Posts Tagged ‘Best of 2014’

Best of 2014 – #Hashtags: Culture, Class, and the New Economy

Stephanie Syjuco. Bedazzle a Tech Bus (I Mock Up Your Ideas): John Gourley "Gringo" Bus, 2014. Digital image. Submission to Mission Local's "Bedazzle a Tech Bus" Call for Entries.

As part of our ten-year anniversary celebrations, we’re considering the best of a decade of arts criticism. Today’s selection comes from our executive director Michele Carlson, who writes, “I reread this essay the same day that San Francisco’s first fleet of self-driving Uber cars rolled out and one sailed straight through a red light in front of SFMOMA. This comes on the heels of the[…..]

Best of 2014 – BP Walk through British Art at Tate Britain

Installation view; BP Walk through British Art; Courtesy of Tate Britain. Photo: A. E. Driggs.

As we bring our Best of 2014 series to a close, our final selection comes from executive director Patricia Maloney, who writes, “Is there a more succinct and scathing critique of institutional staunchness—in the dried up, weary etymological sense of the word—than the one Adam Rompel lobs at the Tate Britain? ‘Precedent is the opposite of cool, and Tate Britain reveled in its gray soul,[…..]

Best of 2014 – #Hashtags: Mimics and Minstrels

Sturtevant. Warhol Black Marilyn. 2004. Synthetic polymer silkscreen and acrylic on canvas. 15 ¾ x 13 ¾ in. (40 x 35 cm). Ringier Collection, courtesy Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London.  © Sturtevant.

Continuing our Best of 2014 series, regular contributor Tori Bush writes, “Anuradha Vikram’s essay reflects on how American institutions, both in the art world and the real world, have myopic—if not completely blind—views on the state of bias and racism today. If institutions of knowledge and culture like the Whitney Biennial cannot be more equitable in their curatorial choices, what example can be set for other American institutions[…..]

Best of 2014 – Help Desk: Stop, Thief!

Raymond Pettibon. No Title (Are your motives), 1987; ink on paper.

For today’s installment of our Best of 2014 series, we have a selection from regular contributor Adam Rompel, who writes, “What’s better than having an art-existential crisis? Finding the answer to one. I picked this specific ‘Help Desk’ entry because it hits a universal neurotic nerve that all artists have around authorship and originality. It is one that has informed my own work more than any[…..]

Best of 2014 – Shotgun Reviews: From Two Arises Three at the Asian Art Museum

Michael Cherney and Arnold Chang. After Huang Gongwong 4, 2009 (detail); photographic inkjet print and ink on paper. From the collection of Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang. Courtesy of the Artist and Asian Art Museum. Photo: Jing Cao.

As we continue our look back over the year, today’s Best of 2014 selection comes from Kara Q. Smith, who writes, “Shotgun Reviews are one of my favorite ways to hear about exhibitions from near and far. They are a way for those who aren’t regular contributors to Art Practical and Daily Serving to publish with us. Jing’s review lucidly weaves descriptions with analysis, allowing[…..]

Best of 2014 – Suzanne Opton: Soldier at Sikkema Jenkins

Suzanne Opton. Soldier: H. Jefferson- Length of service undisclosed, 2005. Archival Pigment Print.  41 x 52 inches. Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins

Continuing our Best of 2014 series, Shotgun Review Editor Erica Gomez writes, “I read Lia Wilson’s review of Soldier six months ago, on my birthday. Having recently spent time with my dad—a U.S. Army Afghanistan Veteran—I recognized the thousand-yard stare in one of Suzanne Opton’s photographs all too well. Wilson points to the series’ ‘potential for a reflective encounter between viewer and subject’ and calls[…..]

Best of 2014 – Fan Mail: Wendy Given

Wendy Given. On Myth and Magic No. 5: Eclipse, 2009; C-Print; 17.25” x 26” inches. Photo courtesy of the artist.

For today’s installment of our Best of 2014 series, we have a selection from executive director Patricia Maloney, who writes, “Reading A. Will Brown’s twice-monthly ‘Fan Mail’ series over the past year, one gets a distinct sense of how much fun he has in making his selections and thinking about the work. The opening sentences are often the giveaway: an introduction to the artist by way[…..]