Posts Tagged ‘Best of 2015’

Best of 2015 – Jennifer Moon, Jemima Wyman, and Robby Herbst at Commonwealth & Council

Jemima Wyman. Conjuring Radical Openness, 2015; Bronze; 20 x 19 x 9 in.; Unique edition of 3 + 1 A.P. Courtesy the artist and Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles.

Jemima Wyman. Conjuring Power, 2015; DIY fabric-prints on cotton poplin, painted steel rods; Site-specific installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles.

As part of our ten-year anniversary celebrations, we’re considering the best of a decade of arts criticism. Today’s selection comes from the editor in chief of our sister publication, Art Practical: Kara Q. Smith opines, “It’s not easy to write about three shows in 1,000 words, but what I love about this review by Matt Stromberg is his ability to nod to the [California] art history that[…..]

Best of 2015 – Ann Hirsch: Playground at JOAN

Ann Hirsch. Playground, 2015 (performance still); 65 minutes. Courtesy of JOAN, Los Angeles, . Featuring AnneMarie Wolf and Gene Gallerano. Runtime . Photo: Ruben Diaz.

As we come to the end of our Best of 2015 series, our final selection comes from editor in chief Bean Gilsdorf, who writes: “I love our Shotgun Reviews program: Anyone anywhere in the world can submit a review for publication. We keep the format short so that it’s accessible, and authors have ranged from a thirteen-year-old newcomer to a lifelong writer with many prior arts publications to[…..]

Best of 2015 – The Great Debate About Art at Upfor

Ben Buswell. ABRACADABRA (Perish Like the Word), 2015; graphite and non-photo blue; 38 x 20 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Upfor. Photo: Mario Gallucci.

DSAP director Patricia Maloney selected today’s installment for our Best of 2015 series: “Ashley Stull Meyers doesn’t shy away from calling out an exhibition with as grand a title as The Great Debate About Art for what it leaves unexamined. The effort to determine the limits or properties of what constitutes art is a quixotic task, and Meyers acknowledges the absurdity inherent in the premise right from[…..]

Best of 2015 – Ten Years Gone at the New Orleans Museum of Art

Christopher Saucedo. World Trade Center as a Cloud (No. 5). 2011. Linen pulp on cotton paper. 60 x 40 inches. Image courtesy of the artist.

Today’s Best of 2015 selection comes from our director, Patricia Maloney, who writes, “In her heartbreaking memoir, The Year of Magical Thinking, Joan Didion accounts for grief’s measure of time as very different from chronological time. It keeps one suspended in a particular moment or progressing from that moment at a glacial pace in comparison to the pace of days and weeks. In her review of Ten[…..]

Best of 2015 – #Hashtags: The Business End of Art

Occupy London Stock Exchange. Capitalism is in Crisis. 2013.

For today’s installment of our Best of 2015 series, we have a selection from regular contributor Amelia Rina, who writes: “Money is a decidedly taboo topic in conversations about creative production. Artists, writers, musicians, and all creative people are either expected to be disinterested in the monetary value of their work, or be accused of ‘selling out.’ This devaluation impulse must change if we hope[…..]

Best of 2015 – Interview with Nick Cave

Nick Cave, Soundsuits, 2015; Mixed media. Courtesy of Shreveport Regional Arts Council. Photo: Casey Jones.

As we continue our look back over the year, today’s selection for our Best of 2015 series comes from Shotgun Reviews editor Emily Holmes: “As the year wraps up, I was pleased to see Tori Bush’s recent interview with Nick Cave. I remember not knowing who he was when his work was at San Francisco’s Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, and I regretfully missed the exhibition.[…..]

Best of 2015 – Margret: Chronicle of an Affair at White Columns

Margret: Chronicle of an Affair—May 1969 to December 1970, 2015; detail. Courtesy of White Columns / Delmes & Zander.

For today’s installment of our Best of 2015 series, regular contributor Ashley Stull Meyers writes, “To exhibit art by little-known or purposefully anonymous artists holds a cultish allure over the contemporary art world. In the curious case of Gunther K. and his mistress Margaret, a nearly fifty-year-old abandoned suitcase held archival ephemera too arresting for its maker’s obscurity to be institutionally relevant. Reading the review of[…..]