Posts Tagged ‘Art Practical’

Summer Reading – Finding Value in a Flattened Field

Anna Gray + Ryan Wilson Paulsen. 100 Posterworks, 2009–2013; printed poster; 11 x 17 in. Courtesy of the Artists.

Today for our Summer Reading series we bring you Patricia Maloney’s recent op-ed from our partners at Art Practical. The author notes, “The commitment to paying contributors must be acknowledged as only the most visible link in a long chain of interlocking, concrete exchanges distributed throughout the ecosystem. Paying a writer or artist is not a unidirectional transaction; it is part of a public health policy.” This[…..]

Summer Reading – (Un)doing (Un)compensation

Caroline Woolard. ourgoods.org cards, 2010. Courtesy of the Artist.

In selecting the articles for our Summer Reading series—ones that we think exemplify current issues in the field of contemporary art—we would be remiss if we did not include Caroline Woolard’s consideration of “[the] seven ways in which I attempt to navigate inequity within institutions and collective projects.” This article was originally published in Art Practical’s special issue “Valuing Labor in the Arts” on April 3, 2014.[…..]

The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter at Fraenkel Gallery

Bryson Rand, Mario & Danny (Los Angeles), 2015; Pigment print, edition of 5, 42 x 30 in. Courtesy of the artist and Fraenkel Gallery.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Petra Bibeau’s review of The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter at Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “[the exhibition]succeeds due to the selected artists’ compulsive desire to create their own narration from a point of obsession with being rather than from a literal rendition of living.” This article was originally published on August 12, 2015. In[…..]

Tapping the Mirror at Royal NoneSuch Gallery

Brynda Glazier and Courtney Johnson. Tapping the Mirror, 2015. Installation view. Courtesy of the artists and Royal Nonesuch Gallery, Oakland. Photo Courtney Johnson

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Sarah Burke’s review of Tapping the Mirror at Royal NoneSuch Gallery in Oakland, California. The author notes, “As the fragments [of the video] continuously flicker into each other, [it] becomes less about the worlds imagined, and more about the modes by which we collectively imagine them.” This article was originally published on August 6, 2015. The curatorial statement for[…..]

Walter Robinson: Home Grown at the Palo Alto Art Center

Walter Robinson. Spin, 2008; wood, epoxy, steel, and metal flake; 52 x 26 x 22 in. Collection of Donald Kushner. Courtesy of the Palo Alto Art Center.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Walter Robinson: Home Grown at the Palo Alto Art Center. Author Maria Porges notes: “The cumulative effect here is one of nostalgia—sometimes for things that never really existed—mixed with a strange kind of déjà vu. Not only have we been here before, but we will be here again, over and over, as we[…..]

Night Begins the Day: Rethinking Space, Time, and Beauty at the Contemporary Jewish Museum

Katie Paterson. The Dying Star Letters, 2010–present; ink on paper; dimensions variable; installation view, Mead Gallery, University of Warwick, 2013. Courtesy of the Artist and James Cohan Gallery, New York / Shanghai.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Vanessa Kauffman’s review of Night Begins the Day at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco. The author notes, “The many pieces in the exhibition […] do not mimic the sublimity of the universe in its raw state—a view that is impossible to achieve in a practical sense. Instead, these are revelations of the Earth and its ethers[…..]

Do It & Do It (Archive) at the Napa Valley Museum

Alison Knowles. Homage to Each Red Thing, 1996. Photo: Glen Helfand.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Glen Helfand‘s review of Do It & Do It (Archive), a survey of relational aesthetics now on view at the Napa Valley Museum. The author notes that this iteration of the exhibition “…seems a bit more community-minded, offering an entertaining and edifying entry to conceptualism for locals and adventurous, well-heeled visitors who have a little[…..]