Posts Tagged ‘Craft’

On Collecting: Breaking the Borderlands of Function

Hans Coper. Vase without and with flowers; ceramic, 8 x 6 x 4 inches. Courtesy of Jeffrey Spahn Gallery.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Djinnaya Stroud‘s recent profile of three collectors whose acquisitions include functional works. Stroud explains, “The need to understand an object through its use drives many people who would never have been art collectors to amass functional work.” This essay was originally published on December 10, 2014. The term “non-functional art” isn’t satisfying as an antonym for functional[…..]

Disobedient Objects at the Victoria & Albert Museum

Herman Wallace. Fuck the LAW. 2008. Chrome-plated steel pendant. Dimensions Unknown. Private Collection. Photo: Jordan Amirkhani.

Sitting just inside the Great Hall and squeezed between two major retrospective exhibitions of wedding dresses and fashion photographs at the Victoria & Albert in London sits Disobedient Objects, a small but powerful show examining the materials, methods, and inventions of political dissent across the world since the late 1970s. Rich and diverse in its choice of objects, the one-room gallery places a strong emphasis[…..]

From the Archives – Craft is Not Dead

Sebastian Martorana, "Impressions," 2008. Marble. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Patricia A. Young in honor of the 40th Anniversary of the Renwick Gallery and the 30th Anniversary of the James Renwick Alliance.

Today we bring you an article from our archives in celebration of The Brooklyn Rail’s most recent issue, which includes essays by contemporary craft luminaries Namita Wiggers and Glenn Adamson. As Lowery Stokes Sims notes in her excellent editorial essay, “If the notion of ‘diversity’ suggests the fostering of a variety of expressions on an equal footing, then in the visual arts our scrutiny would have to be[…..]

Andrew Nicholls: The Water Works at Turner Galleries

Australian artist Andrew Nicholls dredges the queasy aesthetics of sentiment for its submerged ideological content. In an ongoing thread of his practice, he locates the ideals and practices of British imperialism in the kitsch, seemingly innocuous world of 19th- and 20th-century ceramics, disrupting this historical narrative with traces of the otherness otherwise repressed in the imperial worldview. He subsumes his viewers in an unsteady undertow[…..]

Craft is Not Dead

Sabrina Gschwandtner, “Hula Hoop,” 2010. 16mm film and polyamide thread. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Chris Rifkin in honor of the 40th anniversary of the Renwick Gallery. Photo by Sabrina Gschwandtner.

What defines the art of craft? What is the difference between art and craft? 40 Under 40: Craft Futures at Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery blurred the lines for me, while at the same time helping me to appreciate craft in a new light. There is something about the word “craft” that connotes antiquated techniques that don’t necessarily relate to our contemporary world. This exhibition breathes new[…..]

Jacob Hashimoto: Paper Paradise

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American born Jacob Hashimoto’s eye-catching exhibition, ‘The Other Sun’ at London’s Ronchini Gallery in Mayfair certainly brings to mind planetary brilliance in colour and splendour. Hashimoto uses traditional kite-making materials and techniques to create singular, modular units collectively arranged into numinous, monumental installations and smaller, woven, three-dimensional wall pieces. Hanging by threads, the thousands of multicoloured translucent kites are hand-made with rice paper and bamboo, each tiny kite[…..]

Co-opting Form: An Interview with Liz Miller

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Liz Miller‘s installations are stunningly elaborate compositions, combining materials and shapes in ways that often belie our expectations. In her current exhibition, Recalcitrant Mimesis, Miller responds to the work of Abstract Expressionist painter Clyfford Still, whose museum opened late last year in Denver. Recalcitrant Mimesis is up through today at David B. Smith Gallery in Denver. Miller’s work is also currently included in the group[…..]