Posts Tagged ‘culture’

#Hashtags: Convergences and Displacements

Community assists with evacuation of Townhouse library and archives, April 9, 2016. Photo courtesy Townhouse Gallery.

#Townhouse #Cairo #gentrification #urban #culture #displacement This past week has left the venerable nonprofit Townhouse Gallery shaken. Though the attempted demolition of its building at 10 Nabrawy Street in Cairo has been halted, the gallery is faced with months of work ahead to secure its future. Operating since 1998, Townhouse is known for drawing international artists and thinkers to Egypt, and nurturing an emerging network of[…..]

Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic at Seattle Art Museum

Kehinde Wiley. Mrs. Waldorf Astor, 2012; oil on linen; 72 x 60 inches. © Kehinde Wiley.

A New Republic at Seattle Art Museum is Kehinde Wiley’s second solo exhibition organized by the Brooklyn Museum. In his brief fifteen-year career, Wiley has quickly become an established cultural trope. His works have adorned the set of Empire and served as icons of the FIFA World Cup. His portraits of Black men and women are at once celebrated as a vision of Black empowerment[…..]

Locating Technology: Raiders and Empires

Stephanie Syjuco. RAIDERS: International Booty, Bountiful Harvest (Selections from the Collection of the A____ A__ M_____) (installation view), 2011; digital archival photo prints mounted onto laser-cut wood, hardware, crates; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Catharine Clark, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Genevieve Quick’s most recent “Locating Technology” column, a consideration of artist Stephanie Syjuco’s process and practice: “[Syjuco] prompts viewers to consider more broadly the legality and ethics of museums’ collections, and suggests that museums are institutions of cultural appropriation.” This article was originally published on October 27, 2015. Much of the history of museum collections is related to[…..]

Anicka Yi: You Can Call Me F at The Kitchen

Anicka Yi. Installation view of You Can Call Me F at The Kithcen in New York City , 2015.

At the entrance to the black box of the Kitchen’s upstairs gallery, a long vitrine houses an illuminated culture of bacteria on agar jelly. The cracked slab teems with biological entities colored like bruises on sallow skin. Imprinted with capital letters, it reads: YOU CAN CALL ME F. Anicka Yi’s current solo show stages part breeding ground, part containment camp for “F”—the feminine, the woman[…..]

Robert Frank in America at Cantor Arts Center

Robert Frank. Detroit, 1955; gelatin silver print, 8 ½ x 13 in. Courtesy of Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University. © Robert Frank.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of a new exhibition of Robert Frank’s photographs at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University. Though these photographs are now sixty years old, they are still surprisingly relevant; author Danica Willard Sachs remarks, “Through revealing details, Frank charts the uneasy political geography of a vast country on the verge of change.” This[…..]

How Small It Actually Is

Artwork by William Powhida, from the cover of  "9.5 Theses on Art and Class" by Ben Davis.

Today from our friends at Guernica, we bring you an excerpt from Alex Zafiris’ recent interview with Ben Davis. Zafiris notes: “As with all empires, the art world is driven by money. What differentiates it, at least in some cases, is its very particular set of values.” This interview was originally published on October 1, 2014. In 2010, Ben Davis, a young art critic and regular contributor to[…..]

In ___ We Trust: Art and Money at the Columbus Museum of Art

Claire Fontaine. This Neon Sign Was Made By..., 2009; Back-painted neon, 6400k glass, cables, fixtures and transformers; 19 11/16 x 118 1/8 in. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York. Photo: Erin Fletcher

Curator Tyler Cann’s In ___We Trust: Art and Money is a fresh and imaginative approach to exhibition making. The title definitively removes higher moral or spiritual motives—so often claimed in art making—from the framework of the exhibit, and it seems especially fitting that Andy Warhol, a lover of all things material and monetized, opens the show. Hanging on the first wall are three works: the print[…..]