collaborative performance directed by Lacy and documented in photos, videos, and a film, 220 inner-city teens in 100 cars came together on the garage roof of Oakland’s Federal Building to talk openly, with predetermined topics but no script, in front of “eavesdropping” audiences and cameras.

Today’s installment of our Summer Session considering labor comes from our sister publication Art Practical. Author Celeste Connor contributes an Op-Ed that claims, “To fetishize style trends, as institutions do, as singular models for development of cultural ideas and actions is tragicomically flattening. If we makers are serious about the goal of a growing, inclusive public, reskilling is a crucial antidote.” This article was originally published on June[…..]

Summer Session – Appropriate Technologies

The Thing Quarterly, John Baldessari edition. Courtesy of The Thing Quarterly. Photo: Michael O'Neal.

From our sister publication Art Practical, today we bring you the next installment of our Summer Session—and this month, we’re considering the idea of labor. Author Abigail Satinsky assesses systems “in which working artists and arts organizations are empowered to devise their own structures for sustainability.” This article was originally published on April 3, 2014. Artists and other creative people who organize their lives around the arts have long[…..]

Summer Session – Inside the Artist’s Studio, Part 5: Dee Hibbert-Jones and Nomi Talisman

Dee Hibbert-Jones (left) and Nomi Talisman in their studio. Photo: Michele Carlson.

Today’s essay, written by our new executive director Michele Carlson for our sister publication Art Practical, summarizes Dee Hibbert-Jones and Nomi Talisman’s labor collaborating on Living Condition, a project that “synthesizes hours of interviews, footage, and research” to explore crime, public perception, and capital punishment. This article was originally published on June 26, 2014. Just off the hustle of 24th Street in San Francisco’s Mission district, multimedia[…..]

Summer Session: On Laboring for Love

Shannon Finnegan. 8 Hours of Work, 2012 (performance still); Saturday, June 9, 2012, 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Presented by Recession Art in conjunction with Everything Is Index, Nothing Is History at the Invisible Dog, Brooklyn. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you the next installment of our Summer Session—for June we’re considering the idea of labor. In this essay, author Elyse Mallouk (also an artist) notes, “While artists struggle publicly to make the value of art work visible, they are bound as a corporate body by the uncertainties and sacrifices they share in common… Artists can gain power[…..]

Take This Hammer: Art + Media Activism from the Bay Area at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Take This Hammer: Art + Media Activism from the Bay Area, installation view, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Left: Oree Originol. Justice for Our Lives, 2014-ongoing. Right: Cat Brooks with Black Lives Matter. Anti Police-Terror Project, ‘Tasha,’ 2015. Courtesy of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. Photo: Charlie Villyard.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you editor Emily Holmes’ review of Take This Hammer at YBCA in San Francisco. Holmes notes, “Although there is crossover between works, particularly in regard to the social issues they address, violence is perhaps the single thread running through all of Take This Hammer. […] It takes many forms, but the exhibition particularly exposes systemic inequities and state-sanctioned[…..]

Virtual Absence and Presence in the Museum of Stolen Art

Ziv Schneider. Art Detective: The Museum of Stolen Art, 2015; Android VR app. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you the most recent edition of their popular “Locating Technology” column, a consideration of the Museum of Stolen Art (MOSA). Author Genevieve Quick notes that “MOSA capitalizes on the unknown: the whereabouts of the artworks, sometimes the conditions of their theft or looting. Rather than explaining the significance of given artworks as conventional museums do, MOSA poses questions about their[…..]

Question Bridge: Black Males in America

Question Bridge: Black Males in America (Aperture/Campaign for Black Male Achievement, 2015)

Today we bring you an excerpt from Art Practical’s Printed Matters column. Roula Seikaly reviews Question Bridge: Black Males in America, the published companion to a project, platform, and installation that regards identity and representation. Seikaly notes, “Asking a question […] can be difficult; it can imply lack of knowledge and experience, rendering the asker vulnerable. No one wants to be caught out, least of all when the questions address identity, community, and most urgently,[…..]