Posts Tagged ‘Chris Burden’

Summer Session – Do You Believe in Television? Chris Burden and TV

Chris Burden, still from TV Hijack, 1972. Photo: G. Beydler. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery, © Chris Burden.

This Summer Session we’re thinking about celebrity, which necessarily includes the ways in which celebrity is most easily produced and consumed—that is, we’re also thinking about television. Today we bring you an excerpt from an article published on East of Borneo by Nick Stillman, regarding Chris Burden’s television performances of the 1970s, which used the medium of television to challenge the consumerist ethos it perpetuated, unlike its complicit[…..]

Marilyn Arsem: 100 Ways to Consider Time at MFA Boston

Marilyn Arsem: 100 Ways to Consider Time at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, performance still. Image Courtesy the artist and the Museum of Fine Arts Boston.

I visited the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston on the 68th day of Marilyn Arsem’s 100-day-long performance exhibition, 100 Ways to Consider Time. The premise behind Arsem’s exhibition (which exists, it seems, as one piece or work) is that the artist will be on-site, situated in a gallery inside the museum, for each of the 100 days of the show. As the museum is[…..]

Chris Burden: Extreme Measures at the New Museum

Chris Burden. Documentation of Selected Works 1971-1974 (film still), 1971-75. SD Video, color and black and white, sound. 34:38 min. Courtesy of The New Museum.

Chris Burden is one of the legendary giants of performance art. In his seminal body pieces from the early 1970s, he orchestrated a series of daredevil brutalities and tests of the body’s resilience. Burden has had a more prolonged career, however, as a large-scale installation artist who masterminds feats of engineering that seem divorced from the body: scaled-down replicas of major bridges, a giant scale[…..]

Help Desk: With Intent

.Chris Burden, L.A.P.D. Uniform, 1994. Fabric, leather, wood, metal & plastic, 88 x 72 x 6 inches (223.5 x 182.9 x 15.2 cm) Ed. of 30

Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, patrons, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. Help Desk is co-sponsored by How important is it to consider the intent of an artist when viewing his or her work? Your position on this matter depends on how you feel about[…..]

A California State of Mind, Circa 1970

Alright, I’ll say it. A show that features conceptual art circa 1970 threatens to be dry. At the outset, you know you’ll be getting mostly documentation: photographic, video, film, and paper. Beyond the ordinary wall text, there will probably be artists’ statements explaining what was done while you weren’t looking. The typewriter, the mimeograph, and the camera will act as not-so-silent partners to the artists’[…..]

HAIRY: An Interview with Chris Sollars

For the last year, Bay Area artist Chris Sollars has sported a biblical behemoth of a beard, although his cleanly shaven cheeks are once again on view in Sollars’s newest project, Hairy, shown as part of YBCA’s Bay Area Now.  It’s an interesting update on an identity-probing lineage that includes predecessors like Chris Burden, Gordon Matta Clark, James Luna, Ana Mendieta, and David Hammons.  DailyServing[…..]

Robert Lendrum: I’ve Been Shot

In the 1988 action film, Die Hard, John McClane (played by Bruce Willis) hustles around a Los Angeles skyscraper—sweat-soaked and shirtless—in an effort to save his wife and other hostages from a ruthless terrorist group. At various points throughout the film, McClane (an NYPD officer) survives a partial jump from an exploding building and smashes through a plate glass window. Basically, he is injured to[…..]