Posts Tagged ‘Collage’

Fan Mail: Suchitra Mattai

Suchitra Mattai. Generally, I don’t think that way II, 2016; mixed media installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Wes Magyar.

Suchitra Mattai’s work turns about conceptual and material inversions. It thrives on site-specificity while rejecting its basic premise—that specificity necessarily connotes place-ness. Having been raised on two separate continents and with cultural heritages tracing back to a third, Mattai is familiar with incongruities between the illusory promise of place and her lived experiences. Her practice is disjointed and dreamlike, yet throughout her uneasy landscapes runs[…..]

Lou Beach: End of Days at Jack Fischer Gallery

Lou Beach. Poltroons on Parade (Pigeon! Pigeon! Pigeon!), 2016; collage; 33 x 26 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Fischer Gallery. Photo: Lou Beach.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maria Porges reviews Lou Beach: End of Days at Jack Fischer Gallery’s Minnesota Street Project location in San Francisco. In Lou Beach: End[…..]

Adam Pendleton: Becoming Imperceptible at Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans

Adam Pendleton. Installation Shot of System of Display, X (EXPRESS/Poro secret society mask, Mano, Liberia). 2016. Silkscreen ink on Plexiglas and mirror. Image courtesy of the artist and the Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans.

Curated by Dr. Andrea Andersson, Adam Pendleton: Becoming Imperceptible is the most extensive museum presentation of the artist’s work to date—a significant triumph for a cultural institution located in New Orleans, one of the most racially and politically fraught cities in the southern United States. While the exhibition’s rich display resonates with the variety of material and conceptual strategies at work in Pendleton’s oeuvre, it[…..]

From the Archives – Weaving, Not Cloth: Mark Bradford at SFMOMA

Mark Bradford, Potable Water, 2005; billboard paper, photomechanical reproductions, acrylic gel medium, and additional mixed media; 130 x 196 inches; collection of Hunter Gray; © Mark Bradford; photo: Bruce M. White

We always like to see artist Mark Bradford’s name pop up in the press. Of course, there’s the fantastic news that Bradford will be representing the U.S. in this year’s Venice Biennale, in addition to last week’s cheekily delivered critique of art auctions (while onsite at Christie’s). Today, we’re republishing Bean Gilsdorf’s meditations on the tactility of Bradford’s work in relation to textiles. This article[…..]

Jorge Macchi: Perspectiva at Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires

Jorge Macchi. Monoblock, 2013; paper. Courtesy of MALBA.

Maps, clocks, dictionaries, music sheets, signals, and words are all different resources we have to decode our reality. By living under a unified structure, we can rest assured that our messages will be understood. A sense of normality is reinforced. But what lies underneath these layers of language? Can we realize how reality is built around us? Do we know how to dismantle the rules[…..]

Fan Mail: Jason Kearney

Jason Kearney. Untoward, 2015; digital collage; 9.8 x 11.8 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Jason Kearney’s collage Untoward (2015) juxtaposes one figure against another, creating an ambiguous relationship. A man sitting at the wheel of a car gazes through the windshield at a man on a fainting couch. The man at the wheel has a perplexed look on his face (viewers can see him reflected in the rear-view mirror)—or maybe he is simply squinting from the sunlight. Untoward is[…..]

Cut-Up at Franklin Street Works

Phyllis Baldino. The Unknown Series, 1994–96 (detail); mixed media. Courtesy of the Artist.

“Everything in the world began with a yes. One molecule said yes to another molecule and life was born,” professes Clarice Lispector in the first lines of her 1977 novel, The Hour of the Star. Like the universe, art also begins with a yes. Some yeses are small: get out of bed today, put this image next to that one. Other yeses are bigger: continue[…..]