Posts Tagged ‘Art Practical’

Happy Labor Day!

Ramiro Gomez. No Splash (after David
Hockney’s A Bigger
Splash, 1967), 2013.
Acrylic on canvas
96 x 96 inches.
Courtesy of the artist and Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Osceola Refetoff.

Today is Labor Day in the United States, a day “dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers.” In honor of the day, we present you with links for further reading: More than a dozen articles on labor, artistic services, precarity, working for free, and related subjects are included in Art Practical’s Issue 5.4: Valuing Labor in the Arts Labor Arts ”presents powerful images[…..]

Summer Session: How We Read: Close, Hyper, Machine—Part 1

Catherine Wagner. Beloved, Toni Morrison from the series trans/literate, 2011; archival pigment print with braille; edition of five; 21.75 in. x 49.13 in. diptych. Courtesy of the Artist and Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco.

As part of our Back to School Summer Session we are exploring pedagogy and the state of learning in the arts. Today we bring you an article from our sister publication Art Practical by cultural scholar and author of How We Became Posthuman N. Katherine Hayles. Considering national studies observing a decline in general reading abilities across the United States, Hayles differentiates between key reading techniques employed by print versus digital texts.[…..]

Summer Session – On Kawara: Pure Consciousness at 19 Kindergartens

Pure Consciousness booklet image of kindergarteners in Bethlehem, Palestine, with seven Kawara date paintings from the Today series in background, laid over other booklets. Image courtesy of Walter and McBean Galleries, San Francisco Art Institute.

This month, our Back to School session addresses topics ranging from self-directed learning to formal pedagogy to the intersections of art and academics. Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you a review by Jessica Brier of On Kawara’s project Pure Consciousness. Brier draws connections between the malleability of Kawara’s conceptualist exploration of time and how the placing of his works within kindergartens across the globe challenges the[…..]

Summer Session – Pissarro’s People

Apple Harvest, 1888; oil on canvas; 24 x 29.13 in. Courtesy of the Artist and the Dallas Museum of Art.

For this Summer Session we’re thinking about going Back to School, musing on art education, pedagogy, and learning. From our sister publication Art Practical we bring you John Zarobell’s review of the San Francisco Legion of Honor’s 2011 Camille Pissarro exhibition. Zarobell finds that the show reveals a radical politic of Impressionism that is often overlooked in the works of some of the more famous artists. The author demonstrates[…..]

Summer Session – Teach 4 Amerika

Teach 4 Amerika, 2011; poster. Courtesy of the Bruce High Quality Foundation and Creative Time, New York.

Our new Summer Session topic is Back to School, and today we bring you an article from our sister publication Art Practical. Here, Patricia Maloney reviews the Bruce High Quality Foundation’s tour Teach 4 Amerika, the collaborative’s 2011 performative critique of the art academy. Though BHQF foregrounds its significant arguments against the economic art-school model with a healthy dose of irony, Maloney finds that the most ironic aspect[…..]

Summer Session – @Large: Ai Weiwei at Alcatraz

Ai Wei Wei. With Wind, 2014; installation detail, New Industries Building, Alcatraz. Courtesy of FOR-SITE Foundation. Photo: Jan Stürmann.

Our current Summer Session topic is celebrity, and today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you a review by Heidi Rabben of artist Ai Wei Wei’s controversial show @Large. Rabben takes Ai’s position as an artist–activist–provocateur to task, suggesting that the show relies too heavily on his reputation without delivering the content to match. This review was originally published on November 24, 2014. This text is likely neither the first[…..]

Summer Session – Punk Thing

Still from the X-Ray Spex performing "Oh Bondage! Up Yours!" circa 1977. From the documentary Punk in London (Metrodome, 1977).

For this month’s Summer Session we’re thinking about celebrity, and today we bring you an article by Brandon Brown from our sister publication Art Practical on perhaps one of the most iconic and enduring cultural genres: punk. Simultaneously existing as both an infamously commercialized stylization and a sincere, perennial style, punk remains an inexhaustible testament to the inextricability of power and aesthetics. This article was originally published on September[…..]