Posts Tagged ‘Ben Davis’

Best of 2015 – #Hashtags: The Business End of Art

Occupy London Stock Exchange. Capitalism is in Crisis. 2013.

For today’s installment of our Best of 2015 series, we have a selection from regular contributor Amelia Rina, who writes: “Money is a decidedly taboo topic in conversations about creative production. Artists, writers, musicians, and all creative people are either expected to be disinterested in the monetary value of their work, or be accused of ‘selling out.’ This devaluation impulse must change if we hope[…..]

#Hashtags: The Business End of Art

Steve Lambert. Capitalism Works For Me! True/False, 2011.
9 ft x 20 ft x 7 ft.
Aluminum and electrical.

#artmarket #creativeeconomy #collectors #entrepreneur #philanthropy #support As in nearly every field of commerce, it seems that the tension between old and new models of the business of art is coming to a head. Traditional galleries see that their established methods of selling selectively and covertly to buyers of high social standing are under threat. Museums, which once were beneficiaries of philanthropic largesse from those same[…..]

How Small It Actually Is

Artwork by William Powhida, from the cover of  "9.5 Theses on Art and Class" by Ben Davis.

Today from our friends at Guernica, we bring you an excerpt from Alex Zafiris’ recent interview with Ben Davis. Zafiris notes: “As with all empires, the art world is driven by money. What differentiates it, at least in some cases, is its very particular set of values.” This interview was originally published on October 1, 2014. In 2010, Ben Davis, a young art critic and regular contributor to[…..]

#Hashtags: Culture, Class, and the New Economy

Stephanie Syjuco. Bedazzle a Tech Bus (I Mock Up Your Ideas): Anna Gray and Ryan Wilson Paulsen "Class War" Bus, 2014. Digital image. Submission to Mission Local's "Bedazzle a Tech Bus" Call for Entries.

#access #technology #gentrification #class #labor #place The recent election of Mayor Bill de Blasio in New York was hailed by many as a sign that the trend of economic displacement in major American urban centers was coming to an end. De Blasio ran on a progressive platform of government that serves the neediest, rather than campaign donors, and won handily on that message despite the[…..]