Posts Tagged ‘Charles Gaines’

Odd Jobs: Charles Gaines

Charles Gaines. Numbers and Trees V. Landscape #8: Orange Crow, 1978; acrylic sheet, acrylic paint, watercolor, photograph. 46 5⁄8 × 38 5⁄8 in. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.

For the past forty years, Charles Gaines has employed system-based methodologies to his artmaking in order to critique subjective expression within art. Influenced by Tantric Buddhist diagrams in the late 1960s, his photographs, drawings, and works on paper investigate how rule-based procedures construct order and meaning. Gaines is also a highly regarded educator at the California Institute of the Arts. He received his MFA from the Rochester[…..]

#Hashtags: Conceptualizing Difference

Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974-1989. 
Installation view at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. February 8-May 24, 2015. Photography by Brian Forrest.

#institutions #race #conceptualism #access #appropriation A recent performance at Brown University by conceptual poet Kenneth Goldsmith has resurrected what had seemed to be a long-ago-settled debate. Goldsmith, whose poetic practice is based on appropriation, presented an adaptation of the autopsy report of Ferguson, Missouri, police shooting victim Michael Brown as a poetic reading during the Interrupt 3 arts festival in mid-March. The subsequent commentary has largely taken Goldsmith to task for what many perceive to have[…..]

Charles Gaines and Sol LeWitt at Paula Cooper NYC

Sol LeWitt. 12x12x1 TO 2x2x6, 1990; painted wood; 99x7x57 ½ in. Courtesy of Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. Photo: Steven Probert.

Two shows at Paula Cooper—Sol LeWitt: Wall Drawing 564 and Charles Gaines: Notes on Social Justice—knowingly nod at each other from their respective spaces across West Twenty-First Street. Wall Drawing 564: Complex forms with color ink washes superimposed (1988) holds court in Cooper’s large, dramatic exhibition hall surrounded by roughly contemporaneous structures and works on paper, and the immersive drawing exhibits LeWitt’s sustained interest in the grid[…..]