Posts Tagged ‘Asian Art Museum’

From Two Arises Three at the Asian Art Museum

Michael Cherney and Arnold Chang. After Huang Gongwong 4, 2009 (detail); photographic inkjet print and ink on paper. From the collection of Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang. Courtesy of the Artist and Asian Art Museum. Photo: Jing Cao.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Jing Cao reviews FromTwo Arises Three: The Collaborative Works of Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Chinese landscape painting is[…..]

#Hashtags: The Global in the Local

Wendelien van Oldenborgh. La Javanaise, 2012. Film production still. Photo by Bárbara Wagner.

#globalization #museums #access #representation #decolonization #history A recent conference at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, “Collecting Geographies—Global Programming and Museums of Modern Art,” invited participants to question the responsibilities accrued to arts institutions when they present works of global cultural production as a response to market interest. Each of the topics raised by these questions—globalization, colonial collections, and the critical history of the museum among[…..]

#Hashtags: The Importer/Exporter

Jeffrey Augustine Songco. Blissed Out, 2013. HD looping video. © Jeffrey Augustine Songco. Courtesy of the artist and Steven Wolf Fine Arts, San Francisco.

#commerce #spirituality #appropriation #commodification #orientalism The third and final installment of the Asian Art Museum’s Proximities series of contemporary art exhibitions addresses Asia’s central role in networks of trade, manufacturing, and information. On the whole, this series’ focus on looking at Asia through an American lens has revealed significantly more about America and the Bay Area than about Asia. As with the first and second[…..]

#Hashtags: Nostalgia and its Discontents

Charlene Tan. Love Forever: A Homage to Yayoi Kusama, 2010. Color photograph. 36 x 48 in. Photo courtesy of the artist.

#museums #diversity #nostalgia #representation Proximities 2: Knowing Me, Knowing You was the second of three exhibitions of Bay Area contemporary art curated by Glen Helfand for the Asian Art Museum. This series marks a departure from AAM’s customary focus on artists from remote geographic locales and the museum’s heretofore sporadic commitment to exhibiting contemporary art. The second exhibition resolved the primary concern that I raised[…..]

#Hashtags: Proximity and Migration

Yamini Nayar. Head Over Heals, 2013. Lightjet print. Courtesy the artist, Thomas Erben Gallery, New York and Jhaveri Contemporary, Mumbai.

#institutions #representation #access #sustainability #visibility #regionalism #globalism Two shows at San Francisco museums this past July proposed to reconcile gaps between local and global concerns. For Proximities I: What Time Is It There? at the Asian Art Museum, guest curator Glen Helfand asked a group of Bay Area artists to consider the concept of Asia from the perspective of the culturally uninitiated. Migrating Identities, at Yerba[…..]

Proximities 1: What Time Is It There? at the Asian Art Museum

Proximities 1: What Time is it There?, installation view, Asian Art Museum. Courtesy Asian Art Museum, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses (250–400 words) to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Ariel Zaccheo reviews Proximities 1: What Time Is It There? at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Entering the gallery that houses What Time[…..]

The Past Haunts the Future at San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum

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The current exhibition at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco is my favorite kind of museum show. Phantoms of Asia combines the old, new, profound, weird, classic and kitsch in a lineup of artists that exemplifies the infinite connections between past and present. The 150 works cover such a broad range of media and time that it is hard to not be impressed by[…..]