Posts Tagged ‘Collage’

Fan Mail: Ashley Pastore

Ashley Pastore. Real Women Make Their Mark; pen, tea, cut magazine; 40 x 32 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Ashley Pastore has a thing for old science and life magazines. Poring over dated issues of National Geographic, Pastore has come to appreciate the visual aesthetic and color palette of print from the ’50s to ’80s, which she describes as being rich, deep, and full-bodied. After scouring Craigslist and rummaging through random thrift stores, the artist now has a sizable collection of vintage magazines that[…..]

Jay DeFeo/Alter Ego at Hosfelt Gallery

Jay DeFeo, Untitled, 1973; gelatin silver print, 7 3/4 x 9 9/16 in., Estate no. P0778A. May not be reproduced in any form without permission of The Jay DeFeo Trust, © 2015 The Jay DeFeo Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Jay DeFeo/Alter Ego at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Author Anton Stuebner notes, “In reconceptualizing the forms of her everyday life, DeFeo’s work suggests the importance of embracing the imaginary and the real as necessary complements.” This article was originally published on October 1, 2015. Shadows suffuse Jay DeFeo’s work. In her gelatin silver prints,[…..]

Gwenaël Rattke: Not Fun And Not Free at Romer Young Gallery

Gwenaël Rattke: NOT FUN AND NOT FREE installation view. Courtesy of Romer Young Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Danica Willard Sachs reviews Gwenaël Rattke’s Not Fun And Not Free at Romer Young Gallery in San Francisco. Gwenaël Rattke’s exhibition Not[…..]

From the Archive – Fan Mail: Joe Webb

Joe Webb. TV Times, 2014; collage; 9 ½” x 6 ¾” inches. Image courtesy of the artist.

Almost a year ago today we published an article featuring the work of Joe Webb. Fan Mail columnist Will Brown selected Webb’s work from hundreds of reader submissions, noting that “humor comes to the fore in all of [the artist’s] images.” Currently, Webb’s work is on view in the Prints & Originals Gallery at the Saatchi Gallery in London through April 7, 2015. This article was originally published on March[…..]

Michael Pajon: Palimpsest at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery

Michael Pajon. The Night was Clear as Her Puddled Tears. 2014. Mixed media collage on book covers. 11 x 19 inches. Image: Courtesy of the Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, 2015.

To invoke a palimpsest is to find oneself wading into an extremely fertile territory of meaning. With equal relevance to the development of mathematics, geology, architecture, and memory studies, the term has transcended its origins as a reusable writing parchment in ancient Greece to become a material metaphor for the multilayered history of a particular place, epoch, or individual subject. Despite the term’s dynamic etymological[…..]

Saying Yes to Everything at Honor Fraser

Ray Yoshida. Comic Book Specimen #1 — Right Profile, c. 1965; Collage on paper, 22 x 28 in. Courtesy of the estate of Ray Yoshida. Photo Tom Van Eynde. Collection of KAWS, New York.

Saying Yes to Everything, an exhibition featuring nineteen artists working in collage, recently opened at Honor Fraser Gallery in Los Angeles. On display are a range of works made between 1960 and the present day by both established and emerging artists. The title is a commentary on the essential inclusivity of collage. But understanding the medium’s place in art history can help the viewer appreciate[…..]

Deborah Roberts: One and Many at Art Palace

Deborah Roberts. Untitled No. 33, n.d.; Mixed media on paper, 14 x 17 in.

From our friends at Glasstire, today we bring you a review of Deborah Roberts’ current solo show at Art Palace in Houston, Texas. Author Betsy Huete notes, “To make political work without literally telling the viewer how he should think or feel is a tall order, yet Roberts pulls it off masterfully by intertwining the personal with the ideological. She infuses her work with subtle yet powerful[…..]