Posts Tagged ‘Art Practical’

Valuing Labor in the Arts: Can We Talk About the Audience?

Introduction, Valuing Laboring in the Arts practicum, April 19, 2014, UC Berkeley Art Museum. Courtesy of the Arts Research Center, UC Berkeley. Photo: Joseph del Pesco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you an excerpt of author Michael O’Hare’s response after participating in the “Big Soft (BS) Contract” workshop. This workshop was part of  the practicum “Valuing Labor in the Arts” at the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley, a daylong series of artist-led workshops that explored questions of art, labor, and economics. O’Hare, who is a Professor of Public Policy at[.....]

Valuing Labor in the Arts: Reigniting Public Art Policy as Social Practice

Jeremy Deller, Scott King and William Morris. A poster in response to the British government’s 2010 proposal to cut funding for the arts by 25 percent.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Jeffrey Skoller’s response to the workshop “Appropriate Technologies,” which was part of the practicum Valuing Labor in the Arts hosted by the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley. Skoller asserts, “Given how many young artists today are making art as social practice, relational aesthetics, and cultural activism, and who are devoting their careers to social activism, it is striking that there is[.....]

Valuing Labor in the Arts: Negotiating Terms and Setting Precedents

Gauging the Grey Area workshop, Valuing Laboring in the Arts practicum, April 19, 2014, UC Berkeley Art Museum. Courtesy of the Arts Research Center, UC Berkeley. Photo: Joseph del Pesco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Patricia Maloney’s response to the workshop “Gauging the Gray Area: Standards for Artistic Labor,” which was part of the practicum Valuing Labor in the Arts hosted by the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley. Maloney notes, “…negotiation is the most demonstrable and effective means of creating agency.” This article was originally published on May 22, 2014. “Gauging the[.....]

Value/Labor/Arts: The Manifestos

W.A.G.E., Artist Payment Graphic, excerpt from W.A.G.E. graphic poster of artist survey results, 2011.

From our friends at Art Practical, today we bring you a publication that is more archive than article: Value/Labor/Arts: The Manifestos was one part of the spectacular issue “Valuing Labor in the Arts” that was guest-edited by Shannon Jackson, Director of the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley. Compiled by Jackson and artist Helena Keeffe, Value/Labor/Arts: The Manifestos presents seven “recent and… not-so-very-old manifestos of artists who found[.....]

Valuing Labor in the Arts: Appropriate Technologies

The Thing Quarterly, John Baldessari edition. Courtesy of The Thing Quarterly. Photo: Michael O'Neal.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an essay on artistic projects that use strategies of self-empowerment and local control. Author Abigail Satinsky notes, “There is no definite solution for a more just and democratic art world—not everyone wants that, anyway—yet critically examining these projects offers possibilities for the way that many kinds of art worlds can create models of survival and perhaps[.....]

Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, Ponte City, 2008-ongoing; installation view, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. Courtesy of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Ian Reeves.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Larissa Archer‘s review of Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa, currently on view at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. The review highlights the work of photographers Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, whose portraits, video projects, and zines reveal the lives of the residents living in a famous Brutalist building in Johannesburg. This article[.....]

Locating Technology: Against Recognition

Zach Blas. Facial Weaponization Suite Communiqué: Fag Face, 2012 (video still); HD video; 08:10. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Zach Blas.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you an essay by Emily K. Holmes, who analyzes the work of artist Zach Blas: “Blas creates space for facial-recognition technology to be not only strange, but dangerous and deserving of our critical questioning.” This article was originally published on April 16, 2014. Biometric technologies aim to “authenticate” and “verify” individuals by digitally scanning physical traits on[.....]