Posts Tagged ‘#BlackLivesMatter’

From the Archives – Black Chronicles II at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

Peter Jackson aka ‘The Black Prince’. London Stereoscopic Company, 2 December 1889. 42.5 x 31.5”. Framed & Unglazed. Courtesy of © Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

“New struggles for civil and race rights continue to challenge and mine the unequal fields of representation within American political life.” So writes author Jordan Amirkhani, who explored this exhibition earlier in 2016, and connected these studio portraits from the late 1800s to current images from the Black Lives Matter movement. Today from our archives we consider Black visibility in culture and history. This article was originally published on May[…..]

Letter from the Executive Director: Living the Art World We Make

Christopher Paul Jordan and Jaleesa Trapp. Art Hack Seattle project, 2016; installation view, Velocity:V2. Courtesy of the Artists.

Since I took on the role of Executive Director of Daily Serving and Art Practical, working with an administrative staff of four fierce, intersectional, women-identified cultural producers, I have been asked to think and rethink what it means to work. Whom do we work for? What is our work, and most importantly, what world does it create? In the past month, I have witnessed the[…..]

Why Museums Should Be a Safe Space to Discuss Why #BlackLivesMatter

blacklivesmatter

Today, from our friends at Smithsonian Magazine, we bring you Menachem Wecker’s piece on the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture’s panel  “History, Rebellion, and Reconciliation.” The symposium “proved even timelier than organizers could have possible imagined,” taking place less than a week after the death of Freddie Gray in police custody. In the wake of seemingly endless tragedy, the Museum of African American History and other[…..]

Black Chronicles II at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

Unidentified Sitter. Edinburgh, c. 1900. Photographer/Studio: Alex Ayton Junior. Carte-de-visite, 64 x 100 mm. Courtesy of Val Wilmer Collection.

Born on the Danish island colony of Saint Croix with two generations of slaves behind him, the champion heavyweight boxer Peter Jackson cuts a lean and noble figure in his 1889 photographic portrait, his top hat perched level upon his head, his elegant Victorian garments pressed, his stylish accoutrements placed as evidence of his social persona as a gentleman–dandy. The portrait was taken just a[…..]

Sheila Pree Bright: 1960Now at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia

Sheila Pree Bright. BringIt, 2015; chalkboard. 1960Now, installation view, The Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia. Courtesy of the Artist.

1960Now, on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia, is an expansion of photographer Sheila Pree Bright’s continued interest in naming and documenting the unknown leaders of African American social movements: the influential agitators, groundbreakers, and activists whose names might not have been Rosa, Martin, or Malcolm. In her latest photographic project, Bright points to a new generation of faces experiencing frustrations and[…..]