Posts Tagged ‘ceramics’

Coille Hooven: Tell it by Heart at the Museum of Arts and Design, New York

Installation view of Coille Hooven: Tell It By Heart.
Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Lux Yuting Bai reviews Coille Hooven’s Tell It By Heart at the Museum of Arts and Design, New York. Focusing on material-based[…..]

Ken Price: Death Shrine I at the Harwood Museum of Art

Ken Price. Death Shrine I, 1972-76; dimensions variable. Courtesy of Ken Price Studio.

Ken Price is best known for his psychedelic ceramic sculptures: abstractions layered in paint and sanded to pristine finishes. His piece Death Shrine I (1972–1976), permanently installed at the Harwood Museum of Art in Taos, New Mexico, is an unexpected departure from this canon. The shrine is a facet of Price’s Happy’s Curios project, and is one of three such installations inspired by the iconography[…..]

Ehren Tool: One Death Is a Tragedy at Pro Arts Gallery

Ehren Tool’s cup-throwing demonstration; Frank Ogawa Plaza, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014; Pro Arts Gallery, Oakland, California. Courtesy of the Artist and Pro Arts Gallery. Photo: Amanda N. Simons.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Amanda N. Simons reviews Ehren Tool’s solo exhibition One Death Is a Tragedy at Pro Arts Gallery in Oakland, California. Ehren Tool’s 2 x 2 Solos[…..]

The Weird and the Northwest: An Interview with Cynthia Lahti

Cynthia Lahti’s work spans a multitude of mediums, from collage to ceramics, altered books, and painting. Populated by strange or uncanny figures—often children in masks and costumes—her works are odes to the off-kilter. If there’s violence in her mark-making, nearby is always a tender or vulnerable gesture. Tailing her solo exhibition Elsewhere at PDX Contemporary and a residency in Berlin, Cynthia Lahti was also recently[…..]