Posts Tagged ‘China’

He Yunchang: Water Forming Stone at Ink Studio

He Yunchang. Inner Sanctuary, 2015. Courtesy of INK Studio.

A clear and joyful light floods the inner gallery of Ink Studio in Beijing, where He Yunchang performed a series of three grueling new works in his exhibition Water Forming Stone. Light dances through candy-colored drinking glasses that are suspended in midair over a pedestal of simulated crystals and jade. It radiates off of the warm white walls cleverly composed of cardboard shipping boxes and[…..]

Chen Zhen: Without Going to New York and Paris, Life Could Be Internationalised at Rockbund Art Museum

Chen Zhen, Purification Room, 2000 - 2015. found objects, clay, approx 850 x 1100 x 450cm, image courtesy Rockbund Museum and Galleria Continua, San Gimignano/Beijing/Les Moulins

Chen Zhen, who died (much too young) in Paris in 2000, was a significant artist with a hybrid Chinese and European identity. Although after 1986 he essentially lived and worked in Paris, his personal history and deep cultural roots lay in China, and specifically in Shanghai. From the mid-1990s he returned over and over to a city on fast-forward. Shanghai was undergoing a massive, controversial transformation,[…..]

From the Archives – Material Practices: Stitching, Fabric, and Textiles in the work of Contemporary Chinese Artists

Yin Xiuzhen, Portable City, Sydney, 2003       photo: Yin Xiuzhen         collection by Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, image courtesy the artist

For Labor Day weekend, we bring you this piece from the archives that deals with gendered, often invisible labor—the kind not celebrated on national labor days. Luise Guest explores the work of several contemporary Chinese women artists using embroidery in revolutionary ways. This review was originally published on January 10, 2014. Mao Zedong once said that revolution is not a dinner party. Less famously, he said[…..]

Van Gogh on Demand: China and the Readymade

How to Paint van Gogh’s “Sunflowers.” Photos of Zhao Xiaoyong and apprentice, eight states of two van Gogh Sunflowers, oil on canvas, 20 × 24 in., 28 Oct.–6 Nov. 2008. Photos: Winnie Wong.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an excerpt from their Printed Matters column, a review of Winnie Won Yin Wong’s book Van Gogh on Demand: China and the Readymade. The review’s author, Jing Cao, makes note of the ramifications of Wong’s analysis: “In order to welcome ‘Chinese art’ into the global contemporary, the struggles within Chinese society for artistic legitimacy and the on-the-ground complexities of[…..]

Material Practices: Stitching, Fabric, and Textiles in the work of Contemporary Chinese Artists

Yin Xiuzhen, Portable City, Sydney, 2003       photo: Yin Xiuzhen         collection by Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, image courtesy the artist

Mao Zedong once said that revolution is not a dinner party. Less famously, he said it is not embroidery, either. Interestingly, however, some female contemporary Chinese artists have chosen to work with thread and textiles—and embroidery—in experimental, maybe even revolutionary ways. From Lin Tianmiao’s overt exploration of sexuality, fecundity, and the aging and decay of the body, to Yin Xiuzhen’s use of the embodied memories[…..]

Yam Lau: Tour China at Hamilton Artists Inc.

Canada has a strong history of artist-run spaces; from Montreal to Vancouver, Winnipeg to Halifax, alternative spaces for displaying art are as Canadian as hockey. Hamilton Artists Inc. is a key voice in this tradition of noncommercial spaces directed by artists. What is innovative about their current exhibition, Yam Lau’s Tour China, is that the gallery space is turned outward; the show consists of a single piece[…..]

Li Songsong: We Have Betrayed the Revolution at Pace London

Li Songsong. Guests Are All Welcome, 2013; Oil on canvas, 120cm x 120cm. Li Songsong: We Have Betrayed the Revolution, 2013; Courtesy Pace Gallery.

It would be easy to come to Li Songsong’s show at Pace London with certain assumptions, projections, and ideas about the last ten years of contemporary painting from China. Assumptions informed by how galleries have vulgarly packaged Chinese contemporary art as a struggle for freer (market) expression. Projections on what it means for an artist to make a painting in post-Deng Xiaoping‘s China. Ideas built[…..]