Posts Tagged ‘class’

Summer Session – #Hashtags: Culture, Class and the New Economy

Michal Wisniowski. "Guard Secrets" Google Bus, 2014. Digital image. Submission to Mission Local's "Bedazzle a Tech Bus" Call for Entries.

The first theme in our Summer Session series is labor, and today we’re revisiting Anuradha Vikram’s essay on the so-called creative economy and its effects: “The mythology of the creative economy explains much of why San Franciscans who have pioneered this approach to work are under-invested in the arts despite some apparent affinities. Why support artists with your hard-earned income when you are fully convinced you[…..]

Albert Yowshien Kuo: Gonna Be Alright at Hoffman LaChance Contemporary

Albert Yowshien Kuo. Still Boxing, 2016; Oil and Mixed Media on Canvas; 70 x 66 in. Courtesy of Albert Yowshien Kuo. Photo: Albert Yowshien Kuo.

Albert Yowshein Kuo’s solo exhibition, Gonna Be Alright, at Hoffman LaChance Contemporary features three large paintings. In them, he depicts figurative tableaux that obliquely reflect social values such as race and gender. The paintings are familiar and unfamiliar, timeless and contemporary. To simply say that Kuo’s juxtapositions of figures and scenes is surreal would be too easy a summation. While painted in a traditional style[…..]

#Hashtags: In Defense of the Middle-Class Artist

Jeremy Deller. English Magic, 2013. 55th Venice Biennale.

#art #class #wealth #access #innovation #middleclass Writing for Artnet in January, Ben Davis’s “Do You Have to Be Rich to Make It as an Artist?” raised an important question about the relationship between privilege and access to a life in the arts. Examining the upbringings of a number of artists currently or recently on view at museums in New York, Davis drew the conclusion that if[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: Whose Museum Is It Anyway?

Installation view of Mike Kelley at MoMA PS1, 2013. Photo: Matthew Septimus.

Here at Daily Serving, we keep an eye on the ways an exhibition’s impact changes depending on geographical location. With a recent editorial on what 30 Americans means in Detroit and December’s protest of omitting artists of color in Art AIDS America at the Tacoma Art Museum in mind, today we bring you Anuradha Vikram’s observations on shifting context, intended audiences, and racialized access to and[…..]

Help Desk: Participatory Project

Joav BarEl. Installation view of Center of the World, 2014 at Tempo Rubato Gallery, Tel Aviv.

Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, patrons, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. I’m an artist working with a poor family on a participatory project at a local museum. They are Latino. The project is about their perceptions of art. Who might I talk to or where[…..]

How Small It Actually Is

Artwork by William Powhida, from the cover of  "9.5 Theses on Art and Class" by Ben Davis.

Today from our friends at Guernica, we bring you an excerpt from Alex Zafiris’ recent interview with Ben Davis. Zafiris notes: “As with all empires, the art world is driven by money. What differentiates it, at least in some cases, is its very particular set of values.” This interview was originally published on October 1, 2014. In 2010, Ben Davis, a young art critic and regular contributor to[…..]

#Hashtags: The Squeezing of the Middle Class Gallery

Tracey Snelling. "Mystery Hour," Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco, CA, December 19, 2013 - February 1, 2014. Photo credit: John Janca. Courtesy of the artist and Rena Bransten Gallery.

#commerce #place-making #policy #class #gentrification With their leases recently terminated, the mid-sized galleries at 77 Geary Street in San Francisco are the latest casualties of the massive wealth divide that plagues contemporary American society. Gallerists George Krevsky, Rena Bransten, and Mark Jawgiel were notified that their month-to-month leases would be discontinued to make space for technology company MuleSoft to expand into the building’s second floor.[…..]